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Rapid Acclimation Ability Mediated by Transcriptome Changes in Reef-Building Corals.

Bay RA, Palumbi SR - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: For long-lived organisms, acclimation likely generates a faster response but is only effective if the rates and limits of acclimation match the dynamics of local environmental variation.This is in addition to a previously observed longer term response, distinguishable by its shift in baseline expression, under nonstressful conditions.Such rapid acclimation may provide some protection for this species of coral against slow onset of warming ocean temperatures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Stanford University rbay@stanford.edu.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Representative temperature record from acclimation tanks over the course of the experiment. Measurements were taken every minute with HOBO pendant temperature loggers. Gray bars at the bottom show the timing and duration of acclimation for each of two batches of 18 (six per acclimation treatment) Acropora nana colonies. Red arrows indicate heat stress assays, labeled by the duration of acclimation for assayed corals.
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evv085-F1: Representative temperature record from acclimation tanks over the course of the experiment. Measurements were taken every minute with HOBO pendant temperature loggers. Gray bars at the bottom show the timing and duration of acclimation for each of two batches of 18 (six per acclimation treatment) Acropora nana colonies. Red arrows indicate heat stress assays, labeled by the duration of acclimation for assayed corals.

Mentions: We collected 18 small colonies (∼15 cm in diameter) of the species A. nana from the reef crest on Ofu Island, American Samoa. We evenly distributed the colonies among the six acclimation tanks, resulting in three colonies per tank—six per acclimation treatment. These colonies were assayed for thermal tolerance using an acute heat stress assay (described below) after 7 and 11 days of acclimation. Because of a series of unexpected power outages affecting heat stress tanks, we were unable to assay these colonies during earlier time points. We, therefore, collected a second batch of 18 colonies 1 week later (fig. 1), which we placed in the acclimation tanks and assayed for thermal tolerance after 0 and 2 days of acclimation. In total, this provided us with six heat-stressed and six nonstressed samples for each of three acclimation treatments (29 °C, 31 °C, and 29–33 °C) at each of four acclimation durations (days 0, 2, 7, and 11)—a total of 144 samples.Fig. 1.—


Rapid Acclimation Ability Mediated by Transcriptome Changes in Reef-Building Corals.

Bay RA, Palumbi SR - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Representative temperature record from acclimation tanks over the course of the experiment. Measurements were taken every minute with HOBO pendant temperature loggers. Gray bars at the bottom show the timing and duration of acclimation for each of two batches of 18 (six per acclimation treatment) Acropora nana colonies. Red arrows indicate heat stress assays, labeled by the duration of acclimation for assayed corals.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494073&req=5

evv085-F1: Representative temperature record from acclimation tanks over the course of the experiment. Measurements were taken every minute with HOBO pendant temperature loggers. Gray bars at the bottom show the timing and duration of acclimation for each of two batches of 18 (six per acclimation treatment) Acropora nana colonies. Red arrows indicate heat stress assays, labeled by the duration of acclimation for assayed corals.
Mentions: We collected 18 small colonies (∼15 cm in diameter) of the species A. nana from the reef crest on Ofu Island, American Samoa. We evenly distributed the colonies among the six acclimation tanks, resulting in three colonies per tank—six per acclimation treatment. These colonies were assayed for thermal tolerance using an acute heat stress assay (described below) after 7 and 11 days of acclimation. Because of a series of unexpected power outages affecting heat stress tanks, we were unable to assay these colonies during earlier time points. We, therefore, collected a second batch of 18 colonies 1 week later (fig. 1), which we placed in the acclimation tanks and assayed for thermal tolerance after 0 and 2 days of acclimation. In total, this provided us with six heat-stressed and six nonstressed samples for each of three acclimation treatments (29 °C, 31 °C, and 29–33 °C) at each of four acclimation durations (days 0, 2, 7, and 11)—a total of 144 samples.Fig. 1.—

Bottom Line: For long-lived organisms, acclimation likely generates a faster response but is only effective if the rates and limits of acclimation match the dynamics of local environmental variation.This is in addition to a previously observed longer term response, distinguishable by its shift in baseline expression, under nonstressful conditions.Such rapid acclimation may provide some protection for this species of coral against slow onset of warming ocean temperatures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Stanford University rbay@stanford.edu.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus