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Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri).

Garvin MR, Thorgaard GH, Narum SR - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS).To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration.Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University michael.garvin@wsu.edu.

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Schematic of OXPHOS. Complex I oxidizes NADH to NAD+. The electrons from that reaction are carried from complex I to III through ubiquinone (UQH) and from complex III to IV through cytochrome c (CYCS) where they bind with oxygen to form water. Complexes I, III, and IV form the proton gradient that complex V uses to generate ATP from ADP. The helix HL that was shown to be a target of diversifying selection is shown (inset).
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evv078-F1: Schematic of OXPHOS. Complex I oxidizes NADH to NAD+. The electrons from that reaction are carried from complex I to III through ubiquinone (UQH) and from complex III to IV through cytochrome c (CYCS) where they bind with oxygen to form water. Complexes I, III, and IV form the proton gradient that complex V uses to generate ATP from ADP. The helix HL that was shown to be a target of diversifying selection is shown (inset).

Mentions: In all animals, respiration occurs in the mitochondria with five complexes (complexes I–V) through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS; Lodish et al. 2000). Complexes I, III, and IV generate a proton gradient that is driven by the oxidation of NADH (fig. 1). The electrochemical potential that is generated by the movement of protons is subsequently used by complex V to generate ATP from ADP. In parallel to the proton movement, the electrons that were produced from the oxidation of NADH are transported through complexes I and III and then bind oxygen to generate water at complex IV.Fig. 1.—


Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri).

Garvin MR, Thorgaard GH, Narum SR - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Schematic of OXPHOS. Complex I oxidizes NADH to NAD+. The electrons from that reaction are carried from complex I to III through ubiquinone (UQH) and from complex III to IV through cytochrome c (CYCS) where they bind with oxygen to form water. Complexes I, III, and IV form the proton gradient that complex V uses to generate ATP from ADP. The helix HL that was shown to be a target of diversifying selection is shown (inset).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494065&req=5

evv078-F1: Schematic of OXPHOS. Complex I oxidizes NADH to NAD+. The electrons from that reaction are carried from complex I to III through ubiquinone (UQH) and from complex III to IV through cytochrome c (CYCS) where they bind with oxygen to form water. Complexes I, III, and IV form the proton gradient that complex V uses to generate ATP from ADP. The helix HL that was shown to be a target of diversifying selection is shown (inset).
Mentions: In all animals, respiration occurs in the mitochondria with five complexes (complexes I–V) through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS; Lodish et al. 2000). Complexes I, III, and IV generate a proton gradient that is driven by the oxidation of NADH (fig. 1). The electrochemical potential that is generated by the movement of protons is subsequently used by complex V to generate ATP from ADP. In parallel to the proton movement, the electrons that were produced from the oxidation of NADH are transported through complexes I and III and then bind oxygen to generate water at complex IV.Fig. 1.—

Bottom Line: Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS).To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration.Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University michael.garvin@wsu.edu.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus