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Functionally Structured Genomes in Lactobacillus kunkeei Colonizing the Honey Crop and Food Products of Honeybees and Stingless Bees.

Tamarit D, Ellegaard KM, Wikander J, Olofsson T, Vásquez A, Andersson SG - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: A gene flux analysis, including previously sequenced Lactobacillus species as outgroups, indicated the influence of reductive evolution.We suggest that these features have resulted from a genome-wide loss of genes, with integrations of novel genes mostly occurring in regions flanking the origin of replication.The results provide an extended framework for reductive genome evolution and functional genome organization in bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Evolution, Cell and Molecular Biology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.

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Tanglegram comparing the tree topologies of the L. kunkeei strains and their hosts. The tree topology and the microclusters (letters A–D) in the bacterial tree (left) correspond to the maximum-likelihood tree of the concatenated nucleotide alignment presented in figure 1b. The host phylogeny (right) has been taken from Arias and Sheppard (2005), Raffiudin and Crozier (2007), and Lo et al. (2010).
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evv079-F7: Tanglegram comparing the tree topologies of the L. kunkeei strains and their hosts. The tree topology and the microclusters (letters A–D) in the bacterial tree (left) correspond to the maximum-likelihood tree of the concatenated nucleotide alignment presented in figure 1b. The host phylogeny (right) has been taken from Arias and Sheppard (2005), Raffiudin and Crozier (2007), and Lo et al. (2010).

Mentions: To determine whether L. kunkeei has codiversified with the bees, we compared the tree topologies of bacteria and bees. On the host side, it has been suggested that dwarf bees, giant bees, cavity nesting bees, and stingless bees belong to four different monophyletic groups (Arias and Sheppard 2005; Raffiudin and Crozier 2007; Lo et al. 2010). Our comparison of the diversification patterns revealed no congruence between bacterial and host tree topologies (fig. 7), suggesting that the L. kunkeei strains have not codiversified with their hosts. Nor did we find any correlation between strain relationships and country of isolation.Fig. 7.—


Functionally Structured Genomes in Lactobacillus kunkeei Colonizing the Honey Crop and Food Products of Honeybees and Stingless Bees.

Tamarit D, Ellegaard KM, Wikander J, Olofsson T, Vásquez A, Andersson SG - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Tanglegram comparing the tree topologies of the L. kunkeei strains and their hosts. The tree topology and the microclusters (letters A–D) in the bacterial tree (left) correspond to the maximum-likelihood tree of the concatenated nucleotide alignment presented in figure 1b. The host phylogeny (right) has been taken from Arias and Sheppard (2005), Raffiudin and Crozier (2007), and Lo et al. (2010).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494060&req=5

evv079-F7: Tanglegram comparing the tree topologies of the L. kunkeei strains and their hosts. The tree topology and the microclusters (letters A–D) in the bacterial tree (left) correspond to the maximum-likelihood tree of the concatenated nucleotide alignment presented in figure 1b. The host phylogeny (right) has been taken from Arias and Sheppard (2005), Raffiudin and Crozier (2007), and Lo et al. (2010).
Mentions: To determine whether L. kunkeei has codiversified with the bees, we compared the tree topologies of bacteria and bees. On the host side, it has been suggested that dwarf bees, giant bees, cavity nesting bees, and stingless bees belong to four different monophyletic groups (Arias and Sheppard 2005; Raffiudin and Crozier 2007; Lo et al. 2010). Our comparison of the diversification patterns revealed no congruence between bacterial and host tree topologies (fig. 7), suggesting that the L. kunkeei strains have not codiversified with their hosts. Nor did we find any correlation between strain relationships and country of isolation.Fig. 7.—

Bottom Line: A gene flux analysis, including previously sequenced Lactobacillus species as outgroups, indicated the influence of reductive evolution.We suggest that these features have resulted from a genome-wide loss of genes, with integrations of novel genes mostly occurring in regions flanking the origin of replication.The results provide an extended framework for reductive genome evolution and functional genome organization in bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Evolution, Cell and Molecular Biology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.

Show MeSH