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The Rise and Fall of TRP-N, an Ancient Family of Mechanogated Ion Channels, in Metazoa.

Schüler A, Schmitz G, Reft A, Özbek S, Thurm U, Bornberg-Bauer E - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: In flies, the transient-receptor-potential N protein (TRP-N) was found to be a cilia-associated mechanoreceptor.We propose that these new candidate proteins help explain the sensory complexity of Cnidaria which has been previously observed but so far has lacked a molecular underpinning.Also, the ancient appearance of TRP-N supports a common origin of important components of the nervous systems in Ctenophores, Cnidaria, and Bilateria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Muenster, Germany.

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Phylogenetic distribution of transient receptor potential (TRP) families across Metazoa. The sizes of TRP subfamilies which were found using custom-made HMMs are listed at the tips of a phylogenetic tree for a representative set of metazoan genomes which were used (see Materials and Methods for a complete set of used genomes and supplementary fig. S4, Supplementary Material online, for corresponding phylogeny and occurrences of TRP-N). The tree topology is based on Philippe et al. (2011). Presumed events of WGDs are indicated by blue ellipses. Red frame encloses genomes in which TRP-N could be identified. Blue frame indicates TRP-N proteins which are activated through a “push,” mechanism (see text for explanations). Cross indicates the point at which the only bilaterian TRP-N copy has most likely been lost, that is, at the root of amniotes. TRP-N proteins with manually curated (in this study) gene models are in bold, and genes that were resequenced and PCR confirmed for this study are in red.
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evv091-F2: Phylogenetic distribution of transient receptor potential (TRP) families across Metazoa. The sizes of TRP subfamilies which were found using custom-made HMMs are listed at the tips of a phylogenetic tree for a representative set of metazoan genomes which were used (see Materials and Methods for a complete set of used genomes and supplementary fig. S4, Supplementary Material online, for corresponding phylogeny and occurrences of TRP-N). The tree topology is based on Philippe et al. (2011). Presumed events of WGDs are indicated by blue ellipses. Red frame encloses genomes in which TRP-N could be identified. Blue frame indicates TRP-N proteins which are activated through a “push,” mechanism (see text for explanations). Cross indicates the point at which the only bilaterian TRP-N copy has most likely been lost, that is, at the root of amniotes. TRP-N proteins with manually curated (in this study) gene models are in bold, and genes that were resequenced and PCR confirmed for this study are in red.

Mentions: We used MUSCLE (Edgar 2004) to create a multiple sequence alignment of all TRP-N protein sequences mentioned in figure 2, except for the cnidarian ones for which it was a priori unknown whether they operate according to the push or pull mechanism. The resulting alignment was analyzed with JalView (Waterhouse et al. 2009; Troshin et al. 2011).Fig. 2.—


The Rise and Fall of TRP-N, an Ancient Family of Mechanogated Ion Channels, in Metazoa.

Schüler A, Schmitz G, Reft A, Özbek S, Thurm U, Bornberg-Bauer E - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Phylogenetic distribution of transient receptor potential (TRP) families across Metazoa. The sizes of TRP subfamilies which were found using custom-made HMMs are listed at the tips of a phylogenetic tree for a representative set of metazoan genomes which were used (see Materials and Methods for a complete set of used genomes and supplementary fig. S4, Supplementary Material online, for corresponding phylogeny and occurrences of TRP-N). The tree topology is based on Philippe et al. (2011). Presumed events of WGDs are indicated by blue ellipses. Red frame encloses genomes in which TRP-N could be identified. Blue frame indicates TRP-N proteins which are activated through a “push,” mechanism (see text for explanations). Cross indicates the point at which the only bilaterian TRP-N copy has most likely been lost, that is, at the root of amniotes. TRP-N proteins with manually curated (in this study) gene models are in bold, and genes that were resequenced and PCR confirmed for this study are in red.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494053&req=5

evv091-F2: Phylogenetic distribution of transient receptor potential (TRP) families across Metazoa. The sizes of TRP subfamilies which were found using custom-made HMMs are listed at the tips of a phylogenetic tree for a representative set of metazoan genomes which were used (see Materials and Methods for a complete set of used genomes and supplementary fig. S4, Supplementary Material online, for corresponding phylogeny and occurrences of TRP-N). The tree topology is based on Philippe et al. (2011). Presumed events of WGDs are indicated by blue ellipses. Red frame encloses genomes in which TRP-N could be identified. Blue frame indicates TRP-N proteins which are activated through a “push,” mechanism (see text for explanations). Cross indicates the point at which the only bilaterian TRP-N copy has most likely been lost, that is, at the root of amniotes. TRP-N proteins with manually curated (in this study) gene models are in bold, and genes that were resequenced and PCR confirmed for this study are in red.
Mentions: We used MUSCLE (Edgar 2004) to create a multiple sequence alignment of all TRP-N protein sequences mentioned in figure 2, except for the cnidarian ones for which it was a priori unknown whether they operate according to the push or pull mechanism. The resulting alignment was analyzed with JalView (Waterhouse et al. 2009; Troshin et al. 2011).Fig. 2.—

Bottom Line: In flies, the transient-receptor-potential N protein (TRP-N) was found to be a cilia-associated mechanoreceptor.We propose that these new candidate proteins help explain the sensory complexity of Cnidaria which has been previously observed but so far has lacked a molecular underpinning.Also, the ancient appearance of TRP-N supports a common origin of important components of the nervous systems in Ctenophores, Cnidaria, and Bilateria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Muenster, Germany.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus