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The impact of physical fitness and body mass index in children on the development of acute mountain sickness: A prospective observational study.

Wu SH, Lin YC, Weng YM, Chiu YH, Li WC, Wang SH, Chan CW, Chiu TF, Huang KF, Chen CH - BMC Pediatr (2015)

Bottom Line: Male gender (p = 0.004) and elevated body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.001) were each associated with the development of AMS.This study shows that both BMI and male gender were associated with the development of AMS in 11-13 year old children.Physical fitness was not associated with the occurrence of AMS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Emergency Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan. ambertwu@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is commonly found among people traveling above 2500 m. We investigated whether the occurrence of AMS is related to differences in individual physical fitness and BMI in subjects 11-13 years of age.

Methods: This study was conducted at Xue Mountain, Taiwan (elevation of 3886 m) between June 13, 2011 and June 17, 2011. Subjects were asked to ascend from Taipei City (25 m) to the summit (3886 m) over 3 days and 2 nights. Gender, age, weight, height, and fitness index (determined using a 3-minute step test) were recorded at sea level before ascent. The Lake Louise AMS score was used to record symptoms and diagnose AMS.

Results: A total of 179 subjects (mean age: 11.8 years; 102 males, 77 females) were included in the analysis. A total of 44.7% of subjects were diagnosed with AMS. Male gender (p = 0.004) and elevated body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.001) were each associated with the development of AMS. However the physical fitness index was comparable in subjects with and without AMS (67.8 ± 10.1 vs. 68.0 ± 9.3, p = 0.9).

Conclusions: This study shows that both BMI and male gender were associated with the development of AMS in 11-13 year old children. Physical fitness was not associated with the occurrence of AMS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Incidence of AMS by subject BMI. Derived by chi-square test for the comparison between AMS or no AMS and BMI, p-value = 0.001.AMS, acute mountain sickness.
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Fig3: Incidence of AMS by subject BMI. Derived by chi-square test for the comparison between AMS or no AMS and BMI, p-value = 0.001.AMS, acute mountain sickness.

Mentions: The standards for BMI are described in Additional file 1 Table 2. The incidence of AMS was significantly different across the range of BMI levels (p = 0.001; Figure 3) and was particularly high (85%) in the obese. The incidence of AMS compared to no AMS was lower in the 31 underweight (32.3% vs. 67.7%, p = 0.048), 112 normal weight (42.0% vs. 58.0%, p = 0.089), and 16 overweight (37.5% vs. 62.5%, p = 0.317) subjects. In the 20 obese subjects, the incidence of AMS was significantly higher than in those with no AMS (85% vs. 15%, p = 0.002).Table 2


The impact of physical fitness and body mass index in children on the development of acute mountain sickness: A prospective observational study.

Wu SH, Lin YC, Weng YM, Chiu YH, Li WC, Wang SH, Chan CW, Chiu TF, Huang KF, Chen CH - BMC Pediatr (2015)

Incidence of AMS by subject BMI. Derived by chi-square test for the comparison between AMS or no AMS and BMI, p-value = 0.001.AMS, acute mountain sickness.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493965&req=5

Fig3: Incidence of AMS by subject BMI. Derived by chi-square test for the comparison between AMS or no AMS and BMI, p-value = 0.001.AMS, acute mountain sickness.
Mentions: The standards for BMI are described in Additional file 1 Table 2. The incidence of AMS was significantly different across the range of BMI levels (p = 0.001; Figure 3) and was particularly high (85%) in the obese. The incidence of AMS compared to no AMS was lower in the 31 underweight (32.3% vs. 67.7%, p = 0.048), 112 normal weight (42.0% vs. 58.0%, p = 0.089), and 16 overweight (37.5% vs. 62.5%, p = 0.317) subjects. In the 20 obese subjects, the incidence of AMS was significantly higher than in those with no AMS (85% vs. 15%, p = 0.002).Table 2

Bottom Line: Male gender (p = 0.004) and elevated body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.001) were each associated with the development of AMS.This study shows that both BMI and male gender were associated with the development of AMS in 11-13 year old children.Physical fitness was not associated with the occurrence of AMS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Emergency Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan. ambertwu@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is commonly found among people traveling above 2500 m. We investigated whether the occurrence of AMS is related to differences in individual physical fitness and BMI in subjects 11-13 years of age.

Methods: This study was conducted at Xue Mountain, Taiwan (elevation of 3886 m) between June 13, 2011 and June 17, 2011. Subjects were asked to ascend from Taipei City (25 m) to the summit (3886 m) over 3 days and 2 nights. Gender, age, weight, height, and fitness index (determined using a 3-minute step test) were recorded at sea level before ascent. The Lake Louise AMS score was used to record symptoms and diagnose AMS.

Results: A total of 179 subjects (mean age: 11.8 years; 102 males, 77 females) were included in the analysis. A total of 44.7% of subjects were diagnosed with AMS. Male gender (p = 0.004) and elevated body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.001) were each associated with the development of AMS. However the physical fitness index was comparable in subjects with and without AMS (67.8 ± 10.1 vs. 68.0 ± 9.3, p = 0.9).

Conclusions: This study shows that both BMI and male gender were associated with the development of AMS in 11-13 year old children. Physical fitness was not associated with the occurrence of AMS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus