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The effects of subjective loss of control on risk-taking behavior: the mediating role of anger.

Beisswingert BM, Zhang K, Goetz T, Fang P, Fischbacher U - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Based on the Appraisal Tendency Framework on the antecedents and consequences of emotions two experimental studies examined the relationship between externally caused loss of control experiences and risk-taking behavior, as well as the assumed mediation of this relationship by the emotion anger.Multiple group comparisons revealing similar patterns in both samples affirmed the results' cross-cultural generalizability.These results implicate that anger makes people less risk averse in the process of economic decision making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Empirical Educational Research, University of Konstanz Konstanz, Germany ; Department of Empirical Educational Research, Thurgau University of Teacher Education Kreuzlingen, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Based on the Appraisal Tendency Framework on the antecedents and consequences of emotions two experimental studies examined the relationship between externally caused loss of control experiences and risk-taking behavior, as well as the assumed mediation of this relationship by the emotion anger. An experimental paradigm for inducing externally caused and consequently externally attributed loss of control which should lead to experiences of anger was developed and pretested in a Pilot Study. The relationship between loss of control experiences, anger, and risk-taking behavior was investigated using two separate student samples from Germany (N = 84, 54% female) and China (N = 125; 64% female). In line with our hypotheses, results showed that anger mediated the link between subjective loss of control experiences and increasing risk-taking behavior. Multiple group comparisons revealing similar patterns in both samples affirmed the results' cross-cultural generalizability. These results implicate that anger makes people less risk averse in the process of economic decision making.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A sample schematic representation of the experimental decreasing accuracy manipulation of displaying the participants’ prediction of the next position. The range of the intervals in which the clicking position was displayed was ±3.5° centered around the actual chosen position (red arrow) in round 5, ±10° in round 6, ±30° in round 7, and ±90° in round 8.
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Figure 3: A sample schematic representation of the experimental decreasing accuracy manipulation of displaying the participants’ prediction of the next position. The range of the intervals in which the clicking position was displayed was ±3.5° centered around the actual chosen position (red arrow) in round 5, ±10° in round 6, ±30° in round 7, and ±90° in round 8.

Mentions: In order to avoid deception the written instruction before the start of the experiment informed participants that unexpected events may occur. The first four rounds represented the baseline section in which both the CG and EG were supposed to experience subjective control; this section did not differ between the groups. The second four rounds belonged to the manipulation section and the objectively given control was continuously reduced for the participants in the EG. This induced loss of control was obtained by decreasing the accuracy with which the participants’ prediction of the object’s next position was implemented into the computer game. Instead of displaying the participant’s clicking position accurately, it was displayed randomly within an interval including the chosen position. The range of the interval increased gradually from ±3.5° in round 5, to ±10° (round 6), then ±30° (round 7), and finally to ±90° in round 8 (cf., Figure 3). This computer-based paradigm was designed using the Zurich Toolbox for Readymade Economic Experiments (z-Tree; Fischbacher, 2007) as experimental software.


The effects of subjective loss of control on risk-taking behavior: the mediating role of anger.

Beisswingert BM, Zhang K, Goetz T, Fang P, Fischbacher U - Front Psychol (2015)

A sample schematic representation of the experimental decreasing accuracy manipulation of displaying the participants’ prediction of the next position. The range of the intervals in which the clicking position was displayed was ±3.5° centered around the actual chosen position (red arrow) in round 5, ±10° in round 6, ±30° in round 7, and ±90° in round 8.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493906&req=5

Figure 3: A sample schematic representation of the experimental decreasing accuracy manipulation of displaying the participants’ prediction of the next position. The range of the intervals in which the clicking position was displayed was ±3.5° centered around the actual chosen position (red arrow) in round 5, ±10° in round 6, ±30° in round 7, and ±90° in round 8.
Mentions: In order to avoid deception the written instruction before the start of the experiment informed participants that unexpected events may occur. The first four rounds represented the baseline section in which both the CG and EG were supposed to experience subjective control; this section did not differ between the groups. The second four rounds belonged to the manipulation section and the objectively given control was continuously reduced for the participants in the EG. This induced loss of control was obtained by decreasing the accuracy with which the participants’ prediction of the object’s next position was implemented into the computer game. Instead of displaying the participant’s clicking position accurately, it was displayed randomly within an interval including the chosen position. The range of the interval increased gradually from ±3.5° in round 5, to ±10° (round 6), then ±30° (round 7), and finally to ±90° in round 8 (cf., Figure 3). This computer-based paradigm was designed using the Zurich Toolbox for Readymade Economic Experiments (z-Tree; Fischbacher, 2007) as experimental software.

Bottom Line: Based on the Appraisal Tendency Framework on the antecedents and consequences of emotions two experimental studies examined the relationship between externally caused loss of control experiences and risk-taking behavior, as well as the assumed mediation of this relationship by the emotion anger.Multiple group comparisons revealing similar patterns in both samples affirmed the results' cross-cultural generalizability.These results implicate that anger makes people less risk averse in the process of economic decision making.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Empirical Educational Research, University of Konstanz Konstanz, Germany ; Department of Empirical Educational Research, Thurgau University of Teacher Education Kreuzlingen, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Based on the Appraisal Tendency Framework on the antecedents and consequences of emotions two experimental studies examined the relationship between externally caused loss of control experiences and risk-taking behavior, as well as the assumed mediation of this relationship by the emotion anger. An experimental paradigm for inducing externally caused and consequently externally attributed loss of control which should lead to experiences of anger was developed and pretested in a Pilot Study. The relationship between loss of control experiences, anger, and risk-taking behavior was investigated using two separate student samples from Germany (N = 84, 54% female) and China (N = 125; 64% female). In line with our hypotheses, results showed that anger mediated the link between subjective loss of control experiences and increasing risk-taking behavior. Multiple group comparisons revealing similar patterns in both samples affirmed the results' cross-cultural generalizability. These results implicate that anger makes people less risk averse in the process of economic decision making.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus