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Randomized controlled trials: a systematic review of laparoscopic surgery and simulation-based training.

Vanderbilt AA, Grover AC, Pastis NJ, Feldman M, Granados DD, Murithi LK, Mainous AG - Glob J Health Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: Twenty-one studies reported learning outcomes measured in five behavioral categories: economy of movement (8 studies); suturing (3 studies); performance time (13 studies); error rates (7 studies), and global rating (7 studies).Simulation-based training can lead to demonstrable benefits of surgical skills in the OR environment.This review suggests that simulation-based training is an effective way to teach laparoscopic surgery skills, increase translation of laparoscopic surgery skills to the OR, and increase patient safety; however, more research should be conducted to determine if and how simulation can become apart of surgical curriculum.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: . avanderbilt@vcu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This systematic review was conducted to analyze the impact and describe simulation-based training and the acquisition of laparoscopic surgery skills during medical school and residency programs.

Methods: This systematic review focused on the published literature that used randomized controlled trials to examine the effectiveness of simulation-based training to develop laparoscopic surgery skills. Searching PubMed from the inception of the databases to May 1, 2014 and specific hand journal searches identified the studies. This current review of the literature addresses the question of whether laparoscopic simulation translates the acquisition of surgical skills to the operating room (OR).

Results: This systematic review of simulation-based training and laparoscopic surgery found that specific skills could be translatable to the OR. Twenty-one studies reported learning outcomes measured in five behavioral categories: economy of movement (8 studies); suturing (3 studies); performance time (13 studies); error rates (7 studies), and global rating (7 studies).

Conclusion: Simulation-based training can lead to demonstrable benefits of surgical skills in the OR environment. This review suggests that simulation-based training is an effective way to teach laparoscopic surgery skills, increase translation of laparoscopic surgery skills to the OR, and increase patient safety; however, more research should be conducted to determine if and how simulation can become apart of surgical curriculum.

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Flow chart for research article search in May 2014
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493882&req=5

Figure 1: Flow chart for research article search in May 2014

Mentions: This review focused on published literature that examines the effectiveness of simulation-based training to develop laparoscopic surgery skills translation into the OR. The studies reviewed were identified by searching PubMed from the inception of the database to April 1, 2014 and hand searching: Simulation in Health Care, Annals of Surgery, Journal American Surgery, International Journal of Surgery, Surgery, Archives of Surgery, and The British Journal of Surgery from 2000 – May 2014. Multiple combinations of several relevant key words were used to identify articles for review (haptic or simulation or simulation education or simulation medicine or laparoscopic simulation or simulation training or translation AND laparoscopic surgery). Figure 1 demonstrates the elimination of articles that came up during the search process.


Randomized controlled trials: a systematic review of laparoscopic surgery and simulation-based training.

Vanderbilt AA, Grover AC, Pastis NJ, Feldman M, Granados DD, Murithi LK, Mainous AG - Glob J Health Sci (2014)

Flow chart for research article search in May 2014
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493882&req=5

Figure 1: Flow chart for research article search in May 2014
Mentions: This review focused on published literature that examines the effectiveness of simulation-based training to develop laparoscopic surgery skills translation into the OR. The studies reviewed were identified by searching PubMed from the inception of the database to April 1, 2014 and hand searching: Simulation in Health Care, Annals of Surgery, Journal American Surgery, International Journal of Surgery, Surgery, Archives of Surgery, and The British Journal of Surgery from 2000 – May 2014. Multiple combinations of several relevant key words were used to identify articles for review (haptic or simulation or simulation education or simulation medicine or laparoscopic simulation or simulation training or translation AND laparoscopic surgery). Figure 1 demonstrates the elimination of articles that came up during the search process.

Bottom Line: Twenty-one studies reported learning outcomes measured in five behavioral categories: economy of movement (8 studies); suturing (3 studies); performance time (13 studies); error rates (7 studies), and global rating (7 studies).Simulation-based training can lead to demonstrable benefits of surgical skills in the OR environment.This review suggests that simulation-based training is an effective way to teach laparoscopic surgery skills, increase translation of laparoscopic surgery skills to the OR, and increase patient safety; however, more research should be conducted to determine if and how simulation can become apart of surgical curriculum.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: . avanderbilt@vcu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: This systematic review was conducted to analyze the impact and describe simulation-based training and the acquisition of laparoscopic surgery skills during medical school and residency programs.

Methods: This systematic review focused on the published literature that used randomized controlled trials to examine the effectiveness of simulation-based training to develop laparoscopic surgery skills. Searching PubMed from the inception of the databases to May 1, 2014 and specific hand journal searches identified the studies. This current review of the literature addresses the question of whether laparoscopic simulation translates the acquisition of surgical skills to the operating room (OR).

Results: This systematic review of simulation-based training and laparoscopic surgery found that specific skills could be translatable to the OR. Twenty-one studies reported learning outcomes measured in five behavioral categories: economy of movement (8 studies); suturing (3 studies); performance time (13 studies); error rates (7 studies), and global rating (7 studies).

Conclusion: Simulation-based training can lead to demonstrable benefits of surgical skills in the OR environment. This review suggests that simulation-based training is an effective way to teach laparoscopic surgery skills, increase translation of laparoscopic surgery skills to the OR, and increase patient safety; however, more research should be conducted to determine if and how simulation can become apart of surgical curriculum.

Show MeSH