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Brain Genomics Superstruct Project initial data release with structural, functional, and behavioral measures.

Holmes AJ, Hollinshead MO, O'Keefe TM, Petrov VI, Fariello GR, Wald LL, Fischl B, Rosen BR, Mair RW, Roffman JL, Smoller JW, Buckner RL - Sci Data (2015)

Bottom Line: Test-retest reliability datasets are included from 69 participants scanned within six months of their initial visit.For the majority of participants self-report behavioral and cognitive measures are included (n=926 and n=892 respectively).Analyses of data quality, structure, function, personality, and cognition are presented to demonstrate the dataset's utility.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Brain Science, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138, USA ; Department of Psychology, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138, USA ; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School , Boston, MA 02114, USA ; Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School , Charlestown, MA 02129, USA.

ABSTRACT
The goal of the Brain Genomics Superstruct Project (GSP) is to enable large-scale exploration of the links between brain function, behavior, and ultimately genetic variation. To provide the broader scientific community data to probe these associations, a repository of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans linked to genetic information was constructed from a sample of healthy individuals. The initial release, detailed in the present manuscript, encompasses quality screened cross-sectional data from 1,570 participants ages 18 to 35 years who were scanned with MRI and completed demographic and health questionnaires. Personality and cognitive measures were obtained on a subset of participants. Each dataset contains a T1-weighted structural MRI scan and either one (n=1,570) or two (n=1,139) resting state functional MRI scans. Test-retest reliability datasets are included from 69 participants scanned within six months of their initial visit. For the majority of participants self-report behavioral and cognitive measures are included (n=926 and n=892 respectively). Analyses of data quality, structure, function, personality, and cognition are presented to demonstrate the dataset's utility.

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IQ, behavioral, and personality measures.(a) Online estimates of full scale IQ are consistent with standard Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) full-scale IQ estimates. Scatter plot reflects relation between average online and WASI estimates of full scale IQ (n=33; r=0.80). (b) Histogram reflects the distribution of the mean derived estimates of full scale IQ. Consistent with the sample recruitment from Boston area universities and colleges, MGH, and the surrounding communities, the mean estimated full scale IQ for the sample is 110.7±6.7. (c) Participants exhibit expected personality and temperamental characteristics. Scatter plot of available data reflects expected relations between STAI trait anxiety and NEO neuroticism. Histograms of anxiety and neuroticism are represented on the x and y axes respectively. (d) Graphs reflect mental rotation task performance for females and males. White boxes indicate standard error, colored boxes reflect standard deviation, and the black lines denote the sample mean for each condition. Performance decreases with more difficult rotations.
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f3: IQ, behavioral, and personality measures.(a) Online estimates of full scale IQ are consistent with standard Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) full-scale IQ estimates. Scatter plot reflects relation between average online and WASI estimates of full scale IQ (n=33; r=0.80). (b) Histogram reflects the distribution of the mean derived estimates of full scale IQ. Consistent with the sample recruitment from Boston area universities and colleges, MGH, and the surrounding communities, the mean estimated full scale IQ for the sample is 110.7±6.7. (c) Participants exhibit expected personality and temperamental characteristics. Scatter plot of available data reflects expected relations between STAI trait anxiety and NEO neuroticism. Histograms of anxiety and neuroticism are represented on the x and y axes respectively. (d) Graphs reflect mental rotation task performance for females and males. White boxes indicate standard error, colored boxes reflect standard deviation, and the black lines denote the sample mean for each condition. Performance decreases with more difficult rotations.

Mentions: To estimate validity of the online IQ estimates, online estimates of full scale IQ were examined in relation to Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) derived estimates of full-scale IQ collected in person55. Thirty-three participants completed the WASI on the day of scan in addition to the full GSP online battery. A strong relation was found between the average estimated IQ from the WASI with that derived from the online estimates (r=0.80; Fig. 3a). As expected, the derived estimates of full scale IQ were normally distributed across the sample (Fig. 3b). Consistent with the sample recruitment from Boston area universities and colleges, MGH, and the surrounding communities, the mean estimated full scale IQ for the sample was elevated (110.7±6.7) relative to the expected distribution for the general population. Histograms reflecting the respective distributions of matrix reasoning and derived estimates of full scale IQ are presented in Supplementary Fig. 6.


Brain Genomics Superstruct Project initial data release with structural, functional, and behavioral measures.

Holmes AJ, Hollinshead MO, O'Keefe TM, Petrov VI, Fariello GR, Wald LL, Fischl B, Rosen BR, Mair RW, Roffman JL, Smoller JW, Buckner RL - Sci Data (2015)

IQ, behavioral, and personality measures.(a) Online estimates of full scale IQ are consistent with standard Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) full-scale IQ estimates. Scatter plot reflects relation between average online and WASI estimates of full scale IQ (n=33; r=0.80). (b) Histogram reflects the distribution of the mean derived estimates of full scale IQ. Consistent with the sample recruitment from Boston area universities and colleges, MGH, and the surrounding communities, the mean estimated full scale IQ for the sample is 110.7±6.7. (c) Participants exhibit expected personality and temperamental characteristics. Scatter plot of available data reflects expected relations between STAI trait anxiety and NEO neuroticism. Histograms of anxiety and neuroticism are represented on the x and y axes respectively. (d) Graphs reflect mental rotation task performance for females and males. White boxes indicate standard error, colored boxes reflect standard deviation, and the black lines denote the sample mean for each condition. Performance decreases with more difficult rotations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493828&req=5

f3: IQ, behavioral, and personality measures.(a) Online estimates of full scale IQ are consistent with standard Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) full-scale IQ estimates. Scatter plot reflects relation between average online and WASI estimates of full scale IQ (n=33; r=0.80). (b) Histogram reflects the distribution of the mean derived estimates of full scale IQ. Consistent with the sample recruitment from Boston area universities and colleges, MGH, and the surrounding communities, the mean estimated full scale IQ for the sample is 110.7±6.7. (c) Participants exhibit expected personality and temperamental characteristics. Scatter plot of available data reflects expected relations between STAI trait anxiety and NEO neuroticism. Histograms of anxiety and neuroticism are represented on the x and y axes respectively. (d) Graphs reflect mental rotation task performance for females and males. White boxes indicate standard error, colored boxes reflect standard deviation, and the black lines denote the sample mean for each condition. Performance decreases with more difficult rotations.
Mentions: To estimate validity of the online IQ estimates, online estimates of full scale IQ were examined in relation to Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) derived estimates of full-scale IQ collected in person55. Thirty-three participants completed the WASI on the day of scan in addition to the full GSP online battery. A strong relation was found between the average estimated IQ from the WASI with that derived from the online estimates (r=0.80; Fig. 3a). As expected, the derived estimates of full scale IQ were normally distributed across the sample (Fig. 3b). Consistent with the sample recruitment from Boston area universities and colleges, MGH, and the surrounding communities, the mean estimated full scale IQ for the sample was elevated (110.7±6.7) relative to the expected distribution for the general population. Histograms reflecting the respective distributions of matrix reasoning and derived estimates of full scale IQ are presented in Supplementary Fig. 6.

Bottom Line: Test-retest reliability datasets are included from 69 participants scanned within six months of their initial visit.For the majority of participants self-report behavioral and cognitive measures are included (n=926 and n=892 respectively).Analyses of data quality, structure, function, personality, and cognition are presented to demonstrate the dataset's utility.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Brain Science, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138, USA ; Department of Psychology, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138, USA ; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School , Boston, MA 02114, USA ; Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Research, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School , Charlestown, MA 02129, USA.

ABSTRACT
The goal of the Brain Genomics Superstruct Project (GSP) is to enable large-scale exploration of the links between brain function, behavior, and ultimately genetic variation. To provide the broader scientific community data to probe these associations, a repository of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans linked to genetic information was constructed from a sample of healthy individuals. The initial release, detailed in the present manuscript, encompasses quality screened cross-sectional data from 1,570 participants ages 18 to 35 years who were scanned with MRI and completed demographic and health questionnaires. Personality and cognitive measures were obtained on a subset of participants. Each dataset contains a T1-weighted structural MRI scan and either one (n=1,570) or two (n=1,139) resting state functional MRI scans. Test-retest reliability datasets are included from 69 participants scanned within six months of their initial visit. For the majority of participants self-report behavioral and cognitive measures are included (n=926 and n=892 respectively). Analyses of data quality, structure, function, personality, and cognition are presented to demonstrate the dataset's utility.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus