Limits...
Growth and physiological responses of isohydric and anisohydric poplars to drought.

Attia Z, Domec JC, Oren R, Way DA, Moshelion M - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Low gs of the isohydric BS under drought reduced CO2 assimilation rates and biomass potential under moderate water stress.Overall, the results indicate three strategies for how closely related biomass species deal with water stress: survival-isohydric (BS), sensitive-anisohydric (BSxSI), and resilience-anisohydric (SI).Implications for woody biomass growth, water-use efficiency, and survival under variable environmental conditions are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Recovery rate (relative to pre-treatment transpiration level) from water deprivation of ~30% SWCg. Data are shown as means ± SE: BS (n = 4), SI (n = 15), and the BSxSI (n = 19). Arrows (with colours matching the symbols for the respective genotypes) indicate when post-stress transpiration rates were not significantly different from the pre-treatment values according to a Student t-test, P < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493787&req=5

Figure 5: Recovery rate (relative to pre-treatment transpiration level) from water deprivation of ~30% SWCg. Data are shown as means ± SE: BS (n = 4), SI (n = 15), and the BSxSI (n = 19). Arrows (with colours matching the symbols for the respective genotypes) indicate when post-stress transpiration rates were not significantly different from the pre-treatment values according to a Student t-test, P < 0.05.

Mentions: To better understand how these morphological and physiological differences contribute to plant growth rates, water-use efficiency, and drought tolerance, whole-plant transpiration, growth rate, and WUEa were measured. The SI and BSxSI had higher cumulative transpiration and weight gain than the BS under well-watered conditions (Fig. 4A,B,D), which did not correspond with a higher leaf-level E and gs (Fig. 1D,E), but could be explained by considering the different canopy morphology and stomatal densities between the genotypes (Fig. 3). However, the isohydric BS gained more biomass for a given amount of water transpired, generating a higher WUEa compared to the anisohydric SI plants (Fig 4C). The recovery patterns from severe water stress (reaching SWCg <30%) showed that the BS and SI fully recovered within 3–4 days of irrigation, while the BSxSI did not recover to their initial transpiration rates even after 11 days of irrigation (Fig. 5).


Growth and physiological responses of isohydric and anisohydric poplars to drought.

Attia Z, Domec JC, Oren R, Way DA, Moshelion M - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Recovery rate (relative to pre-treatment transpiration level) from water deprivation of ~30% SWCg. Data are shown as means ± SE: BS (n = 4), SI (n = 15), and the BSxSI (n = 19). Arrows (with colours matching the symbols for the respective genotypes) indicate when post-stress transpiration rates were not significantly different from the pre-treatment values according to a Student t-test, P < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493787&req=5

Figure 5: Recovery rate (relative to pre-treatment transpiration level) from water deprivation of ~30% SWCg. Data are shown as means ± SE: BS (n = 4), SI (n = 15), and the BSxSI (n = 19). Arrows (with colours matching the symbols for the respective genotypes) indicate when post-stress transpiration rates were not significantly different from the pre-treatment values according to a Student t-test, P < 0.05.
Mentions: To better understand how these morphological and physiological differences contribute to plant growth rates, water-use efficiency, and drought tolerance, whole-plant transpiration, growth rate, and WUEa were measured. The SI and BSxSI had higher cumulative transpiration and weight gain than the BS under well-watered conditions (Fig. 4A,B,D), which did not correspond with a higher leaf-level E and gs (Fig. 1D,E), but could be explained by considering the different canopy morphology and stomatal densities between the genotypes (Fig. 3). However, the isohydric BS gained more biomass for a given amount of water transpired, generating a higher WUEa compared to the anisohydric SI plants (Fig 4C). The recovery patterns from severe water stress (reaching SWCg <30%) showed that the BS and SI fully recovered within 3–4 days of irrigation, while the BSxSI did not recover to their initial transpiration rates even after 11 days of irrigation (Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: Low gs of the isohydric BS under drought reduced CO2 assimilation rates and biomass potential under moderate water stress.Overall, the results indicate three strategies for how closely related biomass species deal with water stress: survival-isohydric (BS), sensitive-anisohydric (BSxSI), and resilience-anisohydric (SI).Implications for woody biomass growth, water-use efficiency, and survival under variable environmental conditions are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, The Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus