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Sub-zero cold tolerance of Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) and Miscanthus × giganteus: candidate bioenergy crops for cool temperate climates.

Friesen PC, Peixoto Mde M, Lee DK, Sage RF - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Photosynthesis and electrolyte leakage measurements in spring and summer demonstrate that S. pectinata leaves have greater frost tolerance in the field.These results indicate M. × giganteus will be unsuitable for production in continental interiors of cool-temperate climate zones unless freezing and frost tolerance are improved.By contrast, S. pectinata has the freezing and frost tolerance required for a higher-latitude bioenergy crop.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2 r.sage@utoronto.ca patrick.friesen@utoronto.ca.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photosynthesis after a mild frost in Miscanthus × giganteus and three Spartina pectinata accessions ‘Red River’, ‘IL-102’, and ‘Summerford’ (pooled means). (A) The light response of the net CO2 assimilation rate and (B) Fv/Fm and ΦP. Measurements were conducted on 17 May 2014 after a mild frost event earlier that day. Means ±SE, n=5–12 for net CO2 assimilation rate, 3–5 for Fv/Fm, and 2–5 for ΦP. Measurements were made at ambient CO2 concentrations of 400 µmol mol-1 and leaf temperatures of 10.7°C (±0.4) for M. × giganteus and 10.9°C (±0.3) for S. pectinata. T-tests show both parameters are significantly different between the species at each light intensity (p<0.01). (Inset) The light response of net CO2 assimilation rate and light intensity between 0 and 80 µmol photons m-2 s-1 for Miscanthus × giganteus and pooled measurements of the three Spartina pectinata genotypes. Means ±SE, n=3–5 at 0 PPFD and 5–8 for all other light intensities. The maximum incident quantum yield of CO2 assimilation (ΦCO2max) was calculated as the slope of the linear regression shown for each species. Asterisks indicate significantly different slopes (p<0.001).
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Figure 7: Photosynthesis after a mild frost in Miscanthus × giganteus and three Spartina pectinata accessions ‘Red River’, ‘IL-102’, and ‘Summerford’ (pooled means). (A) The light response of the net CO2 assimilation rate and (B) Fv/Fm and ΦP. Measurements were conducted on 17 May 2014 after a mild frost event earlier that day. Means ±SE, n=5–12 for net CO2 assimilation rate, 3–5 for Fv/Fm, and 2–5 for ΦP. Measurements were made at ambient CO2 concentrations of 400 µmol mol-1 and leaf temperatures of 10.7°C (±0.4) for M. × giganteus and 10.9°C (±0.3) for S. pectinata. T-tests show both parameters are significantly different between the species at each light intensity (p<0.01). (Inset) The light response of net CO2 assimilation rate and light intensity between 0 and 80 µmol photons m-2 s-1 for Miscanthus × giganteus and pooled measurements of the three Spartina pectinata genotypes. Means ±SE, n=3–5 at 0 PPFD and 5–8 for all other light intensities. The maximum incident quantum yield of CO2 assimilation (ΦCO2max) was calculated as the slope of the linear regression shown for each species. Asterisks indicate significantly different slopes (p<0.001).

Mentions: Air temperature fell to 0.3°C early in the morning of 17 May, following 24h of air temperatures <10°C (Fig. 1A). Just before dawn on 17 May, frost was visible on leaves of both S. pectinata and M. × giganteus with leaf temperatures between 0°C and 1°C. Leaves of M. × giganteus were visibly yellow and chlorotic compared to S. pectinata, whose leaves looked healthy and similar in appearance to those later in the spring. At leaf temperatures between 9°C and 12°C, S. pectinata leaves had a greater incident ΦCO2max of 0.051 compared to 0.026 for M. × giganteus on 17 May (Fig. 7A, inset). At every light intensity above 40 µmol m-2 s-1, S. pectinata had a significantly higher A compared to M. × giganteus and was almost three times higher at 1800 µmol m-2 s-1 (Fig. 7A). Photosystem II operating efficiency (ΦP) was also significantly higher in S. pectinata compared to M. × giganteus at every light intensity, being over two times higher at low light and over four times higher at the highest light intensities (Fig. 7B).


Sub-zero cold tolerance of Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) and Miscanthus × giganteus: candidate bioenergy crops for cool temperate climates.

Friesen PC, Peixoto Mde M, Lee DK, Sage RF - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Photosynthesis after a mild frost in Miscanthus × giganteus and three Spartina pectinata accessions ‘Red River’, ‘IL-102’, and ‘Summerford’ (pooled means). (A) The light response of the net CO2 assimilation rate and (B) Fv/Fm and ΦP. Measurements were conducted on 17 May 2014 after a mild frost event earlier that day. Means ±SE, n=5–12 for net CO2 assimilation rate, 3–5 for Fv/Fm, and 2–5 for ΦP. Measurements were made at ambient CO2 concentrations of 400 µmol mol-1 and leaf temperatures of 10.7°C (±0.4) for M. × giganteus and 10.9°C (±0.3) for S. pectinata. T-tests show both parameters are significantly different between the species at each light intensity (p<0.01). (Inset) The light response of net CO2 assimilation rate and light intensity between 0 and 80 µmol photons m-2 s-1 for Miscanthus × giganteus and pooled measurements of the three Spartina pectinata genotypes. Means ±SE, n=3–5 at 0 PPFD and 5–8 for all other light intensities. The maximum incident quantum yield of CO2 assimilation (ΦCO2max) was calculated as the slope of the linear regression shown for each species. Asterisks indicate significantly different slopes (p<0.001).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493780&req=5

Figure 7: Photosynthesis after a mild frost in Miscanthus × giganteus and three Spartina pectinata accessions ‘Red River’, ‘IL-102’, and ‘Summerford’ (pooled means). (A) The light response of the net CO2 assimilation rate and (B) Fv/Fm and ΦP. Measurements were conducted on 17 May 2014 after a mild frost event earlier that day. Means ±SE, n=5–12 for net CO2 assimilation rate, 3–5 for Fv/Fm, and 2–5 for ΦP. Measurements were made at ambient CO2 concentrations of 400 µmol mol-1 and leaf temperatures of 10.7°C (±0.4) for M. × giganteus and 10.9°C (±0.3) for S. pectinata. T-tests show both parameters are significantly different between the species at each light intensity (p<0.01). (Inset) The light response of net CO2 assimilation rate and light intensity between 0 and 80 µmol photons m-2 s-1 for Miscanthus × giganteus and pooled measurements of the three Spartina pectinata genotypes. Means ±SE, n=3–5 at 0 PPFD and 5–8 for all other light intensities. The maximum incident quantum yield of CO2 assimilation (ΦCO2max) was calculated as the slope of the linear regression shown for each species. Asterisks indicate significantly different slopes (p<0.001).
Mentions: Air temperature fell to 0.3°C early in the morning of 17 May, following 24h of air temperatures <10°C (Fig. 1A). Just before dawn on 17 May, frost was visible on leaves of both S. pectinata and M. × giganteus with leaf temperatures between 0°C and 1°C. Leaves of M. × giganteus were visibly yellow and chlorotic compared to S. pectinata, whose leaves looked healthy and similar in appearance to those later in the spring. At leaf temperatures between 9°C and 12°C, S. pectinata leaves had a greater incident ΦCO2max of 0.051 compared to 0.026 for M. × giganteus on 17 May (Fig. 7A, inset). At every light intensity above 40 µmol m-2 s-1, S. pectinata had a significantly higher A compared to M. × giganteus and was almost three times higher at 1800 µmol m-2 s-1 (Fig. 7A). Photosystem II operating efficiency (ΦP) was also significantly higher in S. pectinata compared to M. × giganteus at every light intensity, being over two times higher at low light and over four times higher at the highest light intensities (Fig. 7B).

Bottom Line: Photosynthesis and electrolyte leakage measurements in spring and summer demonstrate that S. pectinata leaves have greater frost tolerance in the field.These results indicate M. × giganteus will be unsuitable for production in continental interiors of cool-temperate climate zones unless freezing and frost tolerance are improved.By contrast, S. pectinata has the freezing and frost tolerance required for a higher-latitude bioenergy crop.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2 r.sage@utoronto.ca patrick.friesen@utoronto.ca.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus