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Sub-zero cold tolerance of Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) and Miscanthus × giganteus: candidate bioenergy crops for cool temperate climates.

Friesen PC, Peixoto Mde M, Lee DK, Sage RF - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Photosynthesis and electrolyte leakage measurements in spring and summer demonstrate that S. pectinata leaves have greater frost tolerance in the field.These results indicate M. × giganteus will be unsuitable for production in continental interiors of cool-temperate climate zones unless freezing and frost tolerance are improved.By contrast, S. pectinata has the freezing and frost tolerance required for a higher-latitude bioenergy crop.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2 r.sage@utoronto.ca patrick.friesen@utoronto.ca.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean canopy heights (±SE) for the spring of 2014 for Miscanthus × giganteus and the three indicated accessions of Spartina pectinata. n=4–10 plants for each date. Different letters indicate significant differences between genotypes (p<0.05) from Holm-Sidak post hoc tests following one-way ANOVAs.
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Figure 6: Mean canopy heights (±SE) for the spring of 2014 for Miscanthus × giganteus and the three indicated accessions of Spartina pectinata. n=4–10 plants for each date. Different letters indicate significant differences between genotypes (p<0.05) from Holm-Sidak post hoc tests following one-way ANOVAs.

Mentions: At the autumn harvest (21 November), all genotypes of S. pectinata had senesced their leaf canopies from the previous summer and produced spikes of scale-like leaves that emerged above the soil surface before entering dormancy. These spikes appeared dormant on 19 April of the following year (2014) but by 28 April, some were opening to reveal new green leaves. Shoots of M. × giganteus had not emerged on 28 April, and had just recently emerged by 12 May (Henk Wichers, personal communication). A linear regression of M. × giganteus canopy heights from 17 May and 29 May estimated 9 May to be the emergence date (not shown). Canopy heights were significantly greater for S. pectinata ‘IL-102’ and ‘Red River’ compared to S. pectinata ‘Summerford’ and M. × giganteus throughout May (Fig. 6). By 25 June, canopy heights of S. pectinata ‘IL-102’, ‘Red River’ and M. × giganteus were all close to 80cm with only S. pectinata ‘Summerford’ being significantly lower (Fig. 6). On 25 June, S. pectinata ‘Summerford’ had visible or emerging flower spikes, however none of the other genotypes showed signs of flowering. By 6 October, S. pectinata ‘Red River’ had finished maturing seed, whereas ‘IL-102’ and M. × giganteus showed flag leaves but no visible flowers.


Sub-zero cold tolerance of Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) and Miscanthus × giganteus: candidate bioenergy crops for cool temperate climates.

Friesen PC, Peixoto Mde M, Lee DK, Sage RF - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Mean canopy heights (±SE) for the spring of 2014 for Miscanthus × giganteus and the three indicated accessions of Spartina pectinata. n=4–10 plants for each date. Different letters indicate significant differences between genotypes (p<0.05) from Holm-Sidak post hoc tests following one-way ANOVAs.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493780&req=5

Figure 6: Mean canopy heights (±SE) for the spring of 2014 for Miscanthus × giganteus and the three indicated accessions of Spartina pectinata. n=4–10 plants for each date. Different letters indicate significant differences between genotypes (p<0.05) from Holm-Sidak post hoc tests following one-way ANOVAs.
Mentions: At the autumn harvest (21 November), all genotypes of S. pectinata had senesced their leaf canopies from the previous summer and produced spikes of scale-like leaves that emerged above the soil surface before entering dormancy. These spikes appeared dormant on 19 April of the following year (2014) but by 28 April, some were opening to reveal new green leaves. Shoots of M. × giganteus had not emerged on 28 April, and had just recently emerged by 12 May (Henk Wichers, personal communication). A linear regression of M. × giganteus canopy heights from 17 May and 29 May estimated 9 May to be the emergence date (not shown). Canopy heights were significantly greater for S. pectinata ‘IL-102’ and ‘Red River’ compared to S. pectinata ‘Summerford’ and M. × giganteus throughout May (Fig. 6). By 25 June, canopy heights of S. pectinata ‘IL-102’, ‘Red River’ and M. × giganteus were all close to 80cm with only S. pectinata ‘Summerford’ being significantly lower (Fig. 6). On 25 June, S. pectinata ‘Summerford’ had visible or emerging flower spikes, however none of the other genotypes showed signs of flowering. By 6 October, S. pectinata ‘Red River’ had finished maturing seed, whereas ‘IL-102’ and M. × giganteus showed flag leaves but no visible flowers.

Bottom Line: Photosynthesis and electrolyte leakage measurements in spring and summer demonstrate that S. pectinata leaves have greater frost tolerance in the field.These results indicate M. × giganteus will be unsuitable for production in continental interiors of cool-temperate climate zones unless freezing and frost tolerance are improved.By contrast, S. pectinata has the freezing and frost tolerance required for a higher-latitude bioenergy crop.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2 r.sage@utoronto.ca patrick.friesen@utoronto.ca.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus