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Sub-zero cold tolerance of Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) and Miscanthus × giganteus: candidate bioenergy crops for cool temperate climates.

Friesen PC, Peixoto Mde M, Lee DK, Sage RF - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Photosynthesis and electrolyte leakage measurements in spring and summer demonstrate that S. pectinata leaves have greater frost tolerance in the field.These results indicate M. × giganteus will be unsuitable for production in continental interiors of cool-temperate climate zones unless freezing and frost tolerance are improved.By contrast, S. pectinata has the freezing and frost tolerance required for a higher-latitude bioenergy crop.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2 r.sage@utoronto.ca patrick.friesen@utoronto.ca.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The relationship between % relative conductivity and treatment temperature for leaves of Miscanthus × giganteus and the three genotypes of Spartina pectinata on (A) 29 May 2014 harvest and (B) 25 June 2014. Miscanthus × giganteus (●); S. pectinata accessions: ‘Red River’ (∆), ‘IL-102’ (□), ‘Summerford’ (◊). Mean ±SE, n=9–12 per treatment temperature. Solid curves show the corresponding best-fit logistic regressions. Temperatures corresponding to 50% electrolyte leakage (=50% RC and the TEL50) are indicated by the dashed lines.
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Figure 5: The relationship between % relative conductivity and treatment temperature for leaves of Miscanthus × giganteus and the three genotypes of Spartina pectinata on (A) 29 May 2014 harvest and (B) 25 June 2014. Miscanthus × giganteus (●); S. pectinata accessions: ‘Red River’ (∆), ‘IL-102’ (□), ‘Summerford’ (◊). Mean ±SE, n=9–12 per treatment temperature. Solid curves show the corresponding best-fit logistic regressions. Temperatures corresponding to 50% electrolyte leakage (=50% RC and the TEL50) are indicated by the dashed lines.

Mentions: Cold tolerance thresholds of leaves showed the same general pattern for both spring harvest dates. For the 29 May harvest, the temperature corresponding to 50% electrolyte leakage (TEL50) was −5°C in M. × giganteus and −9°C to −10°C in the three S. pectinata genotypes (Fig. 5A). For the 25 June harvest the TEL50 was −6°C in M. × giganteus and −10°C to −11°C in the three S. pectinata genotypes (Fig. 5B).


Sub-zero cold tolerance of Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) and Miscanthus × giganteus: candidate bioenergy crops for cool temperate climates.

Friesen PC, Peixoto Mde M, Lee DK, Sage RF - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

The relationship between % relative conductivity and treatment temperature for leaves of Miscanthus × giganteus and the three genotypes of Spartina pectinata on (A) 29 May 2014 harvest and (B) 25 June 2014. Miscanthus × giganteus (●); S. pectinata accessions: ‘Red River’ (∆), ‘IL-102’ (□), ‘Summerford’ (◊). Mean ±SE, n=9–12 per treatment temperature. Solid curves show the corresponding best-fit logistic regressions. Temperatures corresponding to 50% electrolyte leakage (=50% RC and the TEL50) are indicated by the dashed lines.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493780&req=5

Figure 5: The relationship between % relative conductivity and treatment temperature for leaves of Miscanthus × giganteus and the three genotypes of Spartina pectinata on (A) 29 May 2014 harvest and (B) 25 June 2014. Miscanthus × giganteus (●); S. pectinata accessions: ‘Red River’ (∆), ‘IL-102’ (□), ‘Summerford’ (◊). Mean ±SE, n=9–12 per treatment temperature. Solid curves show the corresponding best-fit logistic regressions. Temperatures corresponding to 50% electrolyte leakage (=50% RC and the TEL50) are indicated by the dashed lines.
Mentions: Cold tolerance thresholds of leaves showed the same general pattern for both spring harvest dates. For the 29 May harvest, the temperature corresponding to 50% electrolyte leakage (TEL50) was −5°C in M. × giganteus and −9°C to −10°C in the three S. pectinata genotypes (Fig. 5A). For the 25 June harvest the TEL50 was −6°C in M. × giganteus and −10°C to −11°C in the three S. pectinata genotypes (Fig. 5B).

Bottom Line: Photosynthesis and electrolyte leakage measurements in spring and summer demonstrate that S. pectinata leaves have greater frost tolerance in the field.These results indicate M. × giganteus will be unsuitable for production in continental interiors of cool-temperate climate zones unless freezing and frost tolerance are improved.By contrast, S. pectinata has the freezing and frost tolerance required for a higher-latitude bioenergy crop.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2 r.sage@utoronto.ca patrick.friesen@utoronto.ca.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus