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Sub-zero cold tolerance of Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) and Miscanthus × giganteus: candidate bioenergy crops for cool temperate climates.

Friesen PC, Peixoto Mde M, Lee DK, Sage RF - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Photosynthesis and electrolyte leakage measurements in spring and summer demonstrate that S. pectinata leaves have greater frost tolerance in the field.These results indicate M. × giganteus will be unsuitable for production in continental interiors of cool-temperate climate zones unless freezing and frost tolerance are improved.By contrast, S. pectinata has the freezing and frost tolerance required for a higher-latitude bioenergy crop.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2 r.sage@utoronto.ca patrick.friesen@utoronto.ca.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The relationship between exposure temperature and the % of rhizome survival for the spring harvest on 28 April 2014. (A) Results from Miscanthus × giganteus. (B–D) Results from the ‘Red River’, ‘IL-102’ and ‘Summerford’ accessions of Spartina pectinata. Mean ±SE, n=12 rhizomes per treatment temperature. The estimated temperatures corresponding to 50% rhizome mortality (LT50) are shown in each panel. The trend line is the predicted relationship using a generalized linear model fitted to the data. See online Supplementary Table S3 for means.
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Figure 3: The relationship between exposure temperature and the % of rhizome survival for the spring harvest on 28 April 2014. (A) Results from Miscanthus × giganteus. (B–D) Results from the ‘Red River’, ‘IL-102’ and ‘Summerford’ accessions of Spartina pectinata. Mean ±SE, n=12 rhizomes per treatment temperature. The estimated temperatures corresponding to 50% rhizome mortality (LT50) are shown in each panel. The trend line is the predicted relationship using a generalized linear model fitted to the data. See online Supplementary Table S3 for means.

Mentions: Within each genotype, we observed no difference in the LT50 or LEL50 of rhizomes between the November (autumn) and February (winter) trials, allowing us to pool the results for these sampling periods (Table 1, Supplementary Table S1). All accessions of S. pectinata showed a lower LT50 compared to M. × giganteus (Table 2). The LT50 of rhizomes from the autumn/winter harvest of the three S. pectinata genotypes was −23°C to −24°C versus −4°C for M. × giganteus (Table 2, Fig. 2). The LT50 for the 28 April spring harvest of the S. pectinata genotypes was −10°C, while it remained at −4°C for M. × giganteus (Table 2, Fig. 3). When harvested on 28 April, 20% of all rhizomes from M. × giganteus were dead; most of these were close to the soil surface in the rhizome cluster. There was no rhizome mortality in any of the three S. pectinata genotypes.


Sub-zero cold tolerance of Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) and Miscanthus × giganteus: candidate bioenergy crops for cool temperate climates.

Friesen PC, Peixoto Mde M, Lee DK, Sage RF - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

The relationship between exposure temperature and the % of rhizome survival for the spring harvest on 28 April 2014. (A) Results from Miscanthus × giganteus. (B–D) Results from the ‘Red River’, ‘IL-102’ and ‘Summerford’ accessions of Spartina pectinata. Mean ±SE, n=12 rhizomes per treatment temperature. The estimated temperatures corresponding to 50% rhizome mortality (LT50) are shown in each panel. The trend line is the predicted relationship using a generalized linear model fitted to the data. See online Supplementary Table S3 for means.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493780&req=5

Figure 3: The relationship between exposure temperature and the % of rhizome survival for the spring harvest on 28 April 2014. (A) Results from Miscanthus × giganteus. (B–D) Results from the ‘Red River’, ‘IL-102’ and ‘Summerford’ accessions of Spartina pectinata. Mean ±SE, n=12 rhizomes per treatment temperature. The estimated temperatures corresponding to 50% rhizome mortality (LT50) are shown in each panel. The trend line is the predicted relationship using a generalized linear model fitted to the data. See online Supplementary Table S3 for means.
Mentions: Within each genotype, we observed no difference in the LT50 or LEL50 of rhizomes between the November (autumn) and February (winter) trials, allowing us to pool the results for these sampling periods (Table 1, Supplementary Table S1). All accessions of S. pectinata showed a lower LT50 compared to M. × giganteus (Table 2). The LT50 of rhizomes from the autumn/winter harvest of the three S. pectinata genotypes was −23°C to −24°C versus −4°C for M. × giganteus (Table 2, Fig. 2). The LT50 for the 28 April spring harvest of the S. pectinata genotypes was −10°C, while it remained at −4°C for M. × giganteus (Table 2, Fig. 3). When harvested on 28 April, 20% of all rhizomes from M. × giganteus were dead; most of these were close to the soil surface in the rhizome cluster. There was no rhizome mortality in any of the three S. pectinata genotypes.

Bottom Line: Photosynthesis and electrolyte leakage measurements in spring and summer demonstrate that S. pectinata leaves have greater frost tolerance in the field.These results indicate M. × giganteus will be unsuitable for production in continental interiors of cool-temperate climate zones unless freezing and frost tolerance are improved.By contrast, S. pectinata has the freezing and frost tolerance required for a higher-latitude bioenergy crop.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2 r.sage@utoronto.ca patrick.friesen@utoronto.ca.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus