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Sub-zero cold tolerance of Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) and Miscanthus × giganteus: candidate bioenergy crops for cool temperate climates.

Friesen PC, Peixoto Mde M, Lee DK, Sage RF - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Photosynthesis and electrolyte leakage measurements in spring and summer demonstrate that S. pectinata leaves have greater frost tolerance in the field.These results indicate M. × giganteus will be unsuitable for production in continental interiors of cool-temperate climate zones unless freezing and frost tolerance are improved.By contrast, S. pectinata has the freezing and frost tolerance required for a higher-latitude bioenergy crop.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2 r.sage@utoronto.ca patrick.friesen@utoronto.ca.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Air and soil temperatures at Elora, Ontario field site, 1 October 2013–25 June 2014. (A) Mean, maximum and minimum air temperature and (B) mean soil temperature. Soil temperatures are an average of thermistors at 2cm and 8cm depth below soil surface across the field plot (n=7 for each depth). Arrows indicate harvest dates for rhizomes and senesced leaves (21 November 2013, 2 February 2014 and 28 April 2014). Air temperature is from the Environment Canada National Climate Data and Information Archive (Environment Canada 2015).
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Figure 1: Air and soil temperatures at Elora, Ontario field site, 1 October 2013–25 June 2014. (A) Mean, maximum and minimum air temperature and (B) mean soil temperature. Soil temperatures are an average of thermistors at 2cm and 8cm depth below soil surface across the field plot (n=7 for each depth). Arrows indicate harvest dates for rhizomes and senesced leaves (21 November 2013, 2 February 2014 and 28 April 2014). Air temperature is from the Environment Canada National Climate Data and Information Archive (Environment Canada 2015).

Mentions: Minimum daily air temperature at the field site fell below 0°C by the end of October 2013 and did not consistently rise above 0°C until the middle of April 2014 (Fig. 1A). Minimum air temperature was below −20°C for much of January and February 2014, and fell to seasonal minimums near −30°C on four dates in later January to February (Fig. 1A). Soil temperature followed the decline in air temperature from the beginning of September until 11 November, when temperatures at 2cm depth first fell below 0°C (Fig. 1). Following a warm front on 5 December, a cold front reduced soil temperatures to −3°C at 2cm depth and −1°C at 8cm depth. On 7 December, strong winds up to 41 km h-1 reduced soil temperatures to their coldest point of the autumn/winter season such that on the morning of 8 December, soil temperatures across the plot ranged from −0.5°C to −6.0°C at 2cm depth to −0.1°C to −3.4°C at 8cm depth. Snow accumulated shortly after this time, and stayed until approximately 4 April, with mid-winter accumulations of over 40cm (Jordan Forsyth, Elora Weather Station Manager, personal communication). Despite periodic air temperatures that fell below −25°C, soil temperatures remained near zero throughout the period of snow cover and only warmed above 0°C following complete snow melt after 6 April (Fig. 1).


Sub-zero cold tolerance of Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) and Miscanthus × giganteus: candidate bioenergy crops for cool temperate climates.

Friesen PC, Peixoto Mde M, Lee DK, Sage RF - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Air and soil temperatures at Elora, Ontario field site, 1 October 2013–25 June 2014. (A) Mean, maximum and minimum air temperature and (B) mean soil temperature. Soil temperatures are an average of thermistors at 2cm and 8cm depth below soil surface across the field plot (n=7 for each depth). Arrows indicate harvest dates for rhizomes and senesced leaves (21 November 2013, 2 February 2014 and 28 April 2014). Air temperature is from the Environment Canada National Climate Data and Information Archive (Environment Canada 2015).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493780&req=5

Figure 1: Air and soil temperatures at Elora, Ontario field site, 1 October 2013–25 June 2014. (A) Mean, maximum and minimum air temperature and (B) mean soil temperature. Soil temperatures are an average of thermistors at 2cm and 8cm depth below soil surface across the field plot (n=7 for each depth). Arrows indicate harvest dates for rhizomes and senesced leaves (21 November 2013, 2 February 2014 and 28 April 2014). Air temperature is from the Environment Canada National Climate Data and Information Archive (Environment Canada 2015).
Mentions: Minimum daily air temperature at the field site fell below 0°C by the end of October 2013 and did not consistently rise above 0°C until the middle of April 2014 (Fig. 1A). Minimum air temperature was below −20°C for much of January and February 2014, and fell to seasonal minimums near −30°C on four dates in later January to February (Fig. 1A). Soil temperature followed the decline in air temperature from the beginning of September until 11 November, when temperatures at 2cm depth first fell below 0°C (Fig. 1). Following a warm front on 5 December, a cold front reduced soil temperatures to −3°C at 2cm depth and −1°C at 8cm depth. On 7 December, strong winds up to 41 km h-1 reduced soil temperatures to their coldest point of the autumn/winter season such that on the morning of 8 December, soil temperatures across the plot ranged from −0.5°C to −6.0°C at 2cm depth to −0.1°C to −3.4°C at 8cm depth. Snow accumulated shortly after this time, and stayed until approximately 4 April, with mid-winter accumulations of over 40cm (Jordan Forsyth, Elora Weather Station Manager, personal communication). Despite periodic air temperatures that fell below −25°C, soil temperatures remained near zero throughout the period of snow cover and only warmed above 0°C following complete snow melt after 6 April (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Photosynthesis and electrolyte leakage measurements in spring and summer demonstrate that S. pectinata leaves have greater frost tolerance in the field.These results indicate M. × giganteus will be unsuitable for production in continental interiors of cool-temperate climate zones unless freezing and frost tolerance are improved.By contrast, S. pectinata has the freezing and frost tolerance required for a higher-latitude bioenergy crop.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2 r.sage@utoronto.ca patrick.friesen@utoronto.ca.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus