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Metabolite fingerprinting of pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) embryos to assess active pathways during oil synthesis.

Tsogtbaatar E, Cocuron JC, Sonera MC, Alonso AP - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Secondly, these intermediates were quantified in developing pennycress embryos by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode.Finally, partitional clustering analysis grouped the intracellular metabolites that shared a similar pattern of accumulation over time into eight clusters.This study underlined that: (i) sucrose might be stored rather than cleaved into hexoses; (ii) glucose and glutamine would be the main sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively; and (iii) glycolysis, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Calvin cycle were active in developing pennycress embryos.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Ohio State University, Department of Molecular Genetics, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Metabolite clustering of pennycress embryos across different developmental stages. Metabolites were clustered using MetaboAnalyst v2.5. The black lines represent median intensities of corresponding clusters that were obtained from K-means analysis.
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Figure 4: Metabolite clustering of pennycress embryos across different developmental stages. Metabolites were clustered using MetaboAnalyst v2.5. The black lines represent median intensities of corresponding clusters that were obtained from K-means analysis.

Mentions: In order to group metabolites that share a similar pattern of accumulation over different stages of development, a partitional clustering analysis was performed using MetaboAnalyst (Xia et al., 2009, 2012). Intracellular metabolites in developing pennycress embryos were found to gather in eight clusters (Fig. 4; Table 1). The majority of compounds in cluster 1 increased from 11 to 15 DAP and then decreased; 33% of the phosphorylated metabolites grouped into this cluster. The intermediates from cluster 2, among which nine were amino acids, rapidly increased to reach a plateau at 15 DAP. Clusters 3, 5, and 7 peaked at 13, 15, and 17 DAP, respectively, and then decreased. Interestingly, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate grouped in cluster 7, and four of the organic acids grouped in cluster 5. Metabolites gradually accumulating during embryos development were gathered in cluster 4; the main sugars (glucose and sucrose), several of the most abundant amino acids (glutamine and proline), and phosphorylated compounds (UDP-glucose) were found in this cluster. Fructose was the only metabolite steadily decreasing over time, and therefore was separated from all the other intermediates (cluster 6). Finally, all the nucleotide triphosphates grouped together in cluster 8; these had a peak at 15 DAP and then reached an optimum at 21 DAP.


Metabolite fingerprinting of pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) embryos to assess active pathways during oil synthesis.

Tsogtbaatar E, Cocuron JC, Sonera MC, Alonso AP - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Metabolite clustering of pennycress embryos across different developmental stages. Metabolites were clustered using MetaboAnalyst v2.5. The black lines represent median intensities of corresponding clusters that were obtained from K-means analysis.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493779&req=5

Figure 4: Metabolite clustering of pennycress embryos across different developmental stages. Metabolites were clustered using MetaboAnalyst v2.5. The black lines represent median intensities of corresponding clusters that were obtained from K-means analysis.
Mentions: In order to group metabolites that share a similar pattern of accumulation over different stages of development, a partitional clustering analysis was performed using MetaboAnalyst (Xia et al., 2009, 2012). Intracellular metabolites in developing pennycress embryos were found to gather in eight clusters (Fig. 4; Table 1). The majority of compounds in cluster 1 increased from 11 to 15 DAP and then decreased; 33% of the phosphorylated metabolites grouped into this cluster. The intermediates from cluster 2, among which nine were amino acids, rapidly increased to reach a plateau at 15 DAP. Clusters 3, 5, and 7 peaked at 13, 15, and 17 DAP, respectively, and then decreased. Interestingly, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate grouped in cluster 7, and four of the organic acids grouped in cluster 5. Metabolites gradually accumulating during embryos development were gathered in cluster 4; the main sugars (glucose and sucrose), several of the most abundant amino acids (glutamine and proline), and phosphorylated compounds (UDP-glucose) were found in this cluster. Fructose was the only metabolite steadily decreasing over time, and therefore was separated from all the other intermediates (cluster 6). Finally, all the nucleotide triphosphates grouped together in cluster 8; these had a peak at 15 DAP and then reached an optimum at 21 DAP.

Bottom Line: Secondly, these intermediates were quantified in developing pennycress embryos by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode.Finally, partitional clustering analysis grouped the intracellular metabolites that shared a similar pattern of accumulation over time into eight clusters.This study underlined that: (i) sucrose might be stored rather than cleaved into hexoses; (ii) glucose and glutamine would be the main sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively; and (iii) glycolysis, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Calvin cycle were active in developing pennycress embryos.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Ohio State University, Department of Molecular Genetics, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

No MeSH data available.