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Cell-wall properties contributing to improved deconstruction by alkaline pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis in diverse maize (Zea mays L.) lines.

Li M, Heckwolf M, Crowe JD, Williams DL, Magee TD, Kaeppler SM, de Leon N, Hodge DB - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: The hydrolysis yield following pre-treatment exhibited statistically significant negative correlations to the lignin content after pre-treatment and positive correlations to the solubilized ferulic acid and pCA.Several unanticipated results were observed, including a positive correlation between initial lignin and acetate content, lack of correlation between acetate content and initial xylan content, and negative correlation between each of these three variables to the hydrolysis yields for untreated maize.Another surprising result was that pCA release was negatively correlated with hydrolysis yields for untreated maize and, along with ferulic acid release, was positively correlated with the pre-treated maize hydrolysis yields.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosystems & Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA DOE-Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, 1552 University Ave., Madison, WI 53703, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary of significant property correlations with glucose hydrolysis yields. Open data points represent 6h hydrolysis yields for untreated biomass; filled data points represent 72h hydrolysis yields for NaOH-pre-treated biomass. Each data point represents the value of the property and corresponding yield for one of the 27 maize lines. Pearson’s correlation coefficients and P values are presented for all property correlations with P≤0.05. Error bars on individual samples are not shown to improve clarity. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
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Figure 4: Summary of significant property correlations with glucose hydrolysis yields. Open data points represent 6h hydrolysis yields for untreated biomass; filled data points represent 72h hydrolysis yields for NaOH-pre-treated biomass. Each data point represents the value of the property and corresponding yield for one of the 27 maize lines. Pearson’s correlation coefficients and P values are presented for all property correlations with P≤0.05. Error bars on individual samples are not shown to improve clarity. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)

Mentions: Besides between-property correlations, correlations between cell-wall properties and hydrolysis yields are important for understanding property contributions to cell-wall recalcitrance. All significant (P≤0.05) correlations between cell-wall properties and hydrolysis yields are plotted in Fig. 4. Notably, this plots only shows correlations for untreated 6h yields and NaOH-pre-treated 72h yields. The untreated 72h yield did not exhibit significant correlations with any properties other than the untreated 6h yields (Fig. 2 and Table 1). However, the correlations that were strongest for the untreated 6h hydrolysis yields were not that significant for 72h digestibility, exhibiting similar correlations with P values between 0.05 and 0.15. The differences between the hydrolysis yields obtained at different time points (6 vs 72h) may indicate that the initial cell-wall composition impacts the hydrolysis rate more strongly than the hydrolysis extent. The 6h hydrolysis yields for NaOH-pre-treated corn stover were not found to exhibit strong correlations with any other properties and, furthermore, were often lower than the untreated 6h hydrolysis yields (Fig. 1B). This contradictory result may be due to the drying of the pre-treated material necessitated by the analysis that resulted in its stronger resistance to rehydration, which may have introduced more variability in the data for the initial glucose release by hydrolysis but presumably not the extent of hydrolysis.


Cell-wall properties contributing to improved deconstruction by alkaline pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis in diverse maize (Zea mays L.) lines.

Li M, Heckwolf M, Crowe JD, Williams DL, Magee TD, Kaeppler SM, de Leon N, Hodge DB - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Summary of significant property correlations with glucose hydrolysis yields. Open data points represent 6h hydrolysis yields for untreated biomass; filled data points represent 72h hydrolysis yields for NaOH-pre-treated biomass. Each data point represents the value of the property and corresponding yield for one of the 27 maize lines. Pearson’s correlation coefficients and P values are presented for all property correlations with P≤0.05. Error bars on individual samples are not shown to improve clarity. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493778&req=5

Figure 4: Summary of significant property correlations with glucose hydrolysis yields. Open data points represent 6h hydrolysis yields for untreated biomass; filled data points represent 72h hydrolysis yields for NaOH-pre-treated biomass. Each data point represents the value of the property and corresponding yield for one of the 27 maize lines. Pearson’s correlation coefficients and P values are presented for all property correlations with P≤0.05. Error bars on individual samples are not shown to improve clarity. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
Mentions: Besides between-property correlations, correlations between cell-wall properties and hydrolysis yields are important for understanding property contributions to cell-wall recalcitrance. All significant (P≤0.05) correlations between cell-wall properties and hydrolysis yields are plotted in Fig. 4. Notably, this plots only shows correlations for untreated 6h yields and NaOH-pre-treated 72h yields. The untreated 72h yield did not exhibit significant correlations with any properties other than the untreated 6h yields (Fig. 2 and Table 1). However, the correlations that were strongest for the untreated 6h hydrolysis yields were not that significant for 72h digestibility, exhibiting similar correlations with P values between 0.05 and 0.15. The differences between the hydrolysis yields obtained at different time points (6 vs 72h) may indicate that the initial cell-wall composition impacts the hydrolysis rate more strongly than the hydrolysis extent. The 6h hydrolysis yields for NaOH-pre-treated corn stover were not found to exhibit strong correlations with any other properties and, furthermore, were often lower than the untreated 6h hydrolysis yields (Fig. 1B). This contradictory result may be due to the drying of the pre-treated material necessitated by the analysis that resulted in its stronger resistance to rehydration, which may have introduced more variability in the data for the initial glucose release by hydrolysis but presumably not the extent of hydrolysis.

Bottom Line: The hydrolysis yield following pre-treatment exhibited statistically significant negative correlations to the lignin content after pre-treatment and positive correlations to the solubilized ferulic acid and pCA.Several unanticipated results were observed, including a positive correlation between initial lignin and acetate content, lack of correlation between acetate content and initial xylan content, and negative correlation between each of these three variables to the hydrolysis yields for untreated maize.Another surprising result was that pCA release was negatively correlated with hydrolysis yields for untreated maize and, along with ferulic acid release, was positively correlated with the pre-treated maize hydrolysis yields.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosystems & Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA DOE-Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, 1552 University Ave., Madison, WI 53703, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus