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Cell-wall properties contributing to improved deconstruction by alkaline pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis in diverse maize (Zea mays L.) lines.

Li M, Heckwolf M, Crowe JD, Williams DL, Magee TD, Kaeppler SM, de Leon N, Hodge DB - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: The hydrolysis yield following pre-treatment exhibited statistically significant negative correlations to the lignin content after pre-treatment and positive correlations to the solubilized ferulic acid and pCA.Several unanticipated results were observed, including a positive correlation between initial lignin and acetate content, lack of correlation between acetate content and initial xylan content, and negative correlation between each of these three variables to the hydrolysis yields for untreated maize.Another surprising result was that pCA release was negatively correlated with hydrolysis yields for untreated maize and, along with ferulic acid release, was positively correlated with the pre-treated maize hydrolysis yields.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosystems & Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA DOE-Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, 1552 University Ave., Madison, WI 53703, USA.

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Range of hydrolysis yields obtained for untreated and NaOH-pre-treated maize for 6h (A) and 72h (B) hydrolysis yields. Error bars represent data range for duplicate samples. Due to missing data, some samples do not appear. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
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Figure 1: Range of hydrolysis yields obtained for untreated and NaOH-pre-treated maize for 6h (A) and 72h (B) hydrolysis yields. Error bars represent data range for duplicate samples. Due to missing data, some samples do not appear. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)

Mentions: Twelve cell-wall properties or traits that may be indicators of cell-wall recalcitrance were quantified across the maize diversity set in addition to 6 and 72h hydrolysis yields prior to and following mild NaOH pre-treatment. The complete data set is available in Supplementary Table S3 with some of the important features describing the property data set presented in Table 1 and the yields presented in Fig. 1. As mentioned in the Introduction, WRV is proposed to act as a proxy variable that may be able to explain a number of phenomenon related to cell-wall polysaccharide accessibility to cellulolytic enzymes. As observed, untreated maize had WRVs ranging from approximately 1.9 to 2.4 with the WRV following alkaline treatment ranging from 2.3 to 3.3 (Table 1), clearly indicating a substantial increase in the cell-wall swelling and within the range for maize stover presented in our previous work (Williams and Hodge, 2014). Xylan concentration also exhibited substantial variability within the data set and increased in relative abundance from an average of 0.200 to 0.266g g–1 as a consequence of the removal of lignin and extractives. Wide ranges were observed for initial cell-wall acetyl content, pCA content, and FA content, as well as corresponding pCA and FA release. The S/G ratio as determined by py-MBMS coupled to partial least squares models also showed a diverse range, although within the range reported for maize (Morrison et al., 1998).


Cell-wall properties contributing to improved deconstruction by alkaline pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis in diverse maize (Zea mays L.) lines.

Li M, Heckwolf M, Crowe JD, Williams DL, Magee TD, Kaeppler SM, de Leon N, Hodge DB - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Range of hydrolysis yields obtained for untreated and NaOH-pre-treated maize for 6h (A) and 72h (B) hydrolysis yields. Error bars represent data range for duplicate samples. Due to missing data, some samples do not appear. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493778&req=5

Figure 1: Range of hydrolysis yields obtained for untreated and NaOH-pre-treated maize for 6h (A) and 72h (B) hydrolysis yields. Error bars represent data range for duplicate samples. Due to missing data, some samples do not appear. (This figure is available in colour at JXB online.)
Mentions: Twelve cell-wall properties or traits that may be indicators of cell-wall recalcitrance were quantified across the maize diversity set in addition to 6 and 72h hydrolysis yields prior to and following mild NaOH pre-treatment. The complete data set is available in Supplementary Table S3 with some of the important features describing the property data set presented in Table 1 and the yields presented in Fig. 1. As mentioned in the Introduction, WRV is proposed to act as a proxy variable that may be able to explain a number of phenomenon related to cell-wall polysaccharide accessibility to cellulolytic enzymes. As observed, untreated maize had WRVs ranging from approximately 1.9 to 2.4 with the WRV following alkaline treatment ranging from 2.3 to 3.3 (Table 1), clearly indicating a substantial increase in the cell-wall swelling and within the range for maize stover presented in our previous work (Williams and Hodge, 2014). Xylan concentration also exhibited substantial variability within the data set and increased in relative abundance from an average of 0.200 to 0.266g g–1 as a consequence of the removal of lignin and extractives. Wide ranges were observed for initial cell-wall acetyl content, pCA content, and FA content, as well as corresponding pCA and FA release. The S/G ratio as determined by py-MBMS coupled to partial least squares models also showed a diverse range, although within the range reported for maize (Morrison et al., 1998).

Bottom Line: The hydrolysis yield following pre-treatment exhibited statistically significant negative correlations to the lignin content after pre-treatment and positive correlations to the solubilized ferulic acid and pCA.Several unanticipated results were observed, including a positive correlation between initial lignin and acetate content, lack of correlation between acetate content and initial xylan content, and negative correlation between each of these three variables to the hydrolysis yields for untreated maize.Another surprising result was that pCA release was negatively correlated with hydrolysis yields for untreated maize and, along with ferulic acid release, was positively correlated with the pre-treated maize hydrolysis yields.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosystems & Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA DOE-Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, 1552 University Ave., Madison, WI 53703, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus