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Genetic structure of Miscanthus sinensis and Miscanthus sacchariflorus in Japan indicates a gradient of bidirectional but asymmetric introgression.

Clark LV, Stewart JR, Nishiwaki A, Toma Y, Kjeldsen JB, Jørgensen U, Zhao H, Peng J, Yoo JH, Heo K, Yu CY, Yamada T, Sacks EJ - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Bottom Line: Unexpectedly, rare (~1%) diploid M. sinensis individuals from northern Japan were found with 6-27% M. sacchariflorus ancestry.In contrast to limited introgression between diploid M. sacchariflorus and M. sinensis in northern China, selection for adaptation to a moderate maritime climate probably favoured cross-ploidy introgressants in southern Japan.These results will help guide the selection of Miscanthus accessions for the breeding of biomass cultivars.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Haplotype network of Miscanthus based upon ten plastid microsatellite markers, and maps of sampling locations of the most common haplotypes. Circle area in the network is proportional to the number of unique accessions with each haplotype, and pie slice area is proportional to the number of individuals in each DAPC group as determined by nuclear SNPs (Fig. 1A, lower bar, with corresponding colours). Msa indicates the sub-network belonging to M. sacchariflorus. The rest of the network is found in M. sinensis. The eight most common haplotypes in M. sinensis are indicated with letters. Haplotypes A, B, C, H, I, and J correspond to identically named haplotypes from Clark et al. (2014). Probable geographic origins of ornamental M. sinensis cultivars (bottom, centre) were determined by the presence of haplotypes A, B, and I and the absence of other haplotypes.
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Figure 4: Haplotype network of Miscanthus based upon ten plastid microsatellite markers, and maps of sampling locations of the most common haplotypes. Circle area in the network is proportional to the number of unique accessions with each haplotype, and pie slice area is proportional to the number of individuals in each DAPC group as determined by nuclear SNPs (Fig. 1A, lower bar, with corresponding colours). Msa indicates the sub-network belonging to M. sacchariflorus. The rest of the network is found in M. sinensis. The eight most common haplotypes in M. sinensis are indicated with letters. Haplotypes A, B, C, H, I, and J correspond to identically named haplotypes from Clark et al. (2014). Probable geographic origins of ornamental M. sinensis cultivars (bottom, centre) were determined by the presence of haplotypes A, B, and I and the absence of other haplotypes.

Mentions: Photographs of EBI-2009-02c, an M. sinensis×M. sacchariflorus individual grown from seed collected in Hokkaido, Japan. Ancestry of EBI-2009-02c according to Structure was ~73% M. sinensis from N Japan and ~27% M. sacchariflorus (Fig. 1A, C, E). Its plastid haplotype was commonly found among M. sinensis in Hokkaido (haplotype C, Fig. 4). (A) Close-up showing axillary branching and long internodes, which are characteristic of M. sacchariflorus. (B) Broader view, with more branching visible. (C–E) Abaxial leaf surface of three plants, showing presence or absence of trichomes. Scale is identical in C–E. (C) Non-hybrid M. sinensis displaying trichomes (arrow), which is typical for this species. (D) EBI-2009-02c, with trichomes (arrow). (E) Diploid non-hybrid M. sacchariflorus, with a glabrous phenotype that is typical of this species.


Genetic structure of Miscanthus sinensis and Miscanthus sacchariflorus in Japan indicates a gradient of bidirectional but asymmetric introgression.

Clark LV, Stewart JR, Nishiwaki A, Toma Y, Kjeldsen JB, Jørgensen U, Zhao H, Peng J, Yoo JH, Heo K, Yu CY, Yamada T, Sacks EJ - J. Exp. Bot. (2015)

Haplotype network of Miscanthus based upon ten plastid microsatellite markers, and maps of sampling locations of the most common haplotypes. Circle area in the network is proportional to the number of unique accessions with each haplotype, and pie slice area is proportional to the number of individuals in each DAPC group as determined by nuclear SNPs (Fig. 1A, lower bar, with corresponding colours). Msa indicates the sub-network belonging to M. sacchariflorus. The rest of the network is found in M. sinensis. The eight most common haplotypes in M. sinensis are indicated with letters. Haplotypes A, B, C, H, I, and J correspond to identically named haplotypes from Clark et al. (2014). Probable geographic origins of ornamental M. sinensis cultivars (bottom, centre) were determined by the presence of haplotypes A, B, and I and the absence of other haplotypes.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493777&req=5

Figure 4: Haplotype network of Miscanthus based upon ten plastid microsatellite markers, and maps of sampling locations of the most common haplotypes. Circle area in the network is proportional to the number of unique accessions with each haplotype, and pie slice area is proportional to the number of individuals in each DAPC group as determined by nuclear SNPs (Fig. 1A, lower bar, with corresponding colours). Msa indicates the sub-network belonging to M. sacchariflorus. The rest of the network is found in M. sinensis. The eight most common haplotypes in M. sinensis are indicated with letters. Haplotypes A, B, C, H, I, and J correspond to identically named haplotypes from Clark et al. (2014). Probable geographic origins of ornamental M. sinensis cultivars (bottom, centre) were determined by the presence of haplotypes A, B, and I and the absence of other haplotypes.
Mentions: Photographs of EBI-2009-02c, an M. sinensis×M. sacchariflorus individual grown from seed collected in Hokkaido, Japan. Ancestry of EBI-2009-02c according to Structure was ~73% M. sinensis from N Japan and ~27% M. sacchariflorus (Fig. 1A, C, E). Its plastid haplotype was commonly found among M. sinensis in Hokkaido (haplotype C, Fig. 4). (A) Close-up showing axillary branching and long internodes, which are characteristic of M. sacchariflorus. (B) Broader view, with more branching visible. (C–E) Abaxial leaf surface of three plants, showing presence or absence of trichomes. Scale is identical in C–E. (C) Non-hybrid M. sinensis displaying trichomes (arrow), which is typical for this species. (D) EBI-2009-02c, with trichomes (arrow). (E) Diploid non-hybrid M. sacchariflorus, with a glabrous phenotype that is typical of this species.

Bottom Line: Unexpectedly, rare (~1%) diploid M. sinensis individuals from northern Japan were found with 6-27% M. sacchariflorus ancestry.In contrast to limited introgression between diploid M. sacchariflorus and M. sinensis in northern China, selection for adaptation to a moderate maritime climate probably favoured cross-ploidy introgressants in southern Japan.These results will help guide the selection of Miscanthus accessions for the breeding of biomass cultivars.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus