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The apéritif effect: Alcohol's effects on the brain's response to food aromas in women.

Eiler WJ, Džemidžić M, Case KR, Soeurt CM, Armstrong CL, Mattes RD, O'Connor SJ, Harezlak J, Acton AJ, Considine RV, Kareken DA - Obesity (Silver Spring) (2015)

Bottom Line: This greater food consumption may result from increased activity in brain regions that mediate reward and regulate feeding behavior.Food consumption was significantly greater, and levels of ghrelin were reduced, following alcohol.The hypothalamus may mediate the interplay of alcohol and responses to food cues, thus playing a role in the apéritif phenomenon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

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Circulating GhrelinMean circulating ghrelin pre- and post-intravenous infusion of either alcohol or saline, with ghrelin showing a marked reduction following alcohol administration. †, p < 0.001.
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Figure 2: Circulating GhrelinMean circulating ghrelin pre- and post-intravenous infusion of either alcohol or saline, with ghrelin showing a marked reduction following alcohol administration. †, p < 0.001.

Mentions: Linear mixed models (Session [EtOH, Saline] × Time [Pre-Infusion, Post-Infusion]) of plasma glucose, insulin, and ghrelin (analyzed separately) revealed main effects of Time (ps<0.002) for all, with each decreasing when compared to the pre-infusion measurement; with no effect of Time observed for leptin (p=0.83). A significant effect of Session (p<0.001) was present for ghrelin, with alcohol significantly decreasing ghrelin (p<0.001), but not saline (p=0.12; Figure 2). A significant effect of Session was present for leptin (p<0.001); however, post-hoc analysis revealed no significant effect of alcohol infusion (p>0.05).


The apéritif effect: Alcohol's effects on the brain's response to food aromas in women.

Eiler WJ, Džemidžić M, Case KR, Soeurt CM, Armstrong CL, Mattes RD, O'Connor SJ, Harezlak J, Acton AJ, Considine RV, Kareken DA - Obesity (Silver Spring) (2015)

Circulating GhrelinMean circulating ghrelin pre- and post-intravenous infusion of either alcohol or saline, with ghrelin showing a marked reduction following alcohol administration. †, p < 0.001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493764&req=5

Figure 2: Circulating GhrelinMean circulating ghrelin pre- and post-intravenous infusion of either alcohol or saline, with ghrelin showing a marked reduction following alcohol administration. †, p < 0.001.
Mentions: Linear mixed models (Session [EtOH, Saline] × Time [Pre-Infusion, Post-Infusion]) of plasma glucose, insulin, and ghrelin (analyzed separately) revealed main effects of Time (ps<0.002) for all, with each decreasing when compared to the pre-infusion measurement; with no effect of Time observed for leptin (p=0.83). A significant effect of Session (p<0.001) was present for ghrelin, with alcohol significantly decreasing ghrelin (p<0.001), but not saline (p=0.12; Figure 2). A significant effect of Session was present for leptin (p<0.001); however, post-hoc analysis revealed no significant effect of alcohol infusion (p>0.05).

Bottom Line: This greater food consumption may result from increased activity in brain regions that mediate reward and regulate feeding behavior.Food consumption was significantly greater, and levels of ghrelin were reduced, following alcohol.The hypothalamus may mediate the interplay of alcohol and responses to food cues, thus playing a role in the apéritif phenomenon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

Show MeSH