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Magnesium and Ketamine Gargle and Postoperative Sore Throat.

Teymourian H, Mohajerani SA, Farahbod A - Anesth Pain Med (2015)

Bottom Line: There were no significant differences between age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) between two groups of patients.Hemodynamics of patients, including blood pressure, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation %, and conscious state were not significantly different (P > 0.05).Magnesium at low dose decreases sore throat and pain severity more effectively compared to ketamine gargle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Shohada Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Postoperative sore throat is one of the most common complications after endotracheal intubation. Both Ketamine and magnesium can block N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors and provide central and local analgesia.

Objectives: To compare the effect of magnesium sulfate and ketamine gargle on the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat.

Patients and methods: A total of 100 patients candidate for emergency acute appendicitis surgery were enrolled in the study. Patients in ketamine group received ketamine gargle (0.5 mg/kg) and magnesium group received magnesium sulfate gargle (20 mg/kg up to 30 mL dextrose water 20%) 15 minutes before the operation. Patient complaint of postoperative sore throat, and its severity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) were recorded at baseline in recovery room, and then 2, 4, and 24 hours after operation.

Results: There were no significant differences between age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) between two groups of patients. Hemodynamics of patients, including blood pressure, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation %, and conscious state were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Number of patients with sore throat were significantly lower in magnesium group compared to ketamine group at 2 (P = 0.032), 4 (P = 0.02), and 24 hours (P = 0.01) after the operation. Sore throat pain score (VAS) was significantly lower in magnesium group compared to ketamine group at 2 (P = 0.019), 4 (P = 0.028), and 24 hours (P = 0.014) after the operation.

Conclusions: Magnesium at low dose decreases sore throat and pain severity more effectively compared to ketamine gargle.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Incidence of Postoperative Sore Throat in Two Groups at Different Time Points After Administration of Magnesium or Ketamine Gargle
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fig19159: Incidence of Postoperative Sore Throat in Two Groups at Different Time Points After Administration of Magnesium or Ketamine Gargle

Mentions: A total of 100 patients were included in the study and randomly assigned to one of the groups. Fifty patients received ketamine and 50 received magnesium. There were no significant differences between two groups of patients with respect to age, sex, and BMI (Table 1). Duration of surgery was not significantly different between two groups (P = 0.032). Hemodynamics of patients was also compared and blood pressure, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation %, and conscious state were not significantly different between two groups (Table 2). Incidence of postoperative sore throat in two groups after using magnesium or ketamine gargle were not significantly different at arrival in the recovery ward (P = 0.085). However, number of patients with sore throat were significantly lower in the magnesium group compared to ketamine group at 2 (P = 0.032), 4 (P = 0.02), and 24 hours (P = 0.01) after operation (Chi-square test). It seems that magnesium had longer time effective analgesia than that of the ketamine (Figure 1). Sore throat pain score was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) was not significantly different between two groups of study at 0 hour (P = 0.013). However, sore throat pain score (VAS) was significantly lower in magnesium group compared to ketamine group at 2 (P = 0.019), 4 (P = 0.028), and 24 hours (P = 0.014) after operation (Figure 2).


Magnesium and Ketamine Gargle and Postoperative Sore Throat.

Teymourian H, Mohajerani SA, Farahbod A - Anesth Pain Med (2015)

Incidence of Postoperative Sore Throat in Two Groups at Different Time Points After Administration of Magnesium or Ketamine Gargle
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493740&req=5

fig19159: Incidence of Postoperative Sore Throat in Two Groups at Different Time Points After Administration of Magnesium or Ketamine Gargle
Mentions: A total of 100 patients were included in the study and randomly assigned to one of the groups. Fifty patients received ketamine and 50 received magnesium. There were no significant differences between two groups of patients with respect to age, sex, and BMI (Table 1). Duration of surgery was not significantly different between two groups (P = 0.032). Hemodynamics of patients was also compared and blood pressure, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation %, and conscious state were not significantly different between two groups (Table 2). Incidence of postoperative sore throat in two groups after using magnesium or ketamine gargle were not significantly different at arrival in the recovery ward (P = 0.085). However, number of patients with sore throat were significantly lower in the magnesium group compared to ketamine group at 2 (P = 0.032), 4 (P = 0.02), and 24 hours (P = 0.01) after operation (Chi-square test). It seems that magnesium had longer time effective analgesia than that of the ketamine (Figure 1). Sore throat pain score was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) was not significantly different between two groups of study at 0 hour (P = 0.013). However, sore throat pain score (VAS) was significantly lower in magnesium group compared to ketamine group at 2 (P = 0.019), 4 (P = 0.028), and 24 hours (P = 0.014) after operation (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: There were no significant differences between age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) between two groups of patients.Hemodynamics of patients, including blood pressure, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation %, and conscious state were not significantly different (P > 0.05).Magnesium at low dose decreases sore throat and pain severity more effectively compared to ketamine gargle.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Shohada Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Postoperative sore throat is one of the most common complications after endotracheal intubation. Both Ketamine and magnesium can block N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors and provide central and local analgesia.

Objectives: To compare the effect of magnesium sulfate and ketamine gargle on the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat.

Patients and methods: A total of 100 patients candidate for emergency acute appendicitis surgery were enrolled in the study. Patients in ketamine group received ketamine gargle (0.5 mg/kg) and magnesium group received magnesium sulfate gargle (20 mg/kg up to 30 mL dextrose water 20%) 15 minutes before the operation. Patient complaint of postoperative sore throat, and its severity measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) were recorded at baseline in recovery room, and then 2, 4, and 24 hours after operation.

Results: There were no significant differences between age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) between two groups of patients. Hemodynamics of patients, including blood pressure, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation %, and conscious state were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Number of patients with sore throat were significantly lower in magnesium group compared to ketamine group at 2 (P = 0.032), 4 (P = 0.02), and 24 hours (P = 0.01) after the operation. Sore throat pain score (VAS) was significantly lower in magnesium group compared to ketamine group at 2 (P = 0.019), 4 (P = 0.028), and 24 hours (P = 0.014) after the operation.

Conclusions: Magnesium at low dose decreases sore throat and pain severity more effectively compared to ketamine gargle.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus