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Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Assessment: Education May Improve but not Guarantee the Safety of Palpation Technique.

Seyed Siamdoust SA, Mohseni M, Memarian A - Anesth Pain Med (2015)

Bottom Line: The mean ETCP after the in vitro survey was significantly lower than the mean ETCP before the intervention (45 ± 13 vs. 51 ± 15 cm H2O, P = 0.002).The rate of measurements within the safe pressure limits significantly improved after the in vitro education (24.2% vs. 39.7%, P = 0.002).Implementing educational programs with the introduction of estimation techniques besides the use of manometer as a standard intraoperative monitoring will improve the safety of the practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Hazrat Fatemeh Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure (ETCP) should be kept in the range of 20 - 30 cm H2O. Earlier studies suggested that ETCP assessment by palpation of pilot balloon results in overinflation or underinflation and subsequent complications such as tracheal wall damage and aspiration.

Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of an in vitro educational program on the ability of anesthesia personnel to inflate Endotracheal Tube Cuffs (ETT) within safe pressure limits.

Patients and methods: The survey included two series of blinded ETCP measurements in intubated patients before and two weeks after an in vitro educational intervention. The in vitro educational program included two separate trials. The anesthesia personnel were asked to inflate an ETT cuff inserted in a tracheal model using their usual inflation technique. In the same session, six ETTs at different pressure levels were examined by the participants and their estimation of ETCP was recorded. After the in vitro assessment, the participants were informed about the actual pressure of the in vitro ETCPs and were allowed to train their fingers by in vitro pilot balloon palpation with validated manometer measurements.

Results: The mean ETCP after the in vitro survey was significantly lower than the mean ETCP before the intervention (45 ± 13 vs. 51 ± 15 cm H2O, P = 0.002). The rate of measurements within the safe pressure limits significantly improved after the in vitro education (24.2% vs. 39.7%, P = 0.002).

Conclusions: Implementing educational programs with the introduction of estimation techniques besides the use of manometer as a standard intraoperative monitoring will improve the safety of the practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The Three-Stage Protocol of the Study
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fig19726: The Three-Stage Protocol of the Study

Mentions: The local ethics committee approved the study protocol (Figure 1). The survey included two series of ETCP measurements in the intubated patients before and after an in vitro educational intervention. In the first step, the ETCP in 128 intubated patients was measured, where the anesthesia personnel were unaware of the survey. Thereafter, 52 anesthesia personnel (anesthetists, anesthesia residents, and technicians) were asked to inflate an ETT cuff inserted in a tracheal model with their usual inflation technique. The pressure of inflated cuffs was measured using a manometer. In the same session, the ability of anesthesia staff to estimate the ETCPs in a series of six ETTs with different cuff pressures was evaluated. After the assessment, the participants were informed about the actual ETCPs and were allowed to train their fingers by in vitro pilot balloon palpation with validated manometer measurements. Two weeks later, the ETCPs in 126 intubated patients were measured, where the anesthesia personnel were unaware of the measurements. Details of assessments followed.


Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Assessment: Education May Improve but not Guarantee the Safety of Palpation Technique.

Seyed Siamdoust SA, Mohseni M, Memarian A - Anesth Pain Med (2015)

The Three-Stage Protocol of the Study
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493730&req=5

fig19726: The Three-Stage Protocol of the Study
Mentions: The local ethics committee approved the study protocol (Figure 1). The survey included two series of ETCP measurements in the intubated patients before and after an in vitro educational intervention. In the first step, the ETCP in 128 intubated patients was measured, where the anesthesia personnel were unaware of the survey. Thereafter, 52 anesthesia personnel (anesthetists, anesthesia residents, and technicians) were asked to inflate an ETT cuff inserted in a tracheal model with their usual inflation technique. The pressure of inflated cuffs was measured using a manometer. In the same session, the ability of anesthesia staff to estimate the ETCPs in a series of six ETTs with different cuff pressures was evaluated. After the assessment, the participants were informed about the actual ETCPs and were allowed to train their fingers by in vitro pilot balloon palpation with validated manometer measurements. Two weeks later, the ETCPs in 126 intubated patients were measured, where the anesthesia personnel were unaware of the measurements. Details of assessments followed.

Bottom Line: The mean ETCP after the in vitro survey was significantly lower than the mean ETCP before the intervention (45 ± 13 vs. 51 ± 15 cm H2O, P = 0.002).The rate of measurements within the safe pressure limits significantly improved after the in vitro education (24.2% vs. 39.7%, P = 0.002).Implementing educational programs with the introduction of estimation techniques besides the use of manometer as a standard intraoperative monitoring will improve the safety of the practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, Hazrat Fatemeh Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure (ETCP) should be kept in the range of 20 - 30 cm H2O. Earlier studies suggested that ETCP assessment by palpation of pilot balloon results in overinflation or underinflation and subsequent complications such as tracheal wall damage and aspiration.

Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the effect of an in vitro educational program on the ability of anesthesia personnel to inflate Endotracheal Tube Cuffs (ETT) within safe pressure limits.

Patients and methods: The survey included two series of blinded ETCP measurements in intubated patients before and two weeks after an in vitro educational intervention. The in vitro educational program included two separate trials. The anesthesia personnel were asked to inflate an ETT cuff inserted in a tracheal model using their usual inflation technique. In the same session, six ETTs at different pressure levels were examined by the participants and their estimation of ETCP was recorded. After the in vitro assessment, the participants were informed about the actual pressure of the in vitro ETCPs and were allowed to train their fingers by in vitro pilot balloon palpation with validated manometer measurements.

Results: The mean ETCP after the in vitro survey was significantly lower than the mean ETCP before the intervention (45 ± 13 vs. 51 ± 15 cm H2O, P = 0.002). The rate of measurements within the safe pressure limits significantly improved after the in vitro education (24.2% vs. 39.7%, P = 0.002).

Conclusions: Implementing educational programs with the introduction of estimation techniques besides the use of manometer as a standard intraoperative monitoring will improve the safety of the practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus