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Insulin sensitivity index (ISI0, 120) potentially linked to carbon isotopes of breath CO2 for pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

Ghosh C, Mukhopadhyay P, Ghosh S, Pradhan M - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Conversely, the strongest correlation was observed between 1/ISI0,120 and breath CO2 isotopes.Consequently, we determined several optimal diagnostic cut-off points of 1/ISI0,120 and (13)CO2/(12)CO2-isotope ratios to distinctively track the evolution of PD prior to the onset of T2D.Our findings suggest that isotopic breath CO2 is a novel method for accurate estimation of ISI0,120 and thus may open new perspectives into the isotope-specific non-invasive evaluation of insulin resistance for large-scale real-time diabetes screening purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Salt Lake, JD Block, Sector III, Kolkata-700098, India.

ABSTRACT
New strategies for an accurate and early detection of insulin resistance are important to delay or prevent the acute onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Currently, insulin sensitivity index (ISI0,120) is considered to be a viable invasive method of whole-body insulin resistance for use in clinical settings in comparison with other invasive sensitivity indexes like homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI). To investigate how these sensitivity indexes link the (13)C/(12)C-carbon isotopes of exhaled breath CO2 to pre-diabetes (PD) and type 2 diabetes in response to glucose ingestion, we studied excretion dynamics of (13)C/(12)C-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2. Here, we show that (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios of breath CO2 were well correlated with blood glucose, insulin, glycosylated-hemoglobin as well as with HOMA-IR and 1/QUICKI. Conversely, the strongest correlation was observed between 1/ISI0,120 and breath CO2 isotopes. Consequently, we determined several optimal diagnostic cut-off points of 1/ISI0,120 and (13)CO2/(12)CO2-isotope ratios to distinctively track the evolution of PD prior to the onset of T2D. Our findings suggest that isotopic breath CO2 is a novel method for accurate estimation of ISI0,120 and thus may open new perspectives into the isotope-specific non-invasive evaluation of insulin resistance for large-scale real-time diabetes screening purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kinetics study of breath carbon-13 isotope excretions and blood glucose levels after administration of 13C-glucose.a, Breath δDOB13C (‰) enrichments. b, blood glucose concentrations for normal (NDC), pre-diabetes (PD) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) individuals at every 30 min interval during 5 h-OGTT. *indicates statistically significant difference (p < 0.05). Data are expressed in terms of mean ± SEM.
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f1: Kinetics study of breath carbon-13 isotope excretions and blood glucose levels after administration of 13C-glucose.a, Breath δDOB13C (‰) enrichments. b, blood glucose concentrations for normal (NDC), pre-diabetes (PD) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) individuals at every 30 min interval during 5 h-OGTT. *indicates statistically significant difference (p < 0.05). Data are expressed in terms of mean ± SEM.

Mentions: We initially investigated the time-dependent excretion kinetics of stable carbon-13 isotopes, expressed as δDOB13C(t)‰ values, in exhaled breath samples by ICOS method to investigate the distribution of 13CO2 isotopic abundance in breath samples associated with isotopically labelled glucose metabolism for NDC (non-diabetic control), PD and T2D and the results have been illustrated in Fig. 1a. We observed that the mean δDOB13C(t)‰ values for the group with T2D were significantly lower (p < 0.01) compared to the groups with PD and NDC between 90 min and 210 min after the glucose load. These findings suggest that carbon isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 is capable of detecting marked differences in δDOB13C(t)‰ values in exhaled breath samples within 90 min of a 5 h-OGTT among the groups with NDC, PD and T2D. However, there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) in mean δDOB13C(t)‰ values among all the groups from 240 min in response to glucose ingestion. We also simultaneously studied how the concentration of blood glucose changes with time in response to oral glucose ingestion.


Insulin sensitivity index (ISI0, 120) potentially linked to carbon isotopes of breath CO2 for pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

Ghosh C, Mukhopadhyay P, Ghosh S, Pradhan M - Sci Rep (2015)

Kinetics study of breath carbon-13 isotope excretions and blood glucose levels after administration of 13C-glucose.a, Breath δDOB13C (‰) enrichments. b, blood glucose concentrations for normal (NDC), pre-diabetes (PD) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) individuals at every 30 min interval during 5 h-OGTT. *indicates statistically significant difference (p < 0.05). Data are expressed in terms of mean ± SEM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493706&req=5

f1: Kinetics study of breath carbon-13 isotope excretions and blood glucose levels after administration of 13C-glucose.a, Breath δDOB13C (‰) enrichments. b, blood glucose concentrations for normal (NDC), pre-diabetes (PD) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) individuals at every 30 min interval during 5 h-OGTT. *indicates statistically significant difference (p < 0.05). Data are expressed in terms of mean ± SEM.
Mentions: We initially investigated the time-dependent excretion kinetics of stable carbon-13 isotopes, expressed as δDOB13C(t)‰ values, in exhaled breath samples by ICOS method to investigate the distribution of 13CO2 isotopic abundance in breath samples associated with isotopically labelled glucose metabolism for NDC (non-diabetic control), PD and T2D and the results have been illustrated in Fig. 1a. We observed that the mean δDOB13C(t)‰ values for the group with T2D were significantly lower (p < 0.01) compared to the groups with PD and NDC between 90 min and 210 min after the glucose load. These findings suggest that carbon isotopic fractionations of breath CO2 is capable of detecting marked differences in δDOB13C(t)‰ values in exhaled breath samples within 90 min of a 5 h-OGTT among the groups with NDC, PD and T2D. However, there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) in mean δDOB13C(t)‰ values among all the groups from 240 min in response to glucose ingestion. We also simultaneously studied how the concentration of blood glucose changes with time in response to oral glucose ingestion.

Bottom Line: Conversely, the strongest correlation was observed between 1/ISI0,120 and breath CO2 isotopes.Consequently, we determined several optimal diagnostic cut-off points of 1/ISI0,120 and (13)CO2/(12)CO2-isotope ratios to distinctively track the evolution of PD prior to the onset of T2D.Our findings suggest that isotopic breath CO2 is a novel method for accurate estimation of ISI0,120 and thus may open new perspectives into the isotope-specific non-invasive evaluation of insulin resistance for large-scale real-time diabetes screening purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Salt Lake, JD Block, Sector III, Kolkata-700098, India.

ABSTRACT
New strategies for an accurate and early detection of insulin resistance are important to delay or prevent the acute onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Currently, insulin sensitivity index (ISI0,120) is considered to be a viable invasive method of whole-body insulin resistance for use in clinical settings in comparison with other invasive sensitivity indexes like homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI). To investigate how these sensitivity indexes link the (13)C/(12)C-carbon isotopes of exhaled breath CO2 to pre-diabetes (PD) and type 2 diabetes in response to glucose ingestion, we studied excretion dynamics of (13)C/(12)C-isotopic fractionations of breath CO2. Here, we show that (13)C/(12)C-isotope ratios of breath CO2 were well correlated with blood glucose, insulin, glycosylated-hemoglobin as well as with HOMA-IR and 1/QUICKI. Conversely, the strongest correlation was observed between 1/ISI0,120 and breath CO2 isotopes. Consequently, we determined several optimal diagnostic cut-off points of 1/ISI0,120 and (13)CO2/(12)CO2-isotope ratios to distinctively track the evolution of PD prior to the onset of T2D. Our findings suggest that isotopic breath CO2 is a novel method for accurate estimation of ISI0,120 and thus may open new perspectives into the isotope-specific non-invasive evaluation of insulin resistance for large-scale real-time diabetes screening purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus