Limits...
In situ microscopic observation of chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls in hydrothermal conditions.

Deguchi S, Tsujii K, Horikoshi K - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Recent findings of intact chitin in fossil records suggest surprisingly high recalcitrance of this biopolymer during hydrothermal treatments.We also know in the experience of everyday life that mushroom, cells of which have chitinous cell walls, do not fall apart however long they are simmered.The results show very hot and compressed water is needed to make mushrooms mushy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Recent findings of intact chitin in fossil records suggest surprisingly high recalcitrance of this biopolymer during hydrothermal treatments. We also know in the experience of everyday life that mushroom, cells of which have chitinous cell walls, do not fall apart however long they are simmered. We used in situ optical microscopy to examine chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls during hydrothermal treatments, and obtained direct evidence that they remained undegraded at temperatures well over 200 °C. The results show very hot and compressed water is needed to make mushrooms mushy.

No MeSH data available.


Change of the size of a C. liquefaciens cell as a function of temperature.Insets show microscopic images corresponding to the temperature of the data points indicated by arrows. Each images are 26 μm × 26 μm. A video clip showing the whole process is available in Movie S2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493705&req=5

f2: Change of the size of a C. liquefaciens cell as a function of temperature.Insets show microscopic images corresponding to the temperature of the data points indicated by arrows. Each images are 26 μm × 26 μm. A video clip showing the whole process is available in Movie S2.

Mentions: When C. liquefaciens cells were heated in water from room temperature, spherical cells shrank slightly at around 120 °C. A typical example is shown in Fig. 2, in which the diameter of a cell, which was obtained by analysing images by image analysis software, is plotted against temperature together with selected microscopic images. In this particular case, the diameter of the cell abruptly decreased from 5.3 μm to 4.7 μm at temperatures between 112 °C and 117 °C. The shrinkage was observed for all the cells examined (see Movie S2). For the majority of the cells, the shrinkage occurred within a narrow temperature range between 115 and 120 °C (Figure S2).


In situ microscopic observation of chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls in hydrothermal conditions.

Deguchi S, Tsujii K, Horikoshi K - Sci Rep (2015)

Change of the size of a C. liquefaciens cell as a function of temperature.Insets show microscopic images corresponding to the temperature of the data points indicated by arrows. Each images are 26 μm × 26 μm. A video clip showing the whole process is available in Movie S2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493705&req=5

f2: Change of the size of a C. liquefaciens cell as a function of temperature.Insets show microscopic images corresponding to the temperature of the data points indicated by arrows. Each images are 26 μm × 26 μm. A video clip showing the whole process is available in Movie S2.
Mentions: When C. liquefaciens cells were heated in water from room temperature, spherical cells shrank slightly at around 120 °C. A typical example is shown in Fig. 2, in which the diameter of a cell, which was obtained by analysing images by image analysis software, is plotted against temperature together with selected microscopic images. In this particular case, the diameter of the cell abruptly decreased from 5.3 μm to 4.7 μm at temperatures between 112 °C and 117 °C. The shrinkage was observed for all the cells examined (see Movie S2). For the majority of the cells, the shrinkage occurred within a narrow temperature range between 115 and 120 °C (Figure S2).

Bottom Line: Recent findings of intact chitin in fossil records suggest surprisingly high recalcitrance of this biopolymer during hydrothermal treatments.We also know in the experience of everyday life that mushroom, cells of which have chitinous cell walls, do not fall apart however long they are simmered.The results show very hot and compressed water is needed to make mushrooms mushy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka 237-0061, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Recent findings of intact chitin in fossil records suggest surprisingly high recalcitrance of this biopolymer during hydrothermal treatments. We also know in the experience of everyday life that mushroom, cells of which have chitinous cell walls, do not fall apart however long they are simmered. We used in situ optical microscopy to examine chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls during hydrothermal treatments, and obtained direct evidence that they remained undegraded at temperatures well over 200 °C. The results show very hot and compressed water is needed to make mushrooms mushy.

No MeSH data available.