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Dielectric Optical-Controllable Magnifying Lens by Nonlinear Negative Refraction.

Cao J, Shang C, Zheng Y, Feng Y, Chen X, Liang X, Wan W - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices.However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication.Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China.

ABSTRACT
A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices. Recent advancements in nanotechnology enable novel lenses, such as, superlens and hyperlens, with sub-wavelength resolution capabilities by specially designed materials' refractive indices with meta-materials and transformation optics. However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication. Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images. Moreover, we transform a nonlinear flat lens into a magnifying lens by introducing transformation optics into the nonlinear regime, achieving an all-optical controllable lensing effect through nonlinear wave mixing, which may have many potential applications in microscopy and imaging science.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Optical controlling a nonlinear magnifying flat lens.a,d, Schematic of a nonlinear magnifying flat lens with the pump distance F1 = −10 cm, F2 = −6 cm. b,c, Magnified images of the gratings formed by the nonlinear magnifying flat lens in a with magnification 1.31. e,f, Magnified images of the gratings formed by the nonlinear magnifying flat lens in d with magnification 1.58. The scale bar is 10 μm.
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f6: Optical controlling a nonlinear magnifying flat lens.a,d, Schematic of a nonlinear magnifying flat lens with the pump distance F1 = −10 cm, F2 = −6 cm. b,c, Magnified images of the gratings formed by the nonlinear magnifying flat lens in a with magnification 1.31. e,f, Magnified images of the gratings formed by the nonlinear magnifying flat lens in d with magnification 1.58. The scale bar is 10 μm.

Mentions: At last, we show the most interesting feature by this transformed nonlinear lens: optical controlled magnification. Note that compared to Equ. (2), Equation (3) contains the effective focal length F, which can be tunable by tuning the divergence point of the pump beam, effectively optically controlling the nonlinear lens’ focal length. By varying this effective focus, we can control the magnification of the formed images. For example, we experimentally can increase the magnification to 1.58 from 1.31 in Fig. 6b,c,e,f by decreasing F from −10 cm to −6 cm. This create the first example ever of an optical controllable lens, as all previous works involves mostly with liquid crystal, thermal effect or deformed liquid lenses272829, which could have slow responsibility. Such optical controllable devices may trigger new applications in imaging science.


Dielectric Optical-Controllable Magnifying Lens by Nonlinear Negative Refraction.

Cao J, Shang C, Zheng Y, Feng Y, Chen X, Liang X, Wan W - Sci Rep (2015)

Optical controlling a nonlinear magnifying flat lens.a,d, Schematic of a nonlinear magnifying flat lens with the pump distance F1 = −10 cm, F2 = −6 cm. b,c, Magnified images of the gratings formed by the nonlinear magnifying flat lens in a with magnification 1.31. e,f, Magnified images of the gratings formed by the nonlinear magnifying flat lens in d with magnification 1.58. The scale bar is 10 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493703&req=5

f6: Optical controlling a nonlinear magnifying flat lens.a,d, Schematic of a nonlinear magnifying flat lens with the pump distance F1 = −10 cm, F2 = −6 cm. b,c, Magnified images of the gratings formed by the nonlinear magnifying flat lens in a with magnification 1.31. e,f, Magnified images of the gratings formed by the nonlinear magnifying flat lens in d with magnification 1.58. The scale bar is 10 μm.
Mentions: At last, we show the most interesting feature by this transformed nonlinear lens: optical controlled magnification. Note that compared to Equ. (2), Equation (3) contains the effective focal length F, which can be tunable by tuning the divergence point of the pump beam, effectively optically controlling the nonlinear lens’ focal length. By varying this effective focus, we can control the magnification of the formed images. For example, we experimentally can increase the magnification to 1.58 from 1.31 in Fig. 6b,c,e,f by decreasing F from −10 cm to −6 cm. This create the first example ever of an optical controllable lens, as all previous works involves mostly with liquid crystal, thermal effect or deformed liquid lenses272829, which could have slow responsibility. Such optical controllable devices may trigger new applications in imaging science.

Bottom Line: A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices.However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication.Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China.

ABSTRACT
A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices. Recent advancements in nanotechnology enable novel lenses, such as, superlens and hyperlens, with sub-wavelength resolution capabilities by specially designed materials' refractive indices with meta-materials and transformation optics. However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication. Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images. Moreover, we transform a nonlinear flat lens into a magnifying lens by introducing transformation optics into the nonlinear regime, achieving an all-optical controllable lensing effect through nonlinear wave mixing, which may have many potential applications in microscopy and imaging science.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus