Limits...
Synchronization to a bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory.

Gan L, Huang Y, Zhou L, Qian C, Wu X - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat.This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific.Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Building 313, 135 Xingang west road, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 510275.

ABSTRACT
Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat. It has been established for over a century that beat synchronization is less stable for the visual than for the auditory modality. This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific. Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome. This finding challenges the auditory advantage of beat synchronization, and has important implications for the understanding of the biological substrates of beat synchronization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results of experiment 2.Tapping to the visual bouncing ball sequence was less stable than tapping to the auditory tone sequence for the short 300 ms IOI, whereas the reverse pattern was exhibited for larger IOIs. The conventions are as in Fig. 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493690&req=5

f3: Results of experiment 2.Tapping to the visual bouncing ball sequence was less stable than tapping to the auditory tone sequence for the short 300 ms IOI, whereas the reverse pattern was exhibited for larger IOIs. The conventions are as in Fig. 2.

Mentions: Since realistically moving visual stimuli were capable of improving synchronization to a visual beat, unrealistically moving visual stimuli could decrease synchronization to a visual beat. This was observed when the IOI was reduced to 300 ms (Fig. 3) in experiment 2. All subjects verbally described the 300 ms IOI visual bouncing ball sequence as “unnaturally fast”, and its associated tapping (mean stability = 0.630) was less stable than tapping to the corresponding auditory tone sequence (mean stability = 0.891) (t13 = 4.314, pcorrected = 0.004, η2 = 0.589). The poor synchronization performance for the visual bouncing ball sequence was specific to the short 300 ms IOI and was not observed for longer IOIs that ranged from 500 to 900 ms (Table 1), which replicated the above results of the 600 and 900 ms IOIs in experiment 1. Note that the poorer synchronization performance for a flash of light (e.g., the visual flashing ball sequence in the present study) than for an auditory metronome is observed for all IOIs rather than only the short 300 ms IOI2. A two-way ANOVA with the factors sequence type (two sequence types) and IOI type (four IOI types) showed significant interaction between the two factors (F3,39 = 19.292, p = 0.001, partial η2 = 0.597), which was consistent with the above observation that the auditory advantage was only for the 300 ms IOI, but not for the longer IOIs. In addition, the ANOVA showed significant main effects for sequence type (F1,13 = 13.924, p = 0.003, partial η2 = 0.517) and IOI type (F3,39 = 35.167, p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.730). While the subjects reported that the 300 ms IOI bouncing ball sequence looked unnatural, the mechanism of the poor performance needs to be further determined. For example, the movement for the 300 ms IOI was less smooth than that for the longer IOIs (although the movement discontinuities at the lowest ball positions were carefully controlled for the 300 ms IOI sequence, see the Methods below), which might also contribute to the poor synchronization performance in the fastest bouncing ball condition.


Synchronization to a bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory.

Gan L, Huang Y, Zhou L, Qian C, Wu X - Sci Rep (2015)

Results of experiment 2.Tapping to the visual bouncing ball sequence was less stable than tapping to the auditory tone sequence for the short 300 ms IOI, whereas the reverse pattern was exhibited for larger IOIs. The conventions are as in Fig. 2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493690&req=5

f3: Results of experiment 2.Tapping to the visual bouncing ball sequence was less stable than tapping to the auditory tone sequence for the short 300 ms IOI, whereas the reverse pattern was exhibited for larger IOIs. The conventions are as in Fig. 2.
Mentions: Since realistically moving visual stimuli were capable of improving synchronization to a visual beat, unrealistically moving visual stimuli could decrease synchronization to a visual beat. This was observed when the IOI was reduced to 300 ms (Fig. 3) in experiment 2. All subjects verbally described the 300 ms IOI visual bouncing ball sequence as “unnaturally fast”, and its associated tapping (mean stability = 0.630) was less stable than tapping to the corresponding auditory tone sequence (mean stability = 0.891) (t13 = 4.314, pcorrected = 0.004, η2 = 0.589). The poor synchronization performance for the visual bouncing ball sequence was specific to the short 300 ms IOI and was not observed for longer IOIs that ranged from 500 to 900 ms (Table 1), which replicated the above results of the 600 and 900 ms IOIs in experiment 1. Note that the poorer synchronization performance for a flash of light (e.g., the visual flashing ball sequence in the present study) than for an auditory metronome is observed for all IOIs rather than only the short 300 ms IOI2. A two-way ANOVA with the factors sequence type (two sequence types) and IOI type (four IOI types) showed significant interaction between the two factors (F3,39 = 19.292, p = 0.001, partial η2 = 0.597), which was consistent with the above observation that the auditory advantage was only for the 300 ms IOI, but not for the longer IOIs. In addition, the ANOVA showed significant main effects for sequence type (F1,13 = 13.924, p = 0.003, partial η2 = 0.517) and IOI type (F3,39 = 35.167, p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.730). While the subjects reported that the 300 ms IOI bouncing ball sequence looked unnatural, the mechanism of the poor performance needs to be further determined. For example, the movement for the 300 ms IOI was less smooth than that for the longer IOIs (although the movement discontinuities at the lowest ball positions were carefully controlled for the 300 ms IOI sequence, see the Methods below), which might also contribute to the poor synchronization performance in the fastest bouncing ball condition.

Bottom Line: Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat.This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific.Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Building 313, 135 Xingang west road, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 510275.

ABSTRACT
Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat. It has been established for over a century that beat synchronization is less stable for the visual than for the auditory modality. This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific. Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome. This finding challenges the auditory advantage of beat synchronization, and has important implications for the understanding of the biological substrates of beat synchronization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus