Limits...
Synchronization to a bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory.

Gan L, Huang Y, Zhou L, Qian C, Wu X - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat.This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific.Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Building 313, 135 Xingang west road, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 510275.

ABSTRACT
Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat. It has been established for over a century that beat synchronization is less stable for the visual than for the auditory modality. This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific. Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome. This finding challenges the auditory advantage of beat synchronization, and has important implications for the understanding of the biological substrates of beat synchronization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results of experiment 1.Tapping was most stable for the visual bouncing ball sequence. The mean synchronization stabilities are indicated by the large gray marks. The data from individual subjects are indicated by the small marks of different colors, which indicate different subjects. AT, VF and VB represent the auditory tone sequence, visual flashing ball sequence, and visual bouncing ball sequence, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493690&req=5

f2: Results of experiment 1.Tapping was most stable for the visual bouncing ball sequence. The mean synchronization stabilities are indicated by the large gray marks. The data from individual subjects are indicated by the small marks of different colors, which indicate different subjects. AT, VF and VB represent the auditory tone sequence, visual flashing ball sequence, and visual bouncing ball sequence, respectively.

Mentions: The stability of beat synchronization was assessed using a circular analysis method1113. The difference between the time of a tap and the time of the corresponding event onset was measured by the relative phase (RP) on a unit circle. Synchronization stability was indexed by R, which was the length of the resultant of the RPs11. R ranged from 0 (randomly unstable tapping) to 1 (perfectly stable tapping) (see the Methods below for details). A two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the factors sequence type (three sequence types) and IOI type (two IOI types) showed a significant main effect for sequence type (F2,28 = 11.283, p = 0.001, partial η2 = 0.545) (Fig. 2). There was no significant main effect for IOI type and no significant interaction between the two factors. The comparisons between sequence types for individual IOIs in experiments 1 and 2 are listed in Table 1. The mean and SD of the stability (R) for all sequence types and all IOI types in all experiments are listed in Table S1. For both IOIs, tapping was more stable for the auditory tone sequence than for the visual flashing ball sequence, replicating the well-known auditory advantage of beat synchronization. However, tapping to the visual bouncing ball sequence was also more stable than tapping to the visual flashing ball sequence, and was not less stable than tapping to the auditory tone sequence (Table 1). Therefore, the auditory advantage disappeared when the realistically moving visual stimuli were adopted.


Synchronization to a bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory.

Gan L, Huang Y, Zhou L, Qian C, Wu X - Sci Rep (2015)

Results of experiment 1.Tapping was most stable for the visual bouncing ball sequence. The mean synchronization stabilities are indicated by the large gray marks. The data from individual subjects are indicated by the small marks of different colors, which indicate different subjects. AT, VF and VB represent the auditory tone sequence, visual flashing ball sequence, and visual bouncing ball sequence, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493690&req=5

f2: Results of experiment 1.Tapping was most stable for the visual bouncing ball sequence. The mean synchronization stabilities are indicated by the large gray marks. The data from individual subjects are indicated by the small marks of different colors, which indicate different subjects. AT, VF and VB represent the auditory tone sequence, visual flashing ball sequence, and visual bouncing ball sequence, respectively.
Mentions: The stability of beat synchronization was assessed using a circular analysis method1113. The difference between the time of a tap and the time of the corresponding event onset was measured by the relative phase (RP) on a unit circle. Synchronization stability was indexed by R, which was the length of the resultant of the RPs11. R ranged from 0 (randomly unstable tapping) to 1 (perfectly stable tapping) (see the Methods below for details). A two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the factors sequence type (three sequence types) and IOI type (two IOI types) showed a significant main effect for sequence type (F2,28 = 11.283, p = 0.001, partial η2 = 0.545) (Fig. 2). There was no significant main effect for IOI type and no significant interaction between the two factors. The comparisons between sequence types for individual IOIs in experiments 1 and 2 are listed in Table 1. The mean and SD of the stability (R) for all sequence types and all IOI types in all experiments are listed in Table S1. For both IOIs, tapping was more stable for the auditory tone sequence than for the visual flashing ball sequence, replicating the well-known auditory advantage of beat synchronization. However, tapping to the visual bouncing ball sequence was also more stable than tapping to the visual flashing ball sequence, and was not less stable than tapping to the auditory tone sequence (Table 1). Therefore, the auditory advantage disappeared when the realistically moving visual stimuli were adopted.

Bottom Line: Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat.This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific.Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Building 313, 135 Xingang west road, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 510275.

ABSTRACT
Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat. It has been established for over a century that beat synchronization is less stable for the visual than for the auditory modality. This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific. Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome. This finding challenges the auditory advantage of beat synchronization, and has important implications for the understanding of the biological substrates of beat synchronization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus