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Synchronization to a bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory.

Gan L, Huang Y, Zhou L, Qian C, Wu X - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat.This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific.Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Building 313, 135 Xingang west road, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 510275.

ABSTRACT
Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat. It has been established for over a century that beat synchronization is less stable for the visual than for the auditory modality. This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific. Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome. This finding challenges the auditory advantage of beat synchronization, and has important implications for the understanding of the biological substrates of beat synchronization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustration of the experimental stimuli.The subjects tapped along with an auditory tone sequence (A), a visual flashing ball sequence (B), or a visual bouncing ball sequence (C). Three cycles of the 600 ms IOI sequences from experiment 1 are shown. The velocity and trajectory of the visual bouncing ball are indicated in the inset of C. (The drawings in all Figures were drawn by the authors).
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f1: Illustration of the experimental stimuli.The subjects tapped along with an auditory tone sequence (A), a visual flashing ball sequence (B), or a visual bouncing ball sequence (C). Three cycles of the 600 ms IOI sequences from experiment 1 are shown. The velocity and trajectory of the visual bouncing ball are indicated in the inset of C. (The drawings in all Figures were drawn by the authors).

Mentions: In experiment 1, beat synchronization was studied by having the subjects tap a finger along with a metronome68, which was composed of an isochronous sequence with a 600 or 900 ms IOI. There were three types of sequences (Fig. 1): the auditory tone sequence, the visual flashing ball sequence, and the visual bouncing ball sequence. The velocity of the bouncing ball was varied by simulating the effect of gravity, i.e., with a uniformly varying velocity. The acceleration of the earth’s gravity is 9.8 m/s2, and the movement distance of a corresponding falling object would be substantially greater than the height of a computer monitor for the typical beat intervals (300 to 900 ms). Therefore, the acceleration was 0.20 m/s2 for the 600 ms IOI bouncing ball sequence and was 0.09 m/s2 for the 900 ms IOI bouncing ball sequence (the stimuli could be viewed as representing falling objects on other possible planets with different gravitational accelerations than the earth). The assignment of the acceleration was also related to the correction of movement discontinuities. Because of the ball’s high speed at the lowest positions (see the inset of Fig. 1C), a clear movement discontinuity was observed in the preliminary testing in which the visual bouncing ball sequence was presented on a typical computer monitor using a movement-distance/ball-size ratio that was slightly larger than 1 (thus the last several steps down or first several steps up were too large). Therefore, to obtain a smooth movement, particularly at the lowest positions, a computer monitor with both a high refresh rate and a high resolution was used, and a smaller movement-distance/ball-size ratio was adopted. (See the Methods below for detailed movement parameters).


Synchronization to a bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory.

Gan L, Huang Y, Zhou L, Qian C, Wu X - Sci Rep (2015)

Illustration of the experimental stimuli.The subjects tapped along with an auditory tone sequence (A), a visual flashing ball sequence (B), or a visual bouncing ball sequence (C). Three cycles of the 600 ms IOI sequences from experiment 1 are shown. The velocity and trajectory of the visual bouncing ball are indicated in the inset of C. (The drawings in all Figures were drawn by the authors).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493690&req=5

f1: Illustration of the experimental stimuli.The subjects tapped along with an auditory tone sequence (A), a visual flashing ball sequence (B), or a visual bouncing ball sequence (C). Three cycles of the 600 ms IOI sequences from experiment 1 are shown. The velocity and trajectory of the visual bouncing ball are indicated in the inset of C. (The drawings in all Figures were drawn by the authors).
Mentions: In experiment 1, beat synchronization was studied by having the subjects tap a finger along with a metronome68, which was composed of an isochronous sequence with a 600 or 900 ms IOI. There were three types of sequences (Fig. 1): the auditory tone sequence, the visual flashing ball sequence, and the visual bouncing ball sequence. The velocity of the bouncing ball was varied by simulating the effect of gravity, i.e., with a uniformly varying velocity. The acceleration of the earth’s gravity is 9.8 m/s2, and the movement distance of a corresponding falling object would be substantially greater than the height of a computer monitor for the typical beat intervals (300 to 900 ms). Therefore, the acceleration was 0.20 m/s2 for the 600 ms IOI bouncing ball sequence and was 0.09 m/s2 for the 900 ms IOI bouncing ball sequence (the stimuli could be viewed as representing falling objects on other possible planets with different gravitational accelerations than the earth). The assignment of the acceleration was also related to the correction of movement discontinuities. Because of the ball’s high speed at the lowest positions (see the inset of Fig. 1C), a clear movement discontinuity was observed in the preliminary testing in which the visual bouncing ball sequence was presented on a typical computer monitor using a movement-distance/ball-size ratio that was slightly larger than 1 (thus the last several steps down or first several steps up were too large). Therefore, to obtain a smooth movement, particularly at the lowest positions, a computer monitor with both a high refresh rate and a high resolution was used, and a smaller movement-distance/ball-size ratio was adopted. (See the Methods below for detailed movement parameters).

Bottom Line: Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat.This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific.Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Building 313, 135 Xingang west road, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 510275.

ABSTRACT
Daily music experience involves synchronizing movements in time with a perceived periodic beat. It has been established for over a century that beat synchronization is less stable for the visual than for the auditory modality. This auditory advantage of beat synchronization gives rise to the hypotheses that the neural and evolutionary mechanisms underlying beat synchronization are modality-specific. Here, however, we found that synchronization to a periodically bouncing ball with a realistic motion trajectory was not less stable than synchronization to an auditory metronome. This finding challenges the auditory advantage of beat synchronization, and has important implications for the understanding of the biological substrates of beat synchronization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus