Limits...
Population structure among octocoral adults and recruits identifies scale dependent patterns of population isolation in The Bahamas.

Lasker HR, Porto-Hannes I - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: Analysis of recruits from 4 sites on the LBB from up to 6 years did not detect differences between years nor differences with adult populations.The result suggests that neither selection on recruits nor inter-annual variation in dispersal affected adult population structure.Recognition of these complex patterns is important in developing management plans for A. elisabethae and in understanding the effects of disturbance to adult populations of A. elisabethae and similar species with limited dispersal.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geology, University at Buffalo , Buffalo, NY , USA ; Graduate Program in Evolution, Ecology and Behavior, University at Buffalo , Buffalo, NY , USA.

ABSTRACT
Patterns of dispersal and connectivity of the Caribbean gorgonian Antillogorgia elisabethae in The Bahamas were assessed in both adults and recently settled recruits from 13 sites using microsatellite loci. Adult populations along the Little Bahama Bank (LBB) exhibited a clear pattern of isolation by distance (IBD) which described 86% of the variance in pairwise genetic distances. Estimates of dispersal based on the IBD model suggested dispersal distances along the LBB on the order of 100 m. Increasing the spatial scale to include sites separated by open ocean generated an apparent IBD signal but the relationship had a greater slope and explained less of the variance. This relationship with distance reflected both stepping stone based IBD and regional differentiation probably created by ocean currents and barriers to dispersal that are correlated with geographic distance. Analysis of recruits from 4 sites on the LBB from up to 6 years did not detect differences between years nor differences with adult populations. The result suggests that neither selection on recruits nor inter-annual variation in dispersal affected adult population structure. Assignment tests of recruits indicated the most likely sources of the recruits were the local or adjacent populations. Most of the patterning in population structure in the northern Bahamas can be explained by geographic distance and oceanographic connectivity. Recognition of these complex patterns is important in developing management plans for A. elisabethae and in understanding the effects of disturbance to adult populations of A. elisabethae and similar species with limited dispersal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of sample sites.Map of the northern Bahamas showing the location of the sample locations. Dashed lines denote the Little and Great Bahama Banks. Map source: World_Light_Gray_Base from Esri, HERE, DeLorme, MapmyIndia, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS user community. Map created in ArcGIS v. 10.1.
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fig-1: Location of sample sites.Map of the northern Bahamas showing the location of the sample locations. Dashed lines denote the Little and Great Bahama Banks. Map source: World_Light_Gray_Base from Esri, HERE, DeLorme, MapmyIndia, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS user community. Map created in ArcGIS v. 10.1.

Mentions: In order to assess genetic diversity and structure of Antillogorgia elisabethae tissue samples from adult colonies were collected from 13 sites in the northern Bahamas (Table 1 and Fig. 1). Colony samples were collected from arbitrarily chosen colonies at each site. There have not been any observations of reproduction via fragmentation in detailed surveys for recruits at multiple sites in The Bahamas (Lasker, 2013). Colonies were collected at several meter or greater intervals in order to minimize the likelihood of sampling familial groups. Collections at some sites required searching along paths of 200–400 m. Depth at the different sites ranged from 8 to 22 m. From each colony, ca. 4 cm of live tissue was removed and preserved in 95% ethanol. Many of the sites were similar to those reported in Gutiérrez-Rodríguez & Lasker (2004c), but only two, (San Salvador and Hog Cay) were identical sites and samples.


Population structure among octocoral adults and recruits identifies scale dependent patterns of population isolation in The Bahamas.

Lasker HR, Porto-Hannes I - PeerJ (2015)

Location of sample sites.Map of the northern Bahamas showing the location of the sample locations. Dashed lines denote the Little and Great Bahama Banks. Map source: World_Light_Gray_Base from Esri, HERE, DeLorme, MapmyIndia, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS user community. Map created in ArcGIS v. 10.1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493681&req=5

fig-1: Location of sample sites.Map of the northern Bahamas showing the location of the sample locations. Dashed lines denote the Little and Great Bahama Banks. Map source: World_Light_Gray_Base from Esri, HERE, DeLorme, MapmyIndia, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS user community. Map created in ArcGIS v. 10.1.
Mentions: In order to assess genetic diversity and structure of Antillogorgia elisabethae tissue samples from adult colonies were collected from 13 sites in the northern Bahamas (Table 1 and Fig. 1). Colony samples were collected from arbitrarily chosen colonies at each site. There have not been any observations of reproduction via fragmentation in detailed surveys for recruits at multiple sites in The Bahamas (Lasker, 2013). Colonies were collected at several meter or greater intervals in order to minimize the likelihood of sampling familial groups. Collections at some sites required searching along paths of 200–400 m. Depth at the different sites ranged from 8 to 22 m. From each colony, ca. 4 cm of live tissue was removed and preserved in 95% ethanol. Many of the sites were similar to those reported in Gutiérrez-Rodríguez & Lasker (2004c), but only two, (San Salvador and Hog Cay) were identical sites and samples.

Bottom Line: Analysis of recruits from 4 sites on the LBB from up to 6 years did not detect differences between years nor differences with adult populations.The result suggests that neither selection on recruits nor inter-annual variation in dispersal affected adult population structure.Recognition of these complex patterns is important in developing management plans for A. elisabethae and in understanding the effects of disturbance to adult populations of A. elisabethae and similar species with limited dispersal.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geology, University at Buffalo , Buffalo, NY , USA ; Graduate Program in Evolution, Ecology and Behavior, University at Buffalo , Buffalo, NY , USA.

ABSTRACT
Patterns of dispersal and connectivity of the Caribbean gorgonian Antillogorgia elisabethae in The Bahamas were assessed in both adults and recently settled recruits from 13 sites using microsatellite loci. Adult populations along the Little Bahama Bank (LBB) exhibited a clear pattern of isolation by distance (IBD) which described 86% of the variance in pairwise genetic distances. Estimates of dispersal based on the IBD model suggested dispersal distances along the LBB on the order of 100 m. Increasing the spatial scale to include sites separated by open ocean generated an apparent IBD signal but the relationship had a greater slope and explained less of the variance. This relationship with distance reflected both stepping stone based IBD and regional differentiation probably created by ocean currents and barriers to dispersal that are correlated with geographic distance. Analysis of recruits from 4 sites on the LBB from up to 6 years did not detect differences between years nor differences with adult populations. The result suggests that neither selection on recruits nor inter-annual variation in dispersal affected adult population structure. Assignment tests of recruits indicated the most likely sources of the recruits were the local or adjacent populations. Most of the patterning in population structure in the northern Bahamas can be explained by geographic distance and oceanographic connectivity. Recognition of these complex patterns is important in developing management plans for A. elisabethae and in understanding the effects of disturbance to adult populations of A. elisabethae and similar species with limited dispersal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus