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Comparing cestode infections and their consequences for host fitness in two sexual branchiopods: alien Artemia franciscana and native A. salina from syntopic-populations.

Redón S, Amat F, Sánchez MI, Green AJ - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: Both these effects were significantly stronger in the native host than in A. franciscana with the same parasite loads.However, for the first time, significant castration effects (for E. avoceti and F. liguloides) and colour change (for six cestode species) were observed in infected A. franciscana.At the same time, they are likely to reduce the production of A. franciscana cysts in areas where they are harvested commercially.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Acuicultura de Torre de la Sal (IATS-CSIC), Ribera de Cabanes s/n , Castellón , Spain.

ABSTRACT
The American brine shrimp Artemia franciscana is invasive in the Mediterranean region where it has displaced native species (the sexual A. salina, and the clonal A. parthenogenetica) from many salt pond complexes. Artemia populations are parasitized by numerous avian cestodes whose effects have been studied in native species. We present a study from the Ebro Delta salterns (NE Spain), in a salt pond where both A. franciscana and native A. salina populations coexist, providing a unique opportunity to compare the parasite loads of the two sexual species in syntopy. The native species had consistently higher infection parameters, largely because the dominant cestode in A. salina adults and juveniles (Flamingolepis liguloides) was much rarer in A. franciscana. The most abundant cestodes in the alien species were Eurycestus avoceti (in adults) and Flamingolepis flamingo (in juveniles). The abundance of E. avoceti and F. liguloides was higher in the A. franciscana population syntopic with A. salina than in a population sampled at the same time in another pond where the native brine shrimp was absent, possibly because the native shrimp provides a better reservoir for parasite circulation. Infection by cestodes caused red colouration in adult and juvenile A. salina, and also led to castration in a high proportion of adult females. Both these effects were significantly stronger in the native host than in A. franciscana with the same parasite loads. However, for the first time, significant castration effects (for E. avoceti and F. liguloides) and colour change (for six cestode species) were observed in infected A. franciscana. Avian cestodes are likely to help A. franciscana outcompete native species. At the same time, they are likely to reduce the production of A. franciscana cysts in areas where they are harvested commercially.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Seasonal variation of temperature and proportion of native A. salina in the brine shrimp community from pond CX throughout an annual cycle.The right vertical axis indicates the proportion of all Artemia present (whether adults or juveniles) that were A. salina. A. franciscana were present in all months.
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fig-2: Seasonal variation of temperature and proportion of native A. salina in the brine shrimp community from pond CX throughout an annual cycle.The right vertical axis indicates the proportion of all Artemia present (whether adults or juveniles) that were A. salina. A. franciscana were present in all months.

Mentions: In pond CX where both Artemia species coexisted, A. salina was detected only in colder months, from January to May 2009, and September 2009 to January 2010 (Fig. 2), whereas A. franciscana was present all year long. Nine cestode species were detected in A. franciscana, and seven of these in A. salina (Table 1). These included four species whose adults are parasitic in flamingos (Flamingolepis liguloides, F. flamingo, Gynandrotaenia stammeri and Gynandrotaenia sp.), three in shorebirds (Anomotaenia tringae, A. microphallos and Eurycestus avoceti), one in gulls (Wardium stellorae) and one in shelducks (Fimbriarioides tadornae).


Comparing cestode infections and their consequences for host fitness in two sexual branchiopods: alien Artemia franciscana and native A. salina from syntopic-populations.

Redón S, Amat F, Sánchez MI, Green AJ - PeerJ (2015)

Seasonal variation of temperature and proportion of native A. salina in the brine shrimp community from pond CX throughout an annual cycle.The right vertical axis indicates the proportion of all Artemia present (whether adults or juveniles) that were A. salina. A. franciscana were present in all months.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493677&req=5

fig-2: Seasonal variation of temperature and proportion of native A. salina in the brine shrimp community from pond CX throughout an annual cycle.The right vertical axis indicates the proportion of all Artemia present (whether adults or juveniles) that were A. salina. A. franciscana were present in all months.
Mentions: In pond CX where both Artemia species coexisted, A. salina was detected only in colder months, from January to May 2009, and September 2009 to January 2010 (Fig. 2), whereas A. franciscana was present all year long. Nine cestode species were detected in A. franciscana, and seven of these in A. salina (Table 1). These included four species whose adults are parasitic in flamingos (Flamingolepis liguloides, F. flamingo, Gynandrotaenia stammeri and Gynandrotaenia sp.), three in shorebirds (Anomotaenia tringae, A. microphallos and Eurycestus avoceti), one in gulls (Wardium stellorae) and one in shelducks (Fimbriarioides tadornae).

Bottom Line: Both these effects were significantly stronger in the native host than in A. franciscana with the same parasite loads.However, for the first time, significant castration effects (for E. avoceti and F. liguloides) and colour change (for six cestode species) were observed in infected A. franciscana.At the same time, they are likely to reduce the production of A. franciscana cysts in areas where they are harvested commercially.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Acuicultura de Torre de la Sal (IATS-CSIC), Ribera de Cabanes s/n , Castellón , Spain.

ABSTRACT
The American brine shrimp Artemia franciscana is invasive in the Mediterranean region where it has displaced native species (the sexual A. salina, and the clonal A. parthenogenetica) from many salt pond complexes. Artemia populations are parasitized by numerous avian cestodes whose effects have been studied in native species. We present a study from the Ebro Delta salterns (NE Spain), in a salt pond where both A. franciscana and native A. salina populations coexist, providing a unique opportunity to compare the parasite loads of the two sexual species in syntopy. The native species had consistently higher infection parameters, largely because the dominant cestode in A. salina adults and juveniles (Flamingolepis liguloides) was much rarer in A. franciscana. The most abundant cestodes in the alien species were Eurycestus avoceti (in adults) and Flamingolepis flamingo (in juveniles). The abundance of E. avoceti and F. liguloides was higher in the A. franciscana population syntopic with A. salina than in a population sampled at the same time in another pond where the native brine shrimp was absent, possibly because the native shrimp provides a better reservoir for parasite circulation. Infection by cestodes caused red colouration in adult and juvenile A. salina, and also led to castration in a high proportion of adult females. Both these effects were significantly stronger in the native host than in A. franciscana with the same parasite loads. However, for the first time, significant castration effects (for E. avoceti and F. liguloides) and colour change (for six cestode species) were observed in infected A. franciscana. Avian cestodes are likely to help A. franciscana outcompete native species. At the same time, they are likely to reduce the production of A. franciscana cysts in areas where they are harvested commercially.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus