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Imaging neuroinflammation? A perspective from MR spectroscopy.

Zahr NM, Mayer D, Rohlfing T, Sullivan EV, Pfefferbaum A - Brain Pathol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Significant four-group comparisons were evident only for striatal choline-containing compounds (Cho) and myo-inositol (mI), which follow-up analysis demonstrated were due to higher levels in HA compared with C individuals.Higher levels of mI were related to greater lifetime alcohol consumed, whereas HAART was associated with lower mI levels.The current results suggest that competing mechanisms can influence in vivo Cho and mI levels, and that elevations in these metabolites cannot necessarily be interpreted as reflecting a single underlying mechanism, including neuroinflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine (MC5723), Stanford, CA; Neuroscience Program, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Four-group comparisons of Cho and mI levels in the striatum, cerebellum and pons. A = alcoholic; AIDS = acquired immune deficiency syndrome; a.u. = arbitrary units; C = control; Cho = choline-containing compounds; H = human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive; HA = HIV positive + alcoholic individuals; HCV = hepatitis C; mI = myo-inositol.
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fig02: Four-group comparisons of Cho and mI levels in the striatum, cerebellum and pons. A = alcoholic; AIDS = acquired immune deficiency syndrome; a.u. = arbitrary units; C = control; Cho = choline-containing compounds; H = human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive; HA = HIV positive + alcoholic individuals; HCV = hepatitis C; mI = myo-inositol.

Mentions: ANOVAs were used to determine group differences in the levels of five metabolites (NAA, tCr, Cho, Glu, mI) in three regions (striatum, cerebellum and pons). The only significant four-group ANOVAs were for Cho [F(162) = 2.92, P = 0.0360] and mI [F(162) = 4.19, P = 0.0069] in the striatum (Figure 2). Follow-up t-tests showed that group differences in striatal Cho (P = 0.0044) and mI (P = 0.0007) levels were due to higher levels in HA compared with the C group.


Imaging neuroinflammation? A perspective from MR spectroscopy.

Zahr NM, Mayer D, Rohlfing T, Sullivan EV, Pfefferbaum A - Brain Pathol. (2014)

Four-group comparisons of Cho and mI levels in the striatum, cerebellum and pons. A = alcoholic; AIDS = acquired immune deficiency syndrome; a.u. = arbitrary units; C = control; Cho = choline-containing compounds; H = human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive; HA = HIV positive + alcoholic individuals; HCV = hepatitis C; mI = myo-inositol.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493672&req=5

fig02: Four-group comparisons of Cho and mI levels in the striatum, cerebellum and pons. A = alcoholic; AIDS = acquired immune deficiency syndrome; a.u. = arbitrary units; C = control; Cho = choline-containing compounds; H = human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive; HA = HIV positive + alcoholic individuals; HCV = hepatitis C; mI = myo-inositol.
Mentions: ANOVAs were used to determine group differences in the levels of five metabolites (NAA, tCr, Cho, Glu, mI) in three regions (striatum, cerebellum and pons). The only significant four-group ANOVAs were for Cho [F(162) = 2.92, P = 0.0360] and mI [F(162) = 4.19, P = 0.0069] in the striatum (Figure 2). Follow-up t-tests showed that group differences in striatal Cho (P = 0.0044) and mI (P = 0.0007) levels were due to higher levels in HA compared with the C group.

Bottom Line: Significant four-group comparisons were evident only for striatal choline-containing compounds (Cho) and myo-inositol (mI), which follow-up analysis demonstrated were due to higher levels in HA compared with C individuals.Higher levels of mI were related to greater lifetime alcohol consumed, whereas HAART was associated with lower mI levels.The current results suggest that competing mechanisms can influence in vivo Cho and mI levels, and that elevations in these metabolites cannot necessarily be interpreted as reflecting a single underlying mechanism, including neuroinflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine (MC5723), Stanford, CA; Neuroscience Program, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus