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Two new species of Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Karnataka, India.

Poorani J - Biodivers Data J (2015)

Bottom Line: As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed.These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified.Horniolussororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ICAR-National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources, P.B. No. 2491, HA Farm Post, Bellary Road, Hebbal, Bangalore 560024, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: The Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of the Indian region is rich and highly speciose, with nearly 90 described species and scores of undescribed species (Poorani 2002). There is a dire need to systematically revise the genera and species of this tribe from the Indian region. Due to paucity of representative collections covering the entire region and lack of access to types, it is difficult to identify most of the Scymnini of the Indian region to species. As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed.

New information: Two economically important and unique species of Scymnini (Coccinellidae) belonging to Horniolus Weise (1900) and Scymnus (Pullus) Mulsant (1846) from the Southern Indian state of Karnataka that have remained unnamed for long are treated in this paper. These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified. Horniolussororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species.

No MeSH data available.


Male genitalia of S.latemaculatus: Penis
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Figure 1524514: Male genitalia of S.latemaculatus: Penis

Mentions: The external appearance of H.sororius sp. n. is very similar to that of Horniolusvietnamicus Miyatake. Horniolushisamatsui Miyatake also has a similar elytral pattern, but it has reddish brown head and pronotum. But the male genitalia, particularly the enlarged siphonal apex, are diagnostic and unique to this species. Horniolussororius sp. n. is also similar to two common Indian species, Scymnus (Pullus) latemaculatus Motschulsky (Fig. 5a), and Pharoscymnushorni (Weise) (Fig. 5d). The former is close to H.sororius sp. n. in general appearance, but can be distinguished by the presence of parallel, apically divergent carinae on the prosternal process and the male genitalia (Fig. 5b, c) are also diagnostic. Besides, it is one of the most common general predators of aphids in India. Pharoscymnushorni can be differentiated from H.sororius sp. n. by its distinctly more rounded body outline and other generic characters.


Two new species of Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) from Karnataka, India.

Poorani J - Biodivers Data J (2015)

Male genitalia of S.latemaculatus: Penis
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493668&req=5

Figure 1524514: Male genitalia of S.latemaculatus: Penis
Mentions: The external appearance of H.sororius sp. n. is very similar to that of Horniolusvietnamicus Miyatake. Horniolushisamatsui Miyatake also has a similar elytral pattern, but it has reddish brown head and pronotum. But the male genitalia, particularly the enlarged siphonal apex, are diagnostic and unique to this species. Horniolussororius sp. n. is also similar to two common Indian species, Scymnus (Pullus) latemaculatus Motschulsky (Fig. 5a), and Pharoscymnushorni (Weise) (Fig. 5d). The former is close to H.sororius sp. n. in general appearance, but can be distinguished by the presence of parallel, apically divergent carinae on the prosternal process and the male genitalia (Fig. 5b, c) are also diagnostic. Besides, it is one of the most common general predators of aphids in India. Pharoscymnushorni can be differentiated from H.sororius sp. n. by its distinctly more rounded body outline and other generic characters.

Bottom Line: As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed.These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified.Horniolussororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ICAR-National Bureau of Agricultural Insect Resources, P.B. No. 2491, HA Farm Post, Bellary Road, Hebbal, Bangalore 560024, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: The Scymnini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) of the Indian region is rich and highly speciose, with nearly 90 described species and scores of undescribed species (Poorani 2002). There is a dire need to systematically revise the genera and species of this tribe from the Indian region. Due to paucity of representative collections covering the entire region and lack of access to types, it is difficult to identify most of the Scymnini of the Indian region to species. As a result, many economically important species remain poorly characterized, or worse, unnamed.

New information: Two economically important and unique species of Scymnini (Coccinellidae) belonging to Horniolus Weise (1900) and Scymnus (Pullus) Mulsant (1846) from the Southern Indian state of Karnataka that have remained unnamed for long are treated in this paper. These species are externally similar to other known species and often misidentified. Horniolussororius sp. n. and Scymnus (Pullus) rajeshwariae sp. n. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) are described here and illustrated with notes on their biology and related species.

No MeSH data available.