Limits...
Species-level determination of closely related araucarian resins using FTIR spectroscopy and its implications for the provenance of New Zealand amber.

Seyfullah LJ, Sadowski EM, Schmidt AR - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: Here we focus on resins produced from today's most resinous conifer family, the Araucariaceae, which are thought to be the parent plants of some of the Southern Hemisphere's fossil resin deposits.The resin FTIR spectra are distinguishable from each other, and the three Araucaria species sampled produced similar FTIR spectra, to which Wollemia resin is most similar.Interspecific variability of the FTIR spectra is greatest in the three Agathis species tested.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geobiology, University of Göttingen , Göttingen , Germany.

ABSTRACT
Some higher plants, both angiosperms and gymnosperms, can produce resins and some of these resins can polymerize and fossilize to form ambers. Various physical and chemical techniques have been used to identify and profile different plant resins and have then been applied to fossilized resins (ambers), to try to detect their parent plant affinities and understand the process of polymerization, with varying levels of success. Here we focus on resins produced from today's most resinous conifer family, the Araucariaceae, which are thought to be the parent plants of some of the Southern Hemisphere's fossil resin deposits. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the resins of closely related Araucariaceae species were examined to test whether they could be distinguished at genus and species level and whether the results could then be used to infer the parent plant of a New Zealand amber. The resin FTIR spectra are distinguishable from each other, and the three Araucaria species sampled produced similar FTIR spectra, to which Wollemia resin is most similar. Interspecific variability of the FTIR spectra is greatest in the three Agathis species tested. The New Zealand amber sample is similar in key shared features with the resin samples, but it does differ from the extant resin samples in key distinguishing features, nonetheless it is most similar to the resin of Agathis australis in this dataset. However on comparison with previously published FTIR spectra of similar aged amber and older (Eocene) resinites both found in coals from New Zealand and fresh Agathis australis resin, our amber has some features that imply a relatively immature resin, which was not expected from an amber of the Miocene age.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Amber from the former Idaburn Coal Mine, Otago, southern New Zealand.(A) Overview of the exposure of the Oturehua Seam in the Fiddlers Member, Dunstan Formation, from which the amber was collected. (B) In situ amber piece at the exposure of the lignite (Oturehua Seam). (C) Washed amber sample (shown in B) from the same site. Scale is 5 cm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493646&req=5

fig-2: Amber from the former Idaburn Coal Mine, Otago, southern New Zealand.(A) Overview of the exposure of the Oturehua Seam in the Fiddlers Member, Dunstan Formation, from which the amber was collected. (B) In situ amber piece at the exposure of the lignite (Oturehua Seam). (C) Washed amber sample (shown in B) from the same site. Scale is 5 cm.

Mentions: The amber sample was collected from the disused Idaburn Coal Mine (Fig. 2A), near Oturehua, Central Otago, New Zealand. The GPS coordinates of the site are 44°58′58.63″S 169°58′52.65″E. The sample (Figs. 2B–2C) was taken from the 4 m thick Oturehua Seam (Fig. 3), Fiddlers Member, Dunstan Formation, Manuherikia Group (Douglas, 1986; Lee et al., 2003). The Manuherikia Group consists of fluvial lignite-bearing Dunstan Formation, and the overlying Bannockburn Formation that consists entirely of lacustrine sediments (Douglas, 1986; Lee et al., 2003).


Species-level determination of closely related araucarian resins using FTIR spectroscopy and its implications for the provenance of New Zealand amber.

Seyfullah LJ, Sadowski EM, Schmidt AR - PeerJ (2015)

Amber from the former Idaburn Coal Mine, Otago, southern New Zealand.(A) Overview of the exposure of the Oturehua Seam in the Fiddlers Member, Dunstan Formation, from which the amber was collected. (B) In situ amber piece at the exposure of the lignite (Oturehua Seam). (C) Washed amber sample (shown in B) from the same site. Scale is 5 cm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493646&req=5

fig-2: Amber from the former Idaburn Coal Mine, Otago, southern New Zealand.(A) Overview of the exposure of the Oturehua Seam in the Fiddlers Member, Dunstan Formation, from which the amber was collected. (B) In situ amber piece at the exposure of the lignite (Oturehua Seam). (C) Washed amber sample (shown in B) from the same site. Scale is 5 cm.
Mentions: The amber sample was collected from the disused Idaburn Coal Mine (Fig. 2A), near Oturehua, Central Otago, New Zealand. The GPS coordinates of the site are 44°58′58.63″S 169°58′52.65″E. The sample (Figs. 2B–2C) was taken from the 4 m thick Oturehua Seam (Fig. 3), Fiddlers Member, Dunstan Formation, Manuherikia Group (Douglas, 1986; Lee et al., 2003). The Manuherikia Group consists of fluvial lignite-bearing Dunstan Formation, and the overlying Bannockburn Formation that consists entirely of lacustrine sediments (Douglas, 1986; Lee et al., 2003).

Bottom Line: Here we focus on resins produced from today's most resinous conifer family, the Araucariaceae, which are thought to be the parent plants of some of the Southern Hemisphere's fossil resin deposits.The resin FTIR spectra are distinguishable from each other, and the three Araucaria species sampled produced similar FTIR spectra, to which Wollemia resin is most similar.Interspecific variability of the FTIR spectra is greatest in the three Agathis species tested.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geobiology, University of Göttingen , Göttingen , Germany.

ABSTRACT
Some higher plants, both angiosperms and gymnosperms, can produce resins and some of these resins can polymerize and fossilize to form ambers. Various physical and chemical techniques have been used to identify and profile different plant resins and have then been applied to fossilized resins (ambers), to try to detect their parent plant affinities and understand the process of polymerization, with varying levels of success. Here we focus on resins produced from today's most resinous conifer family, the Araucariaceae, which are thought to be the parent plants of some of the Southern Hemisphere's fossil resin deposits. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the resins of closely related Araucariaceae species were examined to test whether they could be distinguished at genus and species level and whether the results could then be used to infer the parent plant of a New Zealand amber. The resin FTIR spectra are distinguishable from each other, and the three Araucaria species sampled produced similar FTIR spectra, to which Wollemia resin is most similar. Interspecific variability of the FTIR spectra is greatest in the three Agathis species tested. The New Zealand amber sample is similar in key shared features with the resin samples, but it does differ from the extant resin samples in key distinguishing features, nonetheless it is most similar to the resin of Agathis australis in this dataset. However on comparison with previously published FTIR spectra of similar aged amber and older (Eocene) resinites both found in coals from New Zealand and fresh Agathis australis resin, our amber has some features that imply a relatively immature resin, which was not expected from an amber of the Miocene age.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus