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Mice that gorged during dietary restriction increased foraging related behaviors and differed in their macronutrient preference when released from restriction.

Hambly C, Speakman JR - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: Gorgers lost significantly more BM than non-gorgers possibly due to an increased physical activity linked to anticipation of daily food provision.Gorgers and non-gorgers had a significantly greater high carbohydrate diet intake than controls, and gorgers also had a significantly greater high protein diet intake than non-gorgers and controls.On unrestricted food, they did not continue to gorge, although they still had a significantly greater 2-h FI than the other groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen , Aberdeen , UK.

ABSTRACT
Caloric restriction (CR) can trigger gorging behavior. We examined macronutrient choice and behavior in mice that gorged during restriction compared to restricted non-gorgers and controls. Fifty MF1 male mice were restricted to 75% of ad-libitum food intake (FI), while ten controls were fed ad-lib. Body mass (BM) and FI were measured two and 24-h after food inclusion over 14-days. 'Gorging' mice were defined as those which ate over 25% of their daily FI in 2-h. The top 11 gorgers and the lowest 9 gorgers, along with 10 controls, had their behavior analysed during restriction, and were then provided with an unrestricted food choice, consisting of three diets that were high in fat, protein or carbohydrate. During restriction gorgers ate on average 51% of their daily FI in the 2-h following food introduction while the non-gorgers ate only 16%. Gorgers lost significantly more BM than non-gorgers possibly due to an increased physical activity linked to anticipation of daily food provision. Controls and non-gorgers spent most of their time sleeping. After restriction, both gorgers and non-gorgers were hyperphagic until their lost weight was regained. All 3 groups favoured high fat food. Gorgers and non-gorgers had a significantly greater high carbohydrate diet intake than controls, and gorgers also had a significantly greater high protein diet intake than non-gorgers and controls. On unrestricted food, they did not continue to gorge, although they still had a significantly greater 2-h FI than the other groups. Elevated protein intake may play an important role in the recovery of the lost lean tissue of gorgers after restriction.

No MeSH data available.


Mean daily intake of the three nutrients, high carbohydrate diet (HCD), high protein diet (HPD) and high fat diet (HFD) by the three groups of mice during days (A) 1–3 and (B) 10–14 of diet choice.Standard error bars are shown. Bars with common letters show no significant difference between the groups for each diet category.
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fig-5: Mean daily intake of the three nutrients, high carbohydrate diet (HCD), high protein diet (HPD) and high fat diet (HFD) by the three groups of mice during days (A) 1–3 and (B) 10–14 of diet choice.Standard error bars are shown. Bars with common letters show no significant difference between the groups for each diet category.

Mentions: The different amounts of each diet consumed (high protein, high fat or high carbohydrate) over either the first 1–3 days or the last 5 days of diet choice were compared. In all groups, the high fat diet was preferred above the high carbohydrate diet and least preferred was the high protein diet (Fig. 5). Both groups of animals that had been on food restriction had a significantly greater intake of high carbohydrate diet than controls over the first 3 days (ANOVA F2,27 = 5.19, P = 0.012; Fig. 5A). In addition, the gorgers also had a significantly greater intake of high protein diet than both non-gorgers and controls (ANOVA F2,27 = 3.70, P = 0.038). High fat diet consumption didn’t differ between the groups. The amount of energy consumed for each of the three macronutrients across all 3 diets was calculated (Table 2). The restricted mice did consume more carbohydrate when combining all 3 diets than the controls while only the gorging mice increased their intake of protein. By the end of the diet choice period, the intakes of each diet had normalised to the levels of the controls (Fig. 5B).


Mice that gorged during dietary restriction increased foraging related behaviors and differed in their macronutrient preference when released from restriction.

Hambly C, Speakman JR - PeerJ (2015)

Mean daily intake of the three nutrients, high carbohydrate diet (HCD), high protein diet (HPD) and high fat diet (HFD) by the three groups of mice during days (A) 1–3 and (B) 10–14 of diet choice.Standard error bars are shown. Bars with common letters show no significant difference between the groups for each diet category.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493644&req=5

fig-5: Mean daily intake of the three nutrients, high carbohydrate diet (HCD), high protein diet (HPD) and high fat diet (HFD) by the three groups of mice during days (A) 1–3 and (B) 10–14 of diet choice.Standard error bars are shown. Bars with common letters show no significant difference between the groups for each diet category.
Mentions: The different amounts of each diet consumed (high protein, high fat or high carbohydrate) over either the first 1–3 days or the last 5 days of diet choice were compared. In all groups, the high fat diet was preferred above the high carbohydrate diet and least preferred was the high protein diet (Fig. 5). Both groups of animals that had been on food restriction had a significantly greater intake of high carbohydrate diet than controls over the first 3 days (ANOVA F2,27 = 5.19, P = 0.012; Fig. 5A). In addition, the gorgers also had a significantly greater intake of high protein diet than both non-gorgers and controls (ANOVA F2,27 = 3.70, P = 0.038). High fat diet consumption didn’t differ between the groups. The amount of energy consumed for each of the three macronutrients across all 3 diets was calculated (Table 2). The restricted mice did consume more carbohydrate when combining all 3 diets than the controls while only the gorging mice increased their intake of protein. By the end of the diet choice period, the intakes of each diet had normalised to the levels of the controls (Fig. 5B).

Bottom Line: Gorgers lost significantly more BM than non-gorgers possibly due to an increased physical activity linked to anticipation of daily food provision.Gorgers and non-gorgers had a significantly greater high carbohydrate diet intake than controls, and gorgers also had a significantly greater high protein diet intake than non-gorgers and controls.On unrestricted food, they did not continue to gorge, although they still had a significantly greater 2-h FI than the other groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen , Aberdeen , UK.

ABSTRACT
Caloric restriction (CR) can trigger gorging behavior. We examined macronutrient choice and behavior in mice that gorged during restriction compared to restricted non-gorgers and controls. Fifty MF1 male mice were restricted to 75% of ad-libitum food intake (FI), while ten controls were fed ad-lib. Body mass (BM) and FI were measured two and 24-h after food inclusion over 14-days. 'Gorging' mice were defined as those which ate over 25% of their daily FI in 2-h. The top 11 gorgers and the lowest 9 gorgers, along with 10 controls, had their behavior analysed during restriction, and were then provided with an unrestricted food choice, consisting of three diets that were high in fat, protein or carbohydrate. During restriction gorgers ate on average 51% of their daily FI in the 2-h following food introduction while the non-gorgers ate only 16%. Gorgers lost significantly more BM than non-gorgers possibly due to an increased physical activity linked to anticipation of daily food provision. Controls and non-gorgers spent most of their time sleeping. After restriction, both gorgers and non-gorgers were hyperphagic until their lost weight was regained. All 3 groups favoured high fat food. Gorgers and non-gorgers had a significantly greater high carbohydrate diet intake than controls, and gorgers also had a significantly greater high protein diet intake than non-gorgers and controls. On unrestricted food, they did not continue to gorge, although they still had a significantly greater 2-h FI than the other groups. Elevated protein intake may play an important role in the recovery of the lost lean tissue of gorgers after restriction.

No MeSH data available.