Limits...
Who started first? Bird species visiting novel birdfeeders.

Tryjanowski P, Morelli F, Skórka P, Goławski A, Indykiewicz P, Pape Møller A, Mitrus C, Wysocki D, Zduniak P - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Use of novel food sources was faster in urban habitats and the presence of other feeders reduced the time until a new feeder was located.Urbanization may be associated with behavioural skills, technical innovations and neophilia resulting in faster discovery of new food sources.This process is accelerated by the experience of feeder use in the vicinity, with a strong modifying effect of the number of domestic cats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Zoology, Poznań University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 71C, PL-60-625 Poznań, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Adapting to exploit new food sources may be essential, particularly in winter, when the impact of food limitation on survival of individuals is critical. One of the most important additional sources of food for birds in human settlements is birdfeeders. At a large spatial scale, we experimentally provided birdfeeders with four different kinds of food to analyze exploitation and use of a novel food supply provided by humans. Nine species started foraging at the new birdfeeders. The species that exploited the new feeders the fastest was the great tit. Use of novel food sources was faster in urban habitats and the presence of other feeders reduced the time until a new feeder was located. Urbanization may be associated with behavioural skills, technical innovations and neophilia resulting in faster discovery of new food sources. This process is accelerated by the experience of feeder use in the vicinity, with a strong modifying effect of the number of domestic cats.

No MeSH data available.


Abundance and frequency of first birds visiting a novel food source for different bird species.Sample sizes were 89 and 467 individuals, respectively, for the first bird and for the entire wintering bird community.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493560&req=5

f1: Abundance and frequency of first birds visiting a novel food source for different bird species.Sample sizes were 89 and 467 individuals, respectively, for the first bird and for the entire wintering bird community.

Mentions: The wintering bird community around experimental birdfeeders contained 925 individuals belonging to 43 species (6.7, SD = 2.88; range 1–13). In 89 cases (64.5% of all 138 trials), a total of nine species visited experimental birdfeeders during 120 minutes and started to forage (Fig. 1). The proportion of species that discovered new food sources differed significantly from the species composition in the wintering bird community (Fig. 1; χ2 = 53.33, df = 8, P < 0.001). The bird species most frequently using the new food source was the great tit (64.0% of all cases). There were no significant differences between the frequencies of bird species first using the new food source in rural and urban environments (χ2 = 4.21, df = 3, P = 0.24). Male great tits were the most frequent users of new feeders (80%, χ2 = 4.14, df = 1, P = 0.04), despite an even sex ratio of this species in the study area (sex ratio: 92 females, 106 males; P = 0.39).


Who started first? Bird species visiting novel birdfeeders.

Tryjanowski P, Morelli F, Skórka P, Goławski A, Indykiewicz P, Pape Møller A, Mitrus C, Wysocki D, Zduniak P - Sci Rep (2015)

Abundance and frequency of first birds visiting a novel food source for different bird species.Sample sizes were 89 and 467 individuals, respectively, for the first bird and for the entire wintering bird community.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493560&req=5

f1: Abundance and frequency of first birds visiting a novel food source for different bird species.Sample sizes were 89 and 467 individuals, respectively, for the first bird and for the entire wintering bird community.
Mentions: The wintering bird community around experimental birdfeeders contained 925 individuals belonging to 43 species (6.7, SD = 2.88; range 1–13). In 89 cases (64.5% of all 138 trials), a total of nine species visited experimental birdfeeders during 120 minutes and started to forage (Fig. 1). The proportion of species that discovered new food sources differed significantly from the species composition in the wintering bird community (Fig. 1; χ2 = 53.33, df = 8, P < 0.001). The bird species most frequently using the new food source was the great tit (64.0% of all cases). There were no significant differences between the frequencies of bird species first using the new food source in rural and urban environments (χ2 = 4.21, df = 3, P = 0.24). Male great tits were the most frequent users of new feeders (80%, χ2 = 4.14, df = 1, P = 0.04), despite an even sex ratio of this species in the study area (sex ratio: 92 females, 106 males; P = 0.39).

Bottom Line: Use of novel food sources was faster in urban habitats and the presence of other feeders reduced the time until a new feeder was located.Urbanization may be associated with behavioural skills, technical innovations and neophilia resulting in faster discovery of new food sources.This process is accelerated by the experience of feeder use in the vicinity, with a strong modifying effect of the number of domestic cats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Zoology, Poznań University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 71C, PL-60-625 Poznań, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Adapting to exploit new food sources may be essential, particularly in winter, when the impact of food limitation on survival of individuals is critical. One of the most important additional sources of food for birds in human settlements is birdfeeders. At a large spatial scale, we experimentally provided birdfeeders with four different kinds of food to analyze exploitation and use of a novel food supply provided by humans. Nine species started foraging at the new birdfeeders. The species that exploited the new feeders the fastest was the great tit. Use of novel food sources was faster in urban habitats and the presence of other feeders reduced the time until a new feeder was located. Urbanization may be associated with behavioural skills, technical innovations and neophilia resulting in faster discovery of new food sources. This process is accelerated by the experience of feeder use in the vicinity, with a strong modifying effect of the number of domestic cats.

No MeSH data available.