Limits...
Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical structure of molecular beacon based on gold nano particle.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493553&req=5

biosensors-05-00337-f018: Chemical structure of molecular beacon based on gold nano particle.

Mentions: Dubertret et al. reported a molecular beacon with a fluorophore and a 1.4 nm diameter gold nanoparticle as a quencher (Figure 18) [95]. The fluorescence quenching efficiency depends on the distance between the fluorophore and the gold nanoparticle. The fluorescence of this hybrid molecule increases by a factor of as much as several thousand as it binds to a complementary single-stranded DNA. This composite molecule is a different type of conventional molecular beacon with a sensitivity enhanced up to 100-fold. In competitive hybridization assays, the ability to detect a single mismatch is eightfold greater with this probe than with other molecular beacons.


Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Chemical structure of molecular beacon based on gold nano particle.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493553&req=5

biosensors-05-00337-f018: Chemical structure of molecular beacon based on gold nano particle.
Mentions: Dubertret et al. reported a molecular beacon with a fluorophore and a 1.4 nm diameter gold nanoparticle as a quencher (Figure 18) [95]. The fluorescence quenching efficiency depends on the distance between the fluorophore and the gold nanoparticle. The fluorescence of this hybrid molecule increases by a factor of as much as several thousand as it binds to a complementary single-stranded DNA. This composite molecule is a different type of conventional molecular beacon with a sensitivity enhanced up to 100-fold. In competitive hybridization assays, the ability to detect a single mismatch is eightfold greater with this probe than with other molecular beacons.

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus