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Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical structure of a fluorescent probe for the detection of VEGF.
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biosensors-05-00337-f015: Chemical structure of a fluorescent probe for the detection of VEGF.

Mentions: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important regulator of angiogenesis, and it promotes the migration and proliferation of endothelial cells and the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting capillaries. Biological responses to VEGF expression result from the binding of VEGF to two membrane-embedded receptors and the subsequent intracellular signaling induced by receptor activation. Therefore, it is important to develop a tool for straightforward, rapid, and highly sensitive detection of VEGF. Suzuki et al. have developed a fluorescent peptide (shown in Figure 15) that emits weak fluorescence in the absence of VEGF, but strong fluorescence upon binding to VEGF [85,86]. The fluorescence intensities of the reagent were plotted in function of the VEGF concentration and a good linear relationship was observed (r2 > 0.984). This reagent was immobilized on an Au plate and nanopillar substrate, which was coated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) via covalent bonding under optimum conditions. The detection limit of VEGF in this study was 1.5 ng/mL, which is sufficient for clinical use. Using this plate and fluorescence spectrometry, VEGF could be successfully detected in rat serum. The experimental results clearly showed that this reagent is a good VEGF indicator with wide applicability.


Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Chemical structure of a fluorescent probe for the detection of VEGF.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493553&req=5

biosensors-05-00337-f015: Chemical structure of a fluorescent probe for the detection of VEGF.
Mentions: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important regulator of angiogenesis, and it promotes the migration and proliferation of endothelial cells and the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting capillaries. Biological responses to VEGF expression result from the binding of VEGF to two membrane-embedded receptors and the subsequent intracellular signaling induced by receptor activation. Therefore, it is important to develop a tool for straightforward, rapid, and highly sensitive detection of VEGF. Suzuki et al. have developed a fluorescent peptide (shown in Figure 15) that emits weak fluorescence in the absence of VEGF, but strong fluorescence upon binding to VEGF [85,86]. The fluorescence intensities of the reagent were plotted in function of the VEGF concentration and a good linear relationship was observed (r2 > 0.984). This reagent was immobilized on an Au plate and nanopillar substrate, which was coated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) via covalent bonding under optimum conditions. The detection limit of VEGF in this study was 1.5 ng/mL, which is sufficient for clinical use. Using this plate and fluorescence spectrometry, VEGF could be successfully detected in rat serum. The experimental results clearly showed that this reagent is a good VEGF indicator with wide applicability.

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus