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Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical structures of fluorescent molecular probes targeting phosphorylated peptide or proteins.
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biosensors-05-00337-f013: Chemical structures of fluorescent molecular probes targeting phosphorylated peptide or proteins.

Mentions: Hamachi et al. described fluorescent probes (compound 1 and 2 in Figure 13) that target phosphorylated groups in peptides or proteins [78]. These probes consist of two anthracene derivatives as fluorophores, and a Zn2+ selective dipicolylamine group that recognizes the phosphorylated chemical species. The fluorescent spectral change of the probe takes place upon binding to the phosphorylated groups. It is clear that these chemosensors can detect a consensus peptide sequence phosphorylated by v-Src with a high affinity (107 M−1) in aqueous solution. To take advantage of this phenomenon, a new peptide tag/artificial probe pair, DpaTyr/D4, composed of a genetically encodable oligo-aspartate sequence and the corresponding multinuclear Zn2+ complexes (compound 3 in Figure 13) were designed and synthesized [79]. The strong binding affinity of the Zn2+-DpaTyr probes with the D4-tag is a result of the multiple coordination bonds and the multivalent effect. It was quantitatively measured by isothermal titration calorimetry. The high affinity between the tag and the probe, indispensable for selective protein labeling, enabled the pair to be used for the labeling and fluorescence imaging of a membrane-bound receptor protein in an intact cell configuration without significantly affecting the receptor signal transduction. Based on the above molecular design, various fluorescent probes for the selective protein recognition have been developed [80,81].


Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Chemical structures of fluorescent molecular probes targeting phosphorylated peptide or proteins.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493553&req=5

biosensors-05-00337-f013: Chemical structures of fluorescent molecular probes targeting phosphorylated peptide or proteins.
Mentions: Hamachi et al. described fluorescent probes (compound 1 and 2 in Figure 13) that target phosphorylated groups in peptides or proteins [78]. These probes consist of two anthracene derivatives as fluorophores, and a Zn2+ selective dipicolylamine group that recognizes the phosphorylated chemical species. The fluorescent spectral change of the probe takes place upon binding to the phosphorylated groups. It is clear that these chemosensors can detect a consensus peptide sequence phosphorylated by v-Src with a high affinity (107 M−1) in aqueous solution. To take advantage of this phenomenon, a new peptide tag/artificial probe pair, DpaTyr/D4, composed of a genetically encodable oligo-aspartate sequence and the corresponding multinuclear Zn2+ complexes (compound 3 in Figure 13) were designed and synthesized [79]. The strong binding affinity of the Zn2+-DpaTyr probes with the D4-tag is a result of the multiple coordination bonds and the multivalent effect. It was quantitatively measured by isothermal titration calorimetry. The high affinity between the tag and the probe, indispensable for selective protein labeling, enabled the pair to be used for the labeling and fluorescence imaging of a membrane-bound receptor protein in an intact cell configuration without significantly affecting the receptor signal transduction. Based on the above molecular design, various fluorescent probes for the selective protein recognition have been developed [80,81].

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus