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Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

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Chemical structures of fluorescent molecular probes for the labeling of histidine in proteins.
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biosensors-05-00337-f011: Chemical structures of fluorescent molecular probes for the labeling of histidine in proteins.

Mentions: Katayama et al. reported the development of a fluorescent probe (NTA-FITC), which contains a nitrilo triacetic acid (NTA) moiety. The Ni2+ ion in this moiety acts as a binding site for an oligo-histidine sequence, and can therefore lead to the site-specific interaction of the fluorescent probe with the tagged protein (Figure 11) [75]. The NTA group forms a sandwich-type metal complex together with the oligohistidine (his-tag). This ‘his-tag’ is often attached to proteins for convenient purification, but could also be used as a tool to detect a peptide or protein on a nitrocellulose membrane using a novel fluorescent NTA derivative.


Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Chemical structures of fluorescent molecular probes for the labeling of histidine in proteins.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493553&req=5

biosensors-05-00337-f011: Chemical structures of fluorescent molecular probes for the labeling of histidine in proteins.
Mentions: Katayama et al. reported the development of a fluorescent probe (NTA-FITC), which contains a nitrilo triacetic acid (NTA) moiety. The Ni2+ ion in this moiety acts as a binding site for an oligo-histidine sequence, and can therefore lead to the site-specific interaction of the fluorescent probe with the tagged protein (Figure 11) [75]. The NTA group forms a sandwich-type metal complex together with the oligohistidine (his-tag). This ‘his-tag’ is often attached to proteins for convenient purification, but could also be used as a tool to detect a peptide or protein on a nitrocellulose membrane using a novel fluorescent NTA derivative.

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus