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Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical structure of KMG-104-AsH.
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biosensors-05-00337-f008: Chemical structure of KMG-104-AsH.

Mentions: In order to incorporate the fluorescent probe KMG-104 into a protein and to study the mobilization and underlying mechanisms of Mg2+, KMG-104-AsH has been developed (shown in Figure 8). KMG-104-AsH is composed of the highly selective fluorescent Mg2+ probe and a tetracysteine peptide tag (TCtag), which can be genetically incorporated into any protein [53]. The fluorescence intensity of KMG-104-AsH increased by more than 10-fold by binding to both the TCtag peptide and Mg2+, and had a highly selective affinity for Mg2+ (Kd for Mg = 1.7 mM, Kd for Ca = 100 mM). Moreover, fluorescent imaging of intracellular Mg2+ in HeLa cells showed that this FlAsH-type Mg2+ sensing probe was membrane-permeable and bound specifically to tagged proteins, such as TCtag-actin and mKeima-TCtag targeted to the cytoplasm and the mitochondrial intermembrane space. This probe is expected to be a valuable tool for elucidating the dynamics and mechanisms of intracellular localization of Mg2+.


Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Chemical structure of KMG-104-AsH.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493553&req=5

biosensors-05-00337-f008: Chemical structure of KMG-104-AsH.
Mentions: In order to incorporate the fluorescent probe KMG-104 into a protein and to study the mobilization and underlying mechanisms of Mg2+, KMG-104-AsH has been developed (shown in Figure 8). KMG-104-AsH is composed of the highly selective fluorescent Mg2+ probe and a tetracysteine peptide tag (TCtag), which can be genetically incorporated into any protein [53]. The fluorescence intensity of KMG-104-AsH increased by more than 10-fold by binding to both the TCtag peptide and Mg2+, and had a highly selective affinity for Mg2+ (Kd for Mg = 1.7 mM, Kd for Ca = 100 mM). Moreover, fluorescent imaging of intracellular Mg2+ in HeLa cells showed that this FlAsH-type Mg2+ sensing probe was membrane-permeable and bound specifically to tagged proteins, such as TCtag-actin and mKeima-TCtag targeted to the cytoplasm and the mitochondrial intermembrane space. This probe is expected to be a valuable tool for elucidating the dynamics and mechanisms of intracellular localization of Mg2+.

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus