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Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

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Chemical structures of Ca2+ fluorescent molecular probes.
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biosensors-05-00337-f003: Chemical structures of Ca2+ fluorescent molecular probes.

Mentions: Fluorescent Ca2+ probes, which were initially developed by Tsien et al. in the 1980s, have been of enormous benefit to life science and biomedical research. A new family of highly fluorescent indicators, called fura-2, has been synthesized for the biochemical studies of the physiological role of cytosolic free Ca2+ [13]. The chemical structure of fura-2 is shown in Figure 3. Fura-2 combines an 8-coordinate tetracarboxylate chelating site with stilbene chromophores [14]. Incorporation of the ethylenic linkage of the stilbene into a heterocyclic ring enhances the quantum efficiency and photochemical stability of the fluorophore. Compared to the widely used predecessor “quina”, fura-2 offers up to 30-fold brighter fluorescence, based on major changes in the wavelength and not just the intensity upon Ca2+ binding. Although it has marginally lower affinities for Ca2+, fura-2 has slightly longer wavelengths of excitation, and a considerably improved selectivity for Ca2+ over other divalent cations.


Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances.

Suzuki Y, Yokoyama K - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Chemical structures of Ca2+ fluorescent molecular probes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493553&req=5

biosensors-05-00337-f003: Chemical structures of Ca2+ fluorescent molecular probes.
Mentions: Fluorescent Ca2+ probes, which were initially developed by Tsien et al. in the 1980s, have been of enormous benefit to life science and biomedical research. A new family of highly fluorescent indicators, called fura-2, has been synthesized for the biochemical studies of the physiological role of cytosolic free Ca2+ [13]. The chemical structure of fura-2 is shown in Figure 3. Fura-2 combines an 8-coordinate tetracarboxylate chelating site with stilbene chromophores [14]. Incorporation of the ethylenic linkage of the stilbene into a heterocyclic ring enhances the quantum efficiency and photochemical stability of the fluorophore. Compared to the widely used predecessor “quina”, fura-2 offers up to 30-fold brighter fluorescence, based on major changes in the wavelength and not just the intensity upon Ca2+ binding. Although it has marginally lower affinities for Ca2+, fura-2 has slightly longer wavelengths of excitation, and a considerably improved selectivity for Ca2+ over other divalent cations.

Bottom Line: This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information.Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors.To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. suzuki-yoshio@aist.go.jp.

ABSTRACT
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus