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A Comparative Study of Physiological Monitoring with a Wearable Opto-Electronic Patch Sensor (OEPS) for Motion Reduction.

Alzahrani A, Hu S, Azorin-Peris V - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: The protocol involved 16 healthy subjects and was designed to test the features of OEPS, with emphasis on the effective reduction of motion artefacts through the utilization of a 3MA as a movement reference.The results show significant agreement between the heart rates from the reference measurements and the recovered signals.The outcome of the present work incites the prospects of OEPS on physiological monitoring during physical activities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Ashby Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK. A.Alzahrani@lboro.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
This paper presents a comparative study in physiological monitoring between a wearable opto-electronic patch sensor (OEPS) comprising a three-axis Microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) accelerometer (3MA) and commercial devices. The study aims to effectively capture critical physiological parameters, for instance, oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiration rate and heart rate variability, as extracted from the pulsatile waveforms captured by OEPS against motion artefacts when using the commercial probe. The protocol involved 16 healthy subjects and was designed to test the features of OEPS, with emphasis on the effective reduction of motion artefacts through the utilization of a 3MA as a movement reference. The results show significant agreement between the heart rates from the reference measurements and the recovered signals. Significance of standard deviation and error of mean yield values of 2.27 and 0.65 beats per minute, respectively; and a high correlation (0.97) between the results of the commercial sensor and OEPS. T, Wilcoxon and Bland-Altman with 95% limit of agreement tests were also applied in the comparison of heart rates extracted from these sensors, yielding a mean difference (MD: 0.08). The outcome of the present work incites the prospects of OEPS on physiological monitoring during physical activities.

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PPG signals captured by OEPS with green (525 nm), red (650 nm) and IR (870 nm) LED illumination.
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biosensors-05-00288-f007: PPG signals captured by OEPS with green (525 nm), red (650 nm) and IR (870 nm) LED illumination.

Mentions: To evaluate the performance of the proposed motion artefact reduction approach, three characteristics were examined in the captured PPG data: (1) the quality of signal reconstruction via visual inspection; (2) the differences in heart rate between the reference signals and the recovered signals; and (3) the quality of recovered signals via visual inspection of their frequency content. Figure 7 shows representative normal PPG signals from the OEPS at multiple wavelengths as captured from the palm of a subject at rest (sitting).


A Comparative Study of Physiological Monitoring with a Wearable Opto-Electronic Patch Sensor (OEPS) for Motion Reduction.

Alzahrani A, Hu S, Azorin-Peris V - Biosensors (Basel) (2015)

PPG signals captured by OEPS with green (525 nm), red (650 nm) and IR (870 nm) LED illumination.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493550&req=5

biosensors-05-00288-f007: PPG signals captured by OEPS with green (525 nm), red (650 nm) and IR (870 nm) LED illumination.
Mentions: To evaluate the performance of the proposed motion artefact reduction approach, three characteristics were examined in the captured PPG data: (1) the quality of signal reconstruction via visual inspection; (2) the differences in heart rate between the reference signals and the recovered signals; and (3) the quality of recovered signals via visual inspection of their frequency content. Figure 7 shows representative normal PPG signals from the OEPS at multiple wavelengths as captured from the palm of a subject at rest (sitting).

Bottom Line: The protocol involved 16 healthy subjects and was designed to test the features of OEPS, with emphasis on the effective reduction of motion artefacts through the utilization of a 3MA as a movement reference.The results show significant agreement between the heart rates from the reference measurements and the recovered signals.The outcome of the present work incites the prospects of OEPS on physiological monitoring during physical activities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Ashby Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK. A.Alzahrani@lboro.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
This paper presents a comparative study in physiological monitoring between a wearable opto-electronic patch sensor (OEPS) comprising a three-axis Microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) accelerometer (3MA) and commercial devices. The study aims to effectively capture critical physiological parameters, for instance, oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiration rate and heart rate variability, as extracted from the pulsatile waveforms captured by OEPS against motion artefacts when using the commercial probe. The protocol involved 16 healthy subjects and was designed to test the features of OEPS, with emphasis on the effective reduction of motion artefacts through the utilization of a 3MA as a movement reference. The results show significant agreement between the heart rates from the reference measurements and the recovered signals. Significance of standard deviation and error of mean yield values of 2.27 and 0.65 beats per minute, respectively; and a high correlation (0.97) between the results of the commercial sensor and OEPS. T, Wilcoxon and Bland-Altman with 95% limit of agreement tests were also applied in the comparison of heart rates extracted from these sensors, yielding a mean difference (MD: 0.08). The outcome of the present work incites the prospects of OEPS on physiological monitoring during physical activities.

Show MeSH