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A Plasmonic Gold Nanostar Theranostic Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging and Photothermal Therapy.

Liu Y, Ashton JR, Moding EJ, Yuan H, Register JK, Fales AM, Choi J, Whitley MJ, Zhao X, Qi Y, Ma Y, Vaidyanathan G, Zalutsky MR, Kirsch DG, Badea CT, Vo-Dinh T - Theranostics (2015)

Bottom Line: Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity.We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice.In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States ; 2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States ; 3. Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States.

ABSTRACT
Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity. In this study, we developed a gold nanostar (GNS) probe for multi-modality theranostics including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, x-ray computed tomography (CT), two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). We performed radiolabeling, as well as CT and optical imaging, to investigate the GNS probe's biodistribution and intratumoral uptake at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice. The results showed that 30-nm GNS have higher tumor uptake, as well as deeper penetration into tumor interstitial space compared to 60-nm GNS. In addition, we found that a higher injection dose of GNS can increase the percentage of tumor uptake. We also demonstrated the GNS probe's superior photothermal conversion efficiency with a highly concentrated heating effect due to a tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS. This multifunctional GNS probe has the potential to be used for in vivo biosensing, preoperative CT imaging, intraoperative detection with optical methods (SERS and TPL), as well as image-guided photothermal therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) In vivo SERS spectra of 30-nm and 60-nm GNS nanoprobes with pMBA reporter. Unique SERS peaks can be detected at 1067 and 1588 cm-1 in the tumor, but not in the normal muscle. Baselines are artificially offset to visualize each spectrum individually. (B) Mouse with primary sarcomas 3 days after 30-nm GNS injection. Significant GNS accumulation can be seen in the tumor (T), but not in the normal leg muscle of the contralateral leg (N).
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Figure 6: (A) In vivo SERS spectra of 30-nm and 60-nm GNS nanoprobes with pMBA reporter. Unique SERS peaks can be detected at 1067 and 1588 cm-1 in the tumor, but not in the normal muscle. Baselines are artificially offset to visualize each spectrum individually. (B) Mouse with primary sarcomas 3 days after 30-nm GNS injection. Significant GNS accumulation can be seen in the tumor (T), but not in the normal leg muscle of the contralateral leg (N).

Mentions: Gold nanostars exhibit very intense SERS signal due to strong local field enhancement at the tips of the nanostar spikes. Our previous study showed that GNS SERS enhancement is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of gold nanospheres.31 Following CT imaging, the SERS signal from the GNS that accumulated within each tumor and contralateral leg muscle was measured. Figure 6A shows the SERS spectrum for 30-nm GNS and 60-nm GNS in the sarcoma and normal muscle. The GNS were labeled with pMBA, a Raman reporter. The characteristic SERS peaks of pMBA on GNS at 1067 and 1588 cm-1 were detected in the tumor, but not in the contralateral leg muscle, which shows that SERS has the capability to differentiate tumor from normal muscle. The SERS spectra for Raman reporter pMBA from 30-nm and 60-nm GNS are nearly identical. Those two major peaks were assigned to the stretching vibrational mode of the benzene ring in pMBA based on previous combined theoretical and experimental investigations.47, 48


A Plasmonic Gold Nanostar Theranostic Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging and Photothermal Therapy.

Liu Y, Ashton JR, Moding EJ, Yuan H, Register JK, Fales AM, Choi J, Whitley MJ, Zhao X, Qi Y, Ma Y, Vaidyanathan G, Zalutsky MR, Kirsch DG, Badea CT, Vo-Dinh T - Theranostics (2015)

(A) In vivo SERS spectra of 30-nm and 60-nm GNS nanoprobes with pMBA reporter. Unique SERS peaks can be detected at 1067 and 1588 cm-1 in the tumor, but not in the normal muscle. Baselines are artificially offset to visualize each spectrum individually. (B) Mouse with primary sarcomas 3 days after 30-nm GNS injection. Significant GNS accumulation can be seen in the tumor (T), but not in the normal leg muscle of the contralateral leg (N).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 6: (A) In vivo SERS spectra of 30-nm and 60-nm GNS nanoprobes with pMBA reporter. Unique SERS peaks can be detected at 1067 and 1588 cm-1 in the tumor, but not in the normal muscle. Baselines are artificially offset to visualize each spectrum individually. (B) Mouse with primary sarcomas 3 days after 30-nm GNS injection. Significant GNS accumulation can be seen in the tumor (T), but not in the normal leg muscle of the contralateral leg (N).
Mentions: Gold nanostars exhibit very intense SERS signal due to strong local field enhancement at the tips of the nanostar spikes. Our previous study showed that GNS SERS enhancement is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of gold nanospheres.31 Following CT imaging, the SERS signal from the GNS that accumulated within each tumor and contralateral leg muscle was measured. Figure 6A shows the SERS spectrum for 30-nm GNS and 60-nm GNS in the sarcoma and normal muscle. The GNS were labeled with pMBA, a Raman reporter. The characteristic SERS peaks of pMBA on GNS at 1067 and 1588 cm-1 were detected in the tumor, but not in the contralateral leg muscle, which shows that SERS has the capability to differentiate tumor from normal muscle. The SERS spectra for Raman reporter pMBA from 30-nm and 60-nm GNS are nearly identical. Those two major peaks were assigned to the stretching vibrational mode of the benzene ring in pMBA based on previous combined theoretical and experimental investigations.47, 48

Bottom Line: Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity.We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice.In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States ; 2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States ; 3. Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States.

ABSTRACT
Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity. In this study, we developed a gold nanostar (GNS) probe for multi-modality theranostics including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, x-ray computed tomography (CT), two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). We performed radiolabeling, as well as CT and optical imaging, to investigate the GNS probe's biodistribution and intratumoral uptake at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice. The results showed that 30-nm GNS have higher tumor uptake, as well as deeper penetration into tumor interstitial space compared to 60-nm GNS. In addition, we found that a higher injection dose of GNS can increase the percentage of tumor uptake. We also demonstrated the GNS probe's superior photothermal conversion efficiency with a highly concentrated heating effect due to a tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS. This multifunctional GNS probe has the potential to be used for in vivo biosensing, preoperative CT imaging, intraoperative detection with optical methods (SERS and TPL), as well as image-guided photothermal therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus