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A Plasmonic Gold Nanostar Theranostic Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging and Photothermal Therapy.

Liu Y, Ashton JR, Moding EJ, Yuan H, Register JK, Fales AM, Choi J, Whitley MJ, Zhao X, Qi Y, Ma Y, Vaidyanathan G, Zalutsky MR, Kirsch DG, Badea CT, Vo-Dinh T - Theranostics (2015)

Bottom Line: Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity.We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice.In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States ; 2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States ; 3. Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States.

ABSTRACT
Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity. In this study, we developed a gold nanostar (GNS) probe for multi-modality theranostics including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, x-ray computed tomography (CT), two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). We performed radiolabeling, as well as CT and optical imaging, to investigate the GNS probe's biodistribution and intratumoral uptake at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice. The results showed that 30-nm GNS have higher tumor uptake, as well as deeper penetration into tumor interstitial space compared to 60-nm GNS. In addition, we found that a higher injection dose of GNS can increase the percentage of tumor uptake. We also demonstrated the GNS probe's superior photothermal conversion efficiency with a highly concentrated heating effect due to a tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS. This multifunctional GNS probe has the potential to be used for in vivo biosensing, preoperative CT imaging, intraoperative detection with optical methods (SERS and TPL), as well as image-guided photothermal therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

TEM images of 12-nm gold nanospheres (A), 30-nm GNS (B), and 60-nm GNS (C). UV-Vis spectra of 12-nm gold nanospheres, 30-nm GNS, and 60-nm GNS solutions (D). The plasmon peaks are 520 nm for 12-nm nanospheres (5 nM), 945 nm for 30-nm GNS (0.2 nM), and 706 nm for 60-nm GNS (0.1 nM), respectively. Scale bar is 20 nm in all images.
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Figure 1: TEM images of 12-nm gold nanospheres (A), 30-nm GNS (B), and 60-nm GNS (C). UV-Vis spectra of 12-nm gold nanospheres, 30-nm GNS, and 60-nm GNS solutions (D). The plasmon peaks are 520 nm for 12-nm nanospheres (5 nM), 945 nm for 30-nm GNS (0.2 nM), and 706 nm for 60-nm GNS (0.1 nM), respectively. Scale bar is 20 nm in all images.

Mentions: GNS (30-nm and 60-nm) were synthesized via a seed-mediated method, in which gold ions were reduced onto the surface of 12-nm gold nanospheres using ascorbic acid in the presence of AgNO3. This procedure causes asymmetric growth of the gold cores, resulting in the development of multiple gold spikes. TEM images and UV-Vis spectra of the synthesized nanoparticles are shown in Figure 1.


A Plasmonic Gold Nanostar Theranostic Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging and Photothermal Therapy.

Liu Y, Ashton JR, Moding EJ, Yuan H, Register JK, Fales AM, Choi J, Whitley MJ, Zhao X, Qi Y, Ma Y, Vaidyanathan G, Zalutsky MR, Kirsch DG, Badea CT, Vo-Dinh T - Theranostics (2015)

TEM images of 12-nm gold nanospheres (A), 30-nm GNS (B), and 60-nm GNS (C). UV-Vis spectra of 12-nm gold nanospheres, 30-nm GNS, and 60-nm GNS solutions (D). The plasmon peaks are 520 nm for 12-nm nanospheres (5 nM), 945 nm for 30-nm GNS (0.2 nM), and 706 nm for 60-nm GNS (0.1 nM), respectively. Scale bar is 20 nm in all images.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493533&req=5

Figure 1: TEM images of 12-nm gold nanospheres (A), 30-nm GNS (B), and 60-nm GNS (C). UV-Vis spectra of 12-nm gold nanospheres, 30-nm GNS, and 60-nm GNS solutions (D). The plasmon peaks are 520 nm for 12-nm nanospheres (5 nM), 945 nm for 30-nm GNS (0.2 nM), and 706 nm for 60-nm GNS (0.1 nM), respectively. Scale bar is 20 nm in all images.
Mentions: GNS (30-nm and 60-nm) were synthesized via a seed-mediated method, in which gold ions were reduced onto the surface of 12-nm gold nanospheres using ascorbic acid in the presence of AgNO3. This procedure causes asymmetric growth of the gold cores, resulting in the development of multiple gold spikes. TEM images and UV-Vis spectra of the synthesized nanoparticles are shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity.We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice.In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States ; 2. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States ; 3. Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, United States.

ABSTRACT
Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity. In this study, we developed a gold nanostar (GNS) probe for multi-modality theranostics including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, x-ray computed tomography (CT), two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). We performed radiolabeling, as well as CT and optical imaging, to investigate the GNS probe's biodistribution and intratumoral uptake at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice. The results showed that 30-nm GNS have higher tumor uptake, as well as deeper penetration into tumor interstitial space compared to 60-nm GNS. In addition, we found that a higher injection dose of GNS can increase the percentage of tumor uptake. We also demonstrated the GNS probe's superior photothermal conversion efficiency with a highly concentrated heating effect due to a tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS. This multifunctional GNS probe has the potential to be used for in vivo biosensing, preoperative CT imaging, intraoperative detection with optical methods (SERS and TPL), as well as image-guided photothermal therapy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus