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Nanomedicine approaches for corneal diseases.

Chaurasia SS, Lim RR, Lakshminarayanan R, Mohan RR - J Funct Biomater (2015)

Bottom Line: This often results in poor efficacy and several side-effects.The promise of nanomedicine approaches for treating corneal defects and restoring vision without side effects in preclinical animal studies has been demonstrated.Numerous polymeric, metallic and hybrid nanoparticles capable of transporting genes into desired corneal cells to intercept pathologic pathways and processes leading to blindness have been identified.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology Veterinary Medicine & Surgery, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. chaurasias@missouri.edu.

ABSTRACT
Corneal diseases are the third leading cause of blindness globally. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), steroids, antibiotics and tissue transplantation are currently used to treat corneal pathological conditions. However, barrier properties of the ocular surface necessitate high concentration of the drugs applied in the eye repeatedly. This often results in poor efficacy and several side-effects. Nanoparticle-based molecular medicine seeks to overcome these limitations by enhancing the permeability and pharmacological properties of the drugs. The promise of nanomedicine approaches for treating corneal defects and restoring vision without side effects in preclinical animal studies has been demonstrated. Numerous polymeric, metallic and hybrid nanoparticles capable of transporting genes into desired corneal cells to intercept pathologic pathways and processes leading to blindness have been identified. This review provides an overview of corneal diseases, nanovector properties and their applications in drug-delivery and corneal disease management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Treatment of corneal haze with nanoparticles. Corneal haze was developed in rabbit corneas using −9.0 diopter photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) with excimer laser. Representative stereomicroscopy (A,B) and slit-lamp (C,D) images of laser-ablated rabbit corneas that received a single 5 min topical application of PEI2-AuNPs nanoparticle transfection solution without BMP7 (A,C) or with BMP7 expressing gene (B,D) obtained four weeks after PRK.
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jfb-06-00277-f005: Treatment of corneal haze with nanoparticles. Corneal haze was developed in rabbit corneas using −9.0 diopter photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) with excimer laser. Representative stereomicroscopy (A,B) and slit-lamp (C,D) images of laser-ablated rabbit corneas that received a single 5 min topical application of PEI2-AuNPs nanoparticle transfection solution without BMP7 (A,C) or with BMP7 expressing gene (B,D) obtained four weeks after PRK.

Mentions: Hybrid nanoparticles are the most widely used metallic nanoparticles conjugated with polymeric compounds studied in ophthalmology. Recently, the efficiency of 2kDa PEI conjugated to gold nanoparticles (PEI2-Au-NPs) for delivering genes in the human cornea in vitro and rabbit cornea in vivo has been reported (Figure 5). This was the first report of hybrid nanoparticles delivering foreign genes into the rabbit cornea in vivo with a low toxicity, rapid uptake and slow clearance, suggesting that PEI2-AuNPs may provide a safe and effective platform for delivering therapeutic genes into desired corneal cells [25]. These nanoparticles can bind large therapeutic genes, which make them an excellent candidate for corneal nanomedicine development [25].


Nanomedicine approaches for corneal diseases.

Chaurasia SS, Lim RR, Lakshminarayanan R, Mohan RR - J Funct Biomater (2015)

Treatment of corneal haze with nanoparticles. Corneal haze was developed in rabbit corneas using −9.0 diopter photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) with excimer laser. Representative stereomicroscopy (A,B) and slit-lamp (C,D) images of laser-ablated rabbit corneas that received a single 5 min topical application of PEI2-AuNPs nanoparticle transfection solution without BMP7 (A,C) or with BMP7 expressing gene (B,D) obtained four weeks after PRK.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493512&req=5

jfb-06-00277-f005: Treatment of corneal haze with nanoparticles. Corneal haze was developed in rabbit corneas using −9.0 diopter photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) with excimer laser. Representative stereomicroscopy (A,B) and slit-lamp (C,D) images of laser-ablated rabbit corneas that received a single 5 min topical application of PEI2-AuNPs nanoparticle transfection solution without BMP7 (A,C) or with BMP7 expressing gene (B,D) obtained four weeks after PRK.
Mentions: Hybrid nanoparticles are the most widely used metallic nanoparticles conjugated with polymeric compounds studied in ophthalmology. Recently, the efficiency of 2kDa PEI conjugated to gold nanoparticles (PEI2-Au-NPs) for delivering genes in the human cornea in vitro and rabbit cornea in vivo has been reported (Figure 5). This was the first report of hybrid nanoparticles delivering foreign genes into the rabbit cornea in vivo with a low toxicity, rapid uptake and slow clearance, suggesting that PEI2-AuNPs may provide a safe and effective platform for delivering therapeutic genes into desired corneal cells [25]. These nanoparticles can bind large therapeutic genes, which make them an excellent candidate for corneal nanomedicine development [25].

Bottom Line: This often results in poor efficacy and several side-effects.The promise of nanomedicine approaches for treating corneal defects and restoring vision without side effects in preclinical animal studies has been demonstrated.Numerous polymeric, metallic and hybrid nanoparticles capable of transporting genes into desired corneal cells to intercept pathologic pathways and processes leading to blindness have been identified.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology Veterinary Medicine & Surgery, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. chaurasias@missouri.edu.

ABSTRACT
Corneal diseases are the third leading cause of blindness globally. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), steroids, antibiotics and tissue transplantation are currently used to treat corneal pathological conditions. However, barrier properties of the ocular surface necessitate high concentration of the drugs applied in the eye repeatedly. This often results in poor efficacy and several side-effects. Nanoparticle-based molecular medicine seeks to overcome these limitations by enhancing the permeability and pharmacological properties of the drugs. The promise of nanomedicine approaches for treating corneal defects and restoring vision without side effects in preclinical animal studies has been demonstrated. Numerous polymeric, metallic and hybrid nanoparticles capable of transporting genes into desired corneal cells to intercept pathologic pathways and processes leading to blindness have been identified. This review provides an overview of corneal diseases, nanovector properties and their applications in drug-delivery and corneal disease management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus