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Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

Massaroni C, Saccomandi P, Schena E - J Funct Biomater (2015)

Bottom Line: Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing.In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages.Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Integrated Research, Università campus Bio-Medico, Alvaro del Portillo, 21, Rome 00128, Italy. c.massaroni@unicampus.it.

ABSTRACT
The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic representation of the monitoring systems proposed by and developed in the optical fiber sensors embedded into technical textile for healthcare (OFSETH) project.
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jfb-06-00204-f003: Schematic representation of the monitoring systems proposed by and developed in the optical fiber sensors embedded into technical textile for healthcare (OFSETH) project.

Mentions: In particular this solution has been employed to monitor respiratory movements. The use of FBG to monitor respiratory movements and breathing rate has been demonstrated in the past [32,50,51], but only during the last decade have they been embedded in smart textiles. A number of studies regarding this topic have been proposed by the groups involved in the OFSETH project. A smart textile embedding two different FOSs (i.e., FBG and macrobending) for respiratory monitoring has been developed. FOSs and the use of MR-compatible connectors allow the use of the proposed smart textiles on anesthetized patients during MR procedures. Indeed, these sensors are free from metallic or electrical conductive wires (when using a custom made MR-compatible connector); in addition, they are remotely interrogated via an optical fiber cable allowing the location of the monitoring unit outside of the MR field [52,53], as schematically reported in Figure 3.


Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

Massaroni C, Saccomandi P, Schena E - J Funct Biomater (2015)

Schematic representation of the monitoring systems proposed by and developed in the optical fiber sensors embedded into technical textile for healthcare (OFSETH) project.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493508&req=5

jfb-06-00204-f003: Schematic representation of the monitoring systems proposed by and developed in the optical fiber sensors embedded into technical textile for healthcare (OFSETH) project.
Mentions: In particular this solution has been employed to monitor respiratory movements. The use of FBG to monitor respiratory movements and breathing rate has been demonstrated in the past [32,50,51], but only during the last decade have they been embedded in smart textiles. A number of studies regarding this topic have been proposed by the groups involved in the OFSETH project. A smart textile embedding two different FOSs (i.e., FBG and macrobending) for respiratory monitoring has been developed. FOSs and the use of MR-compatible connectors allow the use of the proposed smart textiles on anesthetized patients during MR procedures. Indeed, these sensors are free from metallic or electrical conductive wires (when using a custom made MR-compatible connector); in addition, they are remotely interrogated via an optical fiber cable allowing the location of the monitoring unit outside of the MR field [52,53], as schematically reported in Figure 3.

Bottom Line: Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing.In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages.Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Integrated Research, Università campus Bio-Medico, Alvaro del Portillo, 21, Rome 00128, Italy. c.massaroni@unicampus.it.

ABSTRACT
The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

No MeSH data available.