Limits...
Phenotype-Driven Plasma Biobanking Strategies and Methods.

Bowton EA, Collier SP, Wang X, Sutcliffe CB, Van Driest SL, Couch LJ, Herrera M, Jerome RN, Slebos RJ, Alborn WE, Liebler DC, McNaughton CD, Mernaugh RL, Wells QS, Brown NJ, Roden DM, Pulley JM - J Pers Med (2015)

Bottom Line: BioVU, Vanderbilt's DNA biorepository linked to de-identified clinical EMRs, has proven fruitful in its capacity to extensively appeal to numerous areas of biomedical and clinical research, supporting the discovery of genotype-phenotype interactions.Expanding on experiences in BioVU creation and development, we have recently embarked on a parallel effort to collect plasma in addition to DNA from blood specimens leftover after routine clinical testing at Vanderbilt.This initiative offers expanded utility of BioVU by combining proteomic and metabolomic approaches with genomics and/or clinical outcomes, widening the breadth for potential research and subsequent future impact on clinical care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. erica.a.bowton@vanderbilt.edu.

ABSTRACT
Biobank development and integration with clinical data from electronic medical record (EMR) databases have enabled recent strides in genomic research and personalized medicine. BioVU, Vanderbilt's DNA biorepository linked to de-identified clinical EMRs, has proven fruitful in its capacity to extensively appeal to numerous areas of biomedical and clinical research, supporting the discovery of genotype-phenotype interactions. Expanding on experiences in BioVU creation and development, we have recently embarked on a parallel effort to collect plasma in addition to DNA from blood specimens leftover after routine clinical testing at Vanderbilt. This initiative offers expanded utility of BioVU by combining proteomic and metabolomic approaches with genomics and/or clinical outcomes, widening the breadth for potential research and subsequent future impact on clinical care. Here, we describe the considerations and components involved in implementing a plasma biobank program from a feasibility assessment through pilot sample collection.

No MeSH data available.


Example timeline of DNA and plasma parallel collection. BioVU DNA banking occurs in a defined moment in the medical timeline of a patient. DNA acquisition may be before, after or during diagnosis of a particular disease state. In contrast, phenotypic events trigger specific plasma collection, opening the possibility for observation throughout the varying phases of their clinical care.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493492&req=5

jpm-05-00140-f003: Example timeline of DNA and plasma parallel collection. BioVU DNA banking occurs in a defined moment in the medical timeline of a patient. DNA acquisition may be before, after or during diagnosis of a particular disease state. In contrast, phenotypic events trigger specific plasma collection, opening the possibility for observation throughout the varying phases of their clinical care.

Mentions: In many instances, multiple blood tubes may exist for the same subject on the same day. For DNA collection, any tube beyond the one banked is considered a duplicate and is subsequently discarded. In phenotype-specific biobanking, one subject with multiple tubes could theoretically qualify for more than one plasma phenotype; to simplify, we implemented a one tube per subject per day cutoff for plasma banking. The frequency of accumulation can also be an issue for plasma phenotypes to support a successfully-powered study, and the rates of accumulation will vary. Thus, it was necessary to incorporate sophisticated temporal criteria into the sample selection and plasma flagging procedures to accommodate both subject qualification and sample qualification. In other words, the subject may meet phenotype criteria, but the timing of the plasma sample must also meet the pre-defined clinical requirements (e.g., a specific amount of time following a clinical event or serial sample collection with a minimum amount of time in between each sample collected) (Figure 3).


Phenotype-Driven Plasma Biobanking Strategies and Methods.

Bowton EA, Collier SP, Wang X, Sutcliffe CB, Van Driest SL, Couch LJ, Herrera M, Jerome RN, Slebos RJ, Alborn WE, Liebler DC, McNaughton CD, Mernaugh RL, Wells QS, Brown NJ, Roden DM, Pulley JM - J Pers Med (2015)

Example timeline of DNA and plasma parallel collection. BioVU DNA banking occurs in a defined moment in the medical timeline of a patient. DNA acquisition may be before, after or during diagnosis of a particular disease state. In contrast, phenotypic events trigger specific plasma collection, opening the possibility for observation throughout the varying phases of their clinical care.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493492&req=5

jpm-05-00140-f003: Example timeline of DNA and plasma parallel collection. BioVU DNA banking occurs in a defined moment in the medical timeline of a patient. DNA acquisition may be before, after or during diagnosis of a particular disease state. In contrast, phenotypic events trigger specific plasma collection, opening the possibility for observation throughout the varying phases of their clinical care.
Mentions: In many instances, multiple blood tubes may exist for the same subject on the same day. For DNA collection, any tube beyond the one banked is considered a duplicate and is subsequently discarded. In phenotype-specific biobanking, one subject with multiple tubes could theoretically qualify for more than one plasma phenotype; to simplify, we implemented a one tube per subject per day cutoff for plasma banking. The frequency of accumulation can also be an issue for plasma phenotypes to support a successfully-powered study, and the rates of accumulation will vary. Thus, it was necessary to incorporate sophisticated temporal criteria into the sample selection and plasma flagging procedures to accommodate both subject qualification and sample qualification. In other words, the subject may meet phenotype criteria, but the timing of the plasma sample must also meet the pre-defined clinical requirements (e.g., a specific amount of time following a clinical event or serial sample collection with a minimum amount of time in between each sample collected) (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: BioVU, Vanderbilt's DNA biorepository linked to de-identified clinical EMRs, has proven fruitful in its capacity to extensively appeal to numerous areas of biomedical and clinical research, supporting the discovery of genotype-phenotype interactions.Expanding on experiences in BioVU creation and development, we have recently embarked on a parallel effort to collect plasma in addition to DNA from blood specimens leftover after routine clinical testing at Vanderbilt.This initiative offers expanded utility of BioVU by combining proteomic and metabolomic approaches with genomics and/or clinical outcomes, widening the breadth for potential research and subsequent future impact on clinical care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. erica.a.bowton@vanderbilt.edu.

ABSTRACT
Biobank development and integration with clinical data from electronic medical record (EMR) databases have enabled recent strides in genomic research and personalized medicine. BioVU, Vanderbilt's DNA biorepository linked to de-identified clinical EMRs, has proven fruitful in its capacity to extensively appeal to numerous areas of biomedical and clinical research, supporting the discovery of genotype-phenotype interactions. Expanding on experiences in BioVU creation and development, we have recently embarked on a parallel effort to collect plasma in addition to DNA from blood specimens leftover after routine clinical testing at Vanderbilt. This initiative offers expanded utility of BioVU by combining proteomic and metabolomic approaches with genomics and/or clinical outcomes, widening the breadth for potential research and subsequent future impact on clinical care. Here, we describe the considerations and components involved in implementing a plasma biobank program from a feasibility assessment through pilot sample collection.

No MeSH data available.