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Phenotype-Driven Plasma Biobanking Strategies and Methods.

Bowton EA, Collier SP, Wang X, Sutcliffe CB, Van Driest SL, Couch LJ, Herrera M, Jerome RN, Slebos RJ, Alborn WE, Liebler DC, McNaughton CD, Mernaugh RL, Wells QS, Brown NJ, Roden DM, Pulley JM - J Pers Med (2015)

Bottom Line: BioVU, Vanderbilt's DNA biorepository linked to de-identified clinical EMRs, has proven fruitful in its capacity to extensively appeal to numerous areas of biomedical and clinical research, supporting the discovery of genotype-phenotype interactions.Expanding on experiences in BioVU creation and development, we have recently embarked on a parallel effort to collect plasma in addition to DNA from blood specimens leftover after routine clinical testing at Vanderbilt.This initiative offers expanded utility of BioVU by combining proteomic and metabolomic approaches with genomics and/or clinical outcomes, widening the breadth for potential research and subsequent future impact on clinical care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. erica.a.bowton@vanderbilt.edu.

ABSTRACT
Biobank development and integration with clinical data from electronic medical record (EMR) databases have enabled recent strides in genomic research and personalized medicine. BioVU, Vanderbilt's DNA biorepository linked to de-identified clinical EMRs, has proven fruitful in its capacity to extensively appeal to numerous areas of biomedical and clinical research, supporting the discovery of genotype-phenotype interactions. Expanding on experiences in BioVU creation and development, we have recently embarked on a parallel effort to collect plasma in addition to DNA from blood specimens leftover after routine clinical testing at Vanderbilt. This initiative offers expanded utility of BioVU by combining proteomic and metabolomic approaches with genomics and/or clinical outcomes, widening the breadth for potential research and subsequent future impact on clinical care. Here, we describe the considerations and components involved in implementing a plasma biobank program from a feasibility assessment through pilot sample collection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

BioVU plasma biobanking is supported by existing DNA and EMR de-identification infrastructure. Leftover blood samples are scanned and queried against a database for BioVU DNA biobanking eligibility. Should DNA be already banked, the sample is considered for phenotypic plasma extraction. Both DNA and plasma are linked to their EMR through scrubbing by a secure one-way hash algorithm. Samples and records are linked via a de-identified research identifier.
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jpm-05-00140-f001: BioVU plasma biobanking is supported by existing DNA and EMR de-identification infrastructure. Leftover blood samples are scanned and queried against a database for BioVU DNA biobanking eligibility. Should DNA be already banked, the sample is considered for phenotypic plasma extraction. Both DNA and plasma are linked to their EMR through scrubbing by a secure one-way hash algorithm. Samples and records are linked via a de-identified research identifier.

Mentions: DNA isolation and banking from eligible peripheral blood biospecimens is a well-established, highly-automated process carried out at a core laboratory facility within the Vanderbilt Medical Center. During the process of DNA extraction from whole blood, ancillary blood products, like serum and plasma, are discarded; thus the addition of plasma collection presents an opportunity to maximize the utility of the leftover blood specimens (Figure 1).


Phenotype-Driven Plasma Biobanking Strategies and Methods.

Bowton EA, Collier SP, Wang X, Sutcliffe CB, Van Driest SL, Couch LJ, Herrera M, Jerome RN, Slebos RJ, Alborn WE, Liebler DC, McNaughton CD, Mernaugh RL, Wells QS, Brown NJ, Roden DM, Pulley JM - J Pers Med (2015)

BioVU plasma biobanking is supported by existing DNA and EMR de-identification infrastructure. Leftover blood samples are scanned and queried against a database for BioVU DNA biobanking eligibility. Should DNA be already banked, the sample is considered for phenotypic plasma extraction. Both DNA and plasma are linked to their EMR through scrubbing by a secure one-way hash algorithm. Samples and records are linked via a de-identified research identifier.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493492&req=5

jpm-05-00140-f001: BioVU plasma biobanking is supported by existing DNA and EMR de-identification infrastructure. Leftover blood samples are scanned and queried against a database for BioVU DNA biobanking eligibility. Should DNA be already banked, the sample is considered for phenotypic plasma extraction. Both DNA and plasma are linked to their EMR through scrubbing by a secure one-way hash algorithm. Samples and records are linked via a de-identified research identifier.
Mentions: DNA isolation and banking from eligible peripheral blood biospecimens is a well-established, highly-automated process carried out at a core laboratory facility within the Vanderbilt Medical Center. During the process of DNA extraction from whole blood, ancillary blood products, like serum and plasma, are discarded; thus the addition of plasma collection presents an opportunity to maximize the utility of the leftover blood specimens (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: BioVU, Vanderbilt's DNA biorepository linked to de-identified clinical EMRs, has proven fruitful in its capacity to extensively appeal to numerous areas of biomedical and clinical research, supporting the discovery of genotype-phenotype interactions.Expanding on experiences in BioVU creation and development, we have recently embarked on a parallel effort to collect plasma in addition to DNA from blood specimens leftover after routine clinical testing at Vanderbilt.This initiative offers expanded utility of BioVU by combining proteomic and metabolomic approaches with genomics and/or clinical outcomes, widening the breadth for potential research and subsequent future impact on clinical care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. erica.a.bowton@vanderbilt.edu.

ABSTRACT
Biobank development and integration with clinical data from electronic medical record (EMR) databases have enabled recent strides in genomic research and personalized medicine. BioVU, Vanderbilt's DNA biorepository linked to de-identified clinical EMRs, has proven fruitful in its capacity to extensively appeal to numerous areas of biomedical and clinical research, supporting the discovery of genotype-phenotype interactions. Expanding on experiences in BioVU creation and development, we have recently embarked on a parallel effort to collect plasma in addition to DNA from blood specimens leftover after routine clinical testing at Vanderbilt. This initiative offers expanded utility of BioVU by combining proteomic and metabolomic approaches with genomics and/or clinical outcomes, widening the breadth for potential research and subsequent future impact on clinical care. Here, we describe the considerations and components involved in implementing a plasma biobank program from a feasibility assessment through pilot sample collection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus