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Maternal health phone line: saving women in papua new Guinea.

Watson AH, Sabumei G, Mola G, Iedema R - J Pers Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Specific examples in which the phone line has helped to create positive health outcomes will be outlined in the paper, drawn from research interviews.The Childbirth Emergency Phone project has shown itself to play a critical role in enabling healthcare workers to address life-threatening childbirth complications.The project shows potential for rollout across PNG; potentially reducing maternal morbidity and maternal mortality rates by overcoming communication challenges.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PNG Economic and Public Sector Program, PO Box 776, Port Moresby, NCD 111, Papua New Guinea. ahawatson@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
This paper presents the findings of a research project which has involved the establishment of a maternal health phone line in Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea (PNG). Mobile phones and landline phones are key information and communication technologies (ICTs). This research study uses the "ICTs for healthcare development" model to ascertain benefits and barriers to the successful implementation of the Childbirth Emergency Phone. PNG has a very high maternal mortality rate. The "three stages of delay" typology was developed by Thaddeus and Maine to determine factors that might delay provision of appropriate medical treatment and hence increase risk of maternal death. The "three stages of delay" typology has been utilised in various developing countries and also in the present study. Research undertaken has involved semi-structured interviews with health workers, both in rural settings and in the labour ward in Alotau. Additional data has been gathered through focus groups with health workers, analysis of notes made during phone calls, interviews with women and community leaders, observations and field visits. One hundred percent of interviewees (n = 42) said the project helped to solve communication barriers between rural health workers and Alotau Provincial Hospital. Specific examples in which the phone line has helped to create positive health outcomes will be outlined in the paper, drawn from research interviews. The Childbirth Emergency Phone project has shown itself to play a critical role in enabling healthcare workers to address life-threatening childbirth complications. The project shows potential for rollout across PNG; potentially reducing maternal morbidity and maternal mortality rates by overcoming communication challenges.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Factors contributing to the three stages of delay (diagram based on [25]).
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jpm-05-00120-f003: Factors contributing to the three stages of delay (diagram based on [25]).

Mentions: Throughout the research interviews, instances of all three types of delay were evident. Factors contributing to these delays are shown in Figure 3. Regarding delays in the decision to seek care (Stage 1), there were five main contributing factors which emerged as recurrent themes: traditional beliefs and customs (15 out of 42 interviews), lack of baby necessities (15 out of 42), lack of awareness about the need for and value of supervised delivery (18 out of 42), community perceptions of health centres and community perceptions of healthcare workers. Factors listed in the literature as contributing to delays in reaching an adequate health care facility (Stage 2) were mentioned repeatedly in interviews, including distance, transport availability and poor road condition [25]. In keeping with Thaddeus and Maine’s assessment, factors contributing to delays in receiving adequate care at a facility (Stage 3) in MBP included lack of: adequate supplies, suitable equipment and trained personnel [25,28]. Some interviewees also suggested that poor attitudes of some healthcare workers may contribute to the third type of delay.


Maternal health phone line: saving women in papua new Guinea.

Watson AH, Sabumei G, Mola G, Iedema R - J Pers Med (2015)

Factors contributing to the three stages of delay (diagram based on [25]).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493491&req=5

jpm-05-00120-f003: Factors contributing to the three stages of delay (diagram based on [25]).
Mentions: Throughout the research interviews, instances of all three types of delay were evident. Factors contributing to these delays are shown in Figure 3. Regarding delays in the decision to seek care (Stage 1), there were five main contributing factors which emerged as recurrent themes: traditional beliefs and customs (15 out of 42 interviews), lack of baby necessities (15 out of 42), lack of awareness about the need for and value of supervised delivery (18 out of 42), community perceptions of health centres and community perceptions of healthcare workers. Factors listed in the literature as contributing to delays in reaching an adequate health care facility (Stage 2) were mentioned repeatedly in interviews, including distance, transport availability and poor road condition [25]. In keeping with Thaddeus and Maine’s assessment, factors contributing to delays in receiving adequate care at a facility (Stage 3) in MBP included lack of: adequate supplies, suitable equipment and trained personnel [25,28]. Some interviewees also suggested that poor attitudes of some healthcare workers may contribute to the third type of delay.

Bottom Line: Specific examples in which the phone line has helped to create positive health outcomes will be outlined in the paper, drawn from research interviews.The Childbirth Emergency Phone project has shown itself to play a critical role in enabling healthcare workers to address life-threatening childbirth complications.The project shows potential for rollout across PNG; potentially reducing maternal morbidity and maternal mortality rates by overcoming communication challenges.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PNG Economic and Public Sector Program, PO Box 776, Port Moresby, NCD 111, Papua New Guinea. ahawatson@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT
This paper presents the findings of a research project which has involved the establishment of a maternal health phone line in Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea (PNG). Mobile phones and landline phones are key information and communication technologies (ICTs). This research study uses the "ICTs for healthcare development" model to ascertain benefits and barriers to the successful implementation of the Childbirth Emergency Phone. PNG has a very high maternal mortality rate. The "three stages of delay" typology was developed by Thaddeus and Maine to determine factors that might delay provision of appropriate medical treatment and hence increase risk of maternal death. The "three stages of delay" typology has been utilised in various developing countries and also in the present study. Research undertaken has involved semi-structured interviews with health workers, both in rural settings and in the labour ward in Alotau. Additional data has been gathered through focus groups with health workers, analysis of notes made during phone calls, interviews with women and community leaders, observations and field visits. One hundred percent of interviewees (n = 42) said the project helped to solve communication barriers between rural health workers and Alotau Provincial Hospital. Specific examples in which the phone line has helped to create positive health outcomes will be outlined in the paper, drawn from research interviews. The Childbirth Emergency Phone project has shown itself to play a critical role in enabling healthcare workers to address life-threatening childbirth complications. The project shows potential for rollout across PNG; potentially reducing maternal morbidity and maternal mortality rates by overcoming communication challenges.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus