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Perspectives on genetic and genomic technologies in an academic medical center: the duke experience.

Katsanis SH, Minear MA, Vorderstrasse A, Yang N, Reeves JW, Rakhra-Burris T, Cook-Deegan R, Ginsburg GS, Simmons LA - J Pers Med (2015)

Bottom Line: We also found strong support for the return of genetic research results to participants.Respondents favor return of research-based genetic results to participants, but clinicians lack knowledge about pharmacogenetic applications.We identified challenges faced by this institution when implementing genetic and genomic testing into patient care that should inform a policy and education agenda to improve provider support and clinician-researcher partnerships.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine and Health System, Durham, NC 27708, USA. sara.katsanis@duke.edu.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: In this age of personalized medicine, genetic and genomic testing is expected to become instrumental in health care delivery, but little is known about its actual implementation in clinical practice.

Methods: We surveyed Duke faculty and healthcare providers to examine the extent of genetic and genomic testing adoption. We assessed providers' use of genetic and genomic testing options and indications in clinical practice, providers' awareness of pharmacogenetic applications, and providers' opinions on returning research-generated genetic test results to participants. Most clinician respondents currently use family history routinely in their clinical practice, but only 18 percent of clinicians use pharmacogenetics. Only two respondents correctly identified the number of drug package inserts with pharmacogenetic indications. We also found strong support for the return of genetic research results to participants. Our results demonstrate that while Duke healthcare providers are enthusiastic about genomic technologies, use of genomic tools outside of research has been limited. Respondents favor return of research-based genetic results to participants, but clinicians lack knowledge about pharmacogenetic applications. We identified challenges faced by this institution when implementing genetic and genomic testing into patient care that should inform a policy and education agenda to improve provider support and clinician-researcher partnerships.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Attitudes towards return of research results to participants among researchers and non-researchers. (A) In Q14, all participants (N = 186) were asked: “In your opinion, when should genetic results obtained through research be returned?” and were asked to choose one of the following: (a) “According to participant choice,” (b) “When clinically actionable but not necessarily life-threatening (e.g., medication selection/dosing, family planning),” (c) “When clinically actionable and life-threatening,” and (d) “Never be returned.” Examples of genetic research were not provided to gain a general response to the term “genetic research.”; (B) In Q13, all participants (N = 186) were provided a 5-point Likert Scale (strongly agree-strongly disagree) to indicate their agreement with three statements: (1) “Researchers should make an effort to provide participants general information about the progress of the research,” (2) “Research participants have a right to their individual results generated from a research trial,” and (3) “Researchers should make an effort to provide participants personalized information about the research.” Decline to respond selections were not included in the figure, but are included in the sample size given for each question.
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jpm-05-00067-f003: Attitudes towards return of research results to participants among researchers and non-researchers. (A) In Q14, all participants (N = 186) were asked: “In your opinion, when should genetic results obtained through research be returned?” and were asked to choose one of the following: (a) “According to participant choice,” (b) “When clinically actionable but not necessarily life-threatening (e.g., medication selection/dosing, family planning),” (c) “When clinically actionable and life-threatening,” and (d) “Never be returned.” Examples of genetic research were not provided to gain a general response to the term “genetic research.”; (B) In Q13, all participants (N = 186) were provided a 5-point Likert Scale (strongly agree-strongly disagree) to indicate their agreement with three statements: (1) “Researchers should make an effort to provide participants general information about the progress of the research,” (2) “Research participants have a right to their individual results generated from a research trial,” and (3) “Researchers should make an effort to provide participants personalized information about the research.” Decline to respond selections were not included in the figure, but are included in the sample size given for each question.

Mentions: Survey questions.


Perspectives on genetic and genomic technologies in an academic medical center: the duke experience.

Katsanis SH, Minear MA, Vorderstrasse A, Yang N, Reeves JW, Rakhra-Burris T, Cook-Deegan R, Ginsburg GS, Simmons LA - J Pers Med (2015)

Attitudes towards return of research results to participants among researchers and non-researchers. (A) In Q14, all participants (N = 186) were asked: “In your opinion, when should genetic results obtained through research be returned?” and were asked to choose one of the following: (a) “According to participant choice,” (b) “When clinically actionable but not necessarily life-threatening (e.g., medication selection/dosing, family planning),” (c) “When clinically actionable and life-threatening,” and (d) “Never be returned.” Examples of genetic research were not provided to gain a general response to the term “genetic research.”; (B) In Q13, all participants (N = 186) were provided a 5-point Likert Scale (strongly agree-strongly disagree) to indicate their agreement with three statements: (1) “Researchers should make an effort to provide participants general information about the progress of the research,” (2) “Research participants have a right to their individual results generated from a research trial,” and (3) “Researchers should make an effort to provide participants personalized information about the research.” Decline to respond selections were not included in the figure, but are included in the sample size given for each question.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493486&req=5

jpm-05-00067-f003: Attitudes towards return of research results to participants among researchers and non-researchers. (A) In Q14, all participants (N = 186) were asked: “In your opinion, when should genetic results obtained through research be returned?” and were asked to choose one of the following: (a) “According to participant choice,” (b) “When clinically actionable but not necessarily life-threatening (e.g., medication selection/dosing, family planning),” (c) “When clinically actionable and life-threatening,” and (d) “Never be returned.” Examples of genetic research were not provided to gain a general response to the term “genetic research.”; (B) In Q13, all participants (N = 186) were provided a 5-point Likert Scale (strongly agree-strongly disagree) to indicate their agreement with three statements: (1) “Researchers should make an effort to provide participants general information about the progress of the research,” (2) “Research participants have a right to their individual results generated from a research trial,” and (3) “Researchers should make an effort to provide participants personalized information about the research.” Decline to respond selections were not included in the figure, but are included in the sample size given for each question.
Mentions: Survey questions.

Bottom Line: We also found strong support for the return of genetic research results to participants.Respondents favor return of research-based genetic results to participants, but clinicians lack knowledge about pharmacogenetic applications.We identified challenges faced by this institution when implementing genetic and genomic testing into patient care that should inform a policy and education agenda to improve provider support and clinician-researcher partnerships.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine and Health System, Durham, NC 27708, USA. sara.katsanis@duke.edu.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: In this age of personalized medicine, genetic and genomic testing is expected to become instrumental in health care delivery, but little is known about its actual implementation in clinical practice.

Methods: We surveyed Duke faculty and healthcare providers to examine the extent of genetic and genomic testing adoption. We assessed providers' use of genetic and genomic testing options and indications in clinical practice, providers' awareness of pharmacogenetic applications, and providers' opinions on returning research-generated genetic test results to participants. Most clinician respondents currently use family history routinely in their clinical practice, but only 18 percent of clinicians use pharmacogenetics. Only two respondents correctly identified the number of drug package inserts with pharmacogenetic indications. We also found strong support for the return of genetic research results to participants. Our results demonstrate that while Duke healthcare providers are enthusiastic about genomic technologies, use of genomic tools outside of research has been limited. Respondents favor return of research-based genetic results to participants, but clinicians lack knowledge about pharmacogenetic applications. We identified challenges faced by this institution when implementing genetic and genomic testing into patient care that should inform a policy and education agenda to improve provider support and clinician-researcher partnerships.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus