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Sex differences in behavioral outcomes following temperature modulation during induced neonatal hypoxic ischemic injury in rats.

Smith AL, Garbus H, Rosenkrantz TS, Fitch RH - Brain Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that female P7 rats would benefit more from lowered body temperatures as compared to male P7 rats.Our results revealed a significant benefit of temperature reduction in HI females as measured by most of the employed behavioral tasks.However, HI males benefitted from temperature reduction as measured on auditory and non-spatial tasks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, 406 Babbidge Road, Unit 1020, Storrs, CT 06269, USA. amanda.l.smith@uconn.edu.

ABSTRACT
Neonatal hypoxia ischemia (HI; reduced oxygen and/or blood flow to the brain) can cause various degrees of tissue damage, as well as subsequent cognitive/behavioral deficits such as motor, learning/memory, and auditory impairments. These outcomes frequently result from cardiovascular and/or respiratory events observed in premature infants. Data suggests that there is a sex difference in HI outcome, with males being more adversely affected relative to comparably injured females. Brain/body temperature may play a role in modulating the severity of an HI insult, with hypothermia during an insult yielding more favorable anatomical and behavioral outcomes. The current study utilized a postnatal day (P) 7 rodent model of HI injury to assess the effect of temperature modulation during injury in each sex. We hypothesized that female P7 rats would benefit more from lowered body temperatures as compared to male P7 rats. We assessed all subjects on rota-rod, auditory discrimination, and spatial/non-spatial maze tasks. Our results revealed a significant benefit of temperature reduction in HI females as measured by most of the employed behavioral tasks. However, HI males benefitted from temperature reduction as measured on auditory and non-spatial tasks. Our data suggest that temperature reduction protects both sexes from the deleterious effects of HI injury, but task and sex specific patterns of relative efficacy are seen.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) A one-way ANOVA to assess Treatment effects revealed significant differences between Treatment groups (p < 0.05). Further Tukey post hoc analyses revealed that HI normothermic animals performed significantly worse than shams (* p < 0.05), but HI hypothermic animals performed similarly to shams; (b) A one-way ANOVA to assess Treatment effects revealed significant differences between Treatment groups (p < 0.05). Further Tukey post hoc analyses revealed that both HI normothermic animals and HI hypothermic animals performed significantly worse than shams (* p < 0.05, * p < 0.005, respectively).
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brainsci-05-00220-f003: (a) A one-way ANOVA to assess Treatment effects revealed significant differences between Treatment groups (p < 0.05). Further Tukey post hoc analyses revealed that HI normothermic animals performed significantly worse than shams (* p < 0.05), but HI hypothermic animals performed similarly to shams; (b) A one-way ANOVA to assess Treatment effects revealed significant differences between Treatment groups (p < 0.05). Further Tukey post hoc analyses revealed that both HI normothermic animals and HI hypothermic animals performed significantly worse than shams (* p < 0.05, * p < 0.005, respectively).

Mentions: An overall ANOVA revealed a significant Treatment effect (F(2, 56) = 15.356, p < 0.001), as well as Treatment x Sex interaction (F(2, 56) = 6.613, p < 0.05), indicating different performances by Treatment groups, modulated by Sex. Individual one-way ANOVAs for each Sex were also performed, revealing a significant Treatment effect for both females (F(2, 28) = 4.548, p < 0.05), and males (F(2, 28) = 8.727, p < 0.05) (see Figure 3a,b). These results indicate that HI animals of both sexes performed worse than their sham counterparts. Further Tukey post hoc tests for females revealed a significant difference between female HI normothermic animals and female shams (p < 0.05; shams better). A Tukey post hoc test for males confirmed a significant difference between male HI normothermic animals and male shams (p < 0.05; shams better), and also between male HI hypothermic animals and male shams (p < 0.005; shams better).


Sex differences in behavioral outcomes following temperature modulation during induced neonatal hypoxic ischemic injury in rats.

Smith AL, Garbus H, Rosenkrantz TS, Fitch RH - Brain Sci (2015)

(a) A one-way ANOVA to assess Treatment effects revealed significant differences between Treatment groups (p < 0.05). Further Tukey post hoc analyses revealed that HI normothermic animals performed significantly worse than shams (* p < 0.05), but HI hypothermic animals performed similarly to shams; (b) A one-way ANOVA to assess Treatment effects revealed significant differences between Treatment groups (p < 0.05). Further Tukey post hoc analyses revealed that both HI normothermic animals and HI hypothermic animals performed significantly worse than shams (* p < 0.05, * p < 0.005, respectively).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4493466&req=5

brainsci-05-00220-f003: (a) A one-way ANOVA to assess Treatment effects revealed significant differences between Treatment groups (p < 0.05). Further Tukey post hoc analyses revealed that HI normothermic animals performed significantly worse than shams (* p < 0.05), but HI hypothermic animals performed similarly to shams; (b) A one-way ANOVA to assess Treatment effects revealed significant differences between Treatment groups (p < 0.05). Further Tukey post hoc analyses revealed that both HI normothermic animals and HI hypothermic animals performed significantly worse than shams (* p < 0.05, * p < 0.005, respectively).
Mentions: An overall ANOVA revealed a significant Treatment effect (F(2, 56) = 15.356, p < 0.001), as well as Treatment x Sex interaction (F(2, 56) = 6.613, p < 0.05), indicating different performances by Treatment groups, modulated by Sex. Individual one-way ANOVAs for each Sex were also performed, revealing a significant Treatment effect for both females (F(2, 28) = 4.548, p < 0.05), and males (F(2, 28) = 8.727, p < 0.05) (see Figure 3a,b). These results indicate that HI animals of both sexes performed worse than their sham counterparts. Further Tukey post hoc tests for females revealed a significant difference between female HI normothermic animals and female shams (p < 0.05; shams better). A Tukey post hoc test for males confirmed a significant difference between male HI normothermic animals and male shams (p < 0.05; shams better), and also between male HI hypothermic animals and male shams (p < 0.005; shams better).

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that female P7 rats would benefit more from lowered body temperatures as compared to male P7 rats.Our results revealed a significant benefit of temperature reduction in HI females as measured by most of the employed behavioral tasks.However, HI males benefitted from temperature reduction as measured on auditory and non-spatial tasks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, 406 Babbidge Road, Unit 1020, Storrs, CT 06269, USA. amanda.l.smith@uconn.edu.

ABSTRACT
Neonatal hypoxia ischemia (HI; reduced oxygen and/or blood flow to the brain) can cause various degrees of tissue damage, as well as subsequent cognitive/behavioral deficits such as motor, learning/memory, and auditory impairments. These outcomes frequently result from cardiovascular and/or respiratory events observed in premature infants. Data suggests that there is a sex difference in HI outcome, with males being more adversely affected relative to comparably injured females. Brain/body temperature may play a role in modulating the severity of an HI insult, with hypothermia during an insult yielding more favorable anatomical and behavioral outcomes. The current study utilized a postnatal day (P) 7 rodent model of HI injury to assess the effect of temperature modulation during injury in each sex. We hypothesized that female P7 rats would benefit more from lowered body temperatures as compared to male P7 rats. We assessed all subjects on rota-rod, auditory discrimination, and spatial/non-spatial maze tasks. Our results revealed a significant benefit of temperature reduction in HI females as measured by most of the employed behavioral tasks. However, HI males benefitted from temperature reduction as measured on auditory and non-spatial tasks. Our data suggest that temperature reduction protects both sexes from the deleterious effects of HI injury, but task and sex specific patterns of relative efficacy are seen.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus